Related to: 'H for History'

Headline Review

Six Tudor Queens: Jane Seymour, The Haunted Queen

Alison Weir
Authors:
Alison Weir

Jane Seymour: The Haunted Queen by historian Alison Weir, author of the Sunday Times bestsellers Katherine of Aragon: The True Queen and Anne Boleyn: A King's Obsession, is the third enthralling novel in the Six Tudor Queens series. A fascinating look at Henry VIII's third wife. Essential reading for fans of Philippa Gregory and Elizabeth Chadwick.'Weir is excellent on the little details that bring a world to life' GuardianTHE WOMAN HAUNTED BY THE FATE OF HER PREDECESSOR. Eleven days after the death of Anne Boleyn, Jane is dressing for her wedding to the King.She has witnessed at first hand how courtly play can quickly turn to danger and knows she must bear a son . . . or face ruin.This new queen must therefore step out from the shadows cast by Katherine and Anne - in doing so, can she expose a gentler side to the brutal King?JANE SEYMOURTHE THIRD OF HENRY'S QUEENSHER STORYAcclaimed, bestselling historian Alison Weir draws on new research for her captivating novel, which paints a compelling portrait of Jane and casts fresh light on both traditional and modern perceptions of her. Jane was driven by the strength of her faith and a belief that she might do some good in a wicked world. History tells us how she died.This spellbinding novel explores the life she lived.Praise for the SIX TUDOR QUEENS novels:'Alison Weir's wonderfully detailed novel offers a spellbinding solution to the mystery of Anne's true nature . . . Enthralling' Sarah Gristwood'A triumph of fine detail and research and offers a complex depiction of an endlessly fascinating woman' Elizabeth Fremantle'This is Anne Boleyn as you have never seen her before. I could not put it down' Tracy Borman'Well researched and engrossing' Good Housekeeping

Headline Review

Six Tudor Queens: Anne Boleyn, A King's Obsession

Alison Weir
Authors:
Alison Weir

THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER'Weir is excellent on the little details that bring a world to life' GuardianAnne Boleyn: A King's Obsession by bestselling historian Alison Weir, author of Katherine of Aragon: The True Queen, is the second captivating novel in the Six Tudor Queens series. An unforgettable portrait of the ambitious woman whose fate we know all too well, but whose true motivations may surprise you. Essential reading for fans of Philippa Gregory and Elizabeth Chadwick.'Offers a spellbinding solution to the mystery of Anne's true nature . . . Enthralling' Sarah GristwoodThe young woman who changed the course of history.Fresh from the palaces of Burgundy and France, Anne draws attention at the English court, embracing the play of courtly love.But when the King commands, nothing is ever a game.Anne has a spirit worthy of a crown - and the crown is what she seeks. At any price. ANNE BOLEYN. The second of Henry's Queens. Her story. History tells us why she died. This powerful novel shows her as she lived.SIX TUDOR QUEENS. SIX NOVELS. SIX YEARS.

Headline

The Last of Days

Paul Doherty
Authors:
Paul Doherty

In the final days of Henry VIII, one man is there to witness the demise of a legend... King Henry VIII, a fearsome figure of power and stature, lies upon his deathbed diminished by sickness and haunted by ghosts from his past. Only Will Somers, long-serving jester and confidant, sees all. While Henry is confined to his chamber, Will begins a journal that will document his King's last turbulent days.The country is fraught with tension. And with the King's son and heir just nine years old, there are many power-hungry councillors who will stop at nothing to better themselves. Now as the King's health fails, rebellion threatens amidst widespread rumours of plots against him. With few allies remaining, will Henry himself become the final victim of his reckless, bloody reign?Master historian Paul Doherty weaves his magic in an epic tale of murderous schemes and a blood-smattered political order.

Headline

In Time of the Poisoned Queen (Nicholas Segalla series, Book 4)

Paul Doherty
Authors:
Paul Doherty

With so many enemies, how will Nicholas Segalla unravel the web of mysteries?Nicholas Segalla visits Tudor England once again in Paul Doherty's gripping mystery, In the Time of the Poisoned Queen. Perfect for fans of Susanna Gregory and C. J. Sansom.1558 was a year of sinister and bloody conspiracy in England. Deserted by her husband, Philip of Spain, Queen Mary faces an ever-tightening circle of conspiracy and deceit. Rumours and whispers abound that she, like her first minister Reginald Cardinal Pole, is being slowly murdered by a subtle poison. There are many who would benefit from Mary's death: Catherine de' Medici, Queen of France and 'Mistress of the Poisons'; beautiful Mary, Queen of Scots, heiress presumptive to the throne in the eyes of English Catholics; Pope Paul IV surveys the silken threads of treachery from his perch in Rome; and the Queen's own half-sister, Elizabeth, who takes council from her 'little wizard' William Cecil. Who is behind the letters signed by the 'Four Evangelists'? What is the secret concealed in the phrase 'Mark 15.34'? What does a verse from the Gospels predict about the future succession of England? Nicholas Segalla, a mysterious scholar and diplomat, must thread his way through this web of Byzantine intrigue.What readers are saying about Paul Doherty:'A cracker, full of twists and turns, with an overarching mystery of who exactly is Segalla''Paul Doherty's books are a joy to read''The sounds and smells of the period seem to waft from the pages of [Paul Doherty's] books'

Headline Review

Ten Big Ones

Janet Evanovich
Authors:
Janet Evanovich

Not every witness protection programme is fool proof...Stephanie Plum finds herself in the wrong place at the wrong time in Ten Big Ones, the tenth gripping adventure in the Stephanie Plum series by Janet Evanovich. The perfect read for fans of Harlan Coben and Lee Child. Raves for Evanovich: 'No less than her plotting, Evanovich's characterisations are models of screwball artistry. The intricate plot machinery of her comic capers is fuelled by inventive twists' (The New York Times); 'A laugh-out-loud page-turner' (Heat); 'Non-stop laughs with plenty of high jinks' (USA Today).As the only witness able to ID a gang member who has been firebombing local deli-marts, Stephanie is working overtime avoiding death threats and attempts on her life. New Jersey's hottest cop, Joe Morelli, would be more than happy to keep her safe in his house. So would her irresistible mentor, Ranger.Stephanie doesn't know which is worse: the death threats, the overprotective men in her life, or her sister's nightmare wedding. But she does know that she's never been one to hide...What readers are saying about Ten Big Ones:'In classic Evanovich style, the writing is superb, the plot is miraculous and the emotions run right off the page''Packed with humour, suspense, passion and action, Ten Big Ones proves that Janet Evanovich is at the top of her game''Thrilling with a wicked sense of humour pervading the book'

Headline

The Devil's Domain

Paul Doherty
Authors:
Paul Doherty
Win a biscuiteer personalised tin and a signed copy of the book!

Day 3

A celebration is not a celebration without biscuits, so oday we’re offering one reader the chance to win a signed copy of A PLACE FOR US and a very special personalised tin of treats from biscuit-y artists Biscuiteers.

The final day!

Win Dermalogica skincare treats and a signed copy of the book!

Posted by Nicola Doherty

10 Top Tips for Los Angeles

If people ever ask me about my favourite holiday ever, I don’t even have to think twice. California, October 2011. We drove from Los Angeles to San Francisco – stopping off along the way at Santa Barbara wine country (as seen in the film Sideways), San Luis Obispo, Big Sur, Hearst Castle, and Monterey. I then stayed on in San Francisco for a further two weeks, writing my second book. Living the dream! It was easily the most memorable trip I’ve ever had and I’d do it all again in a heartbeat. Weirdly, one of my favourite parts of the trip was Los Angeles. LA has a bad reputation – you could easily imagine it’s a smoggy, tacky, endless sprawl full of identikit shopping malls. It can be all of those things but if you stay by the ocean, or go up in the hills, you’ll find a vibrant, arty, outdoorsy and endlessly fascinating place to explore. (It does help to be able to drive though, and have a GPS). I’d love to go back, but meanwhile I sent my heroine, Lily, there, for a family wedding that turns into a fabulous romantic adventure … Here are my top tips based on where Lily and I went: 1) Stay beside the beach – in Venice, Santa Monica, or (if you can afford it) Malibu. These places are also very handy from the airport. The Venice Beach House (where we stayed) is an adorable old-fashioned guest house that dates from the early 1900s; or try Shutters on the Beach for more updated luxe. 2) Hire a bike and cycle from Venice to Santa Monica (about two miles). You will see an unbelievable variety of local characters – think snake charmers, muscle men, rappers on segways and dogs on skateboards. 3) Be a culture vulture. Some people think there is no culture in Los Angeles. As Cher Horowitz would say: hello? As well as doing a Clueless tour, you can check out architecture by Frank Lloyd Wright, the John Paul Getty Museum, LA County Museum of Art, La Brea Tar Pits, the Watts Towers, Griffith Park Observatory ... or of course do the Walk of Fame on Hollywood Boulevard, where I met Actual Tom Cruise (though he may have been an impersonator because I don’t think the real Tom Cruise would accept tips). 4) Walk, don’t drive. Walk around the Venice canals which to my mind are just as pretty as the ones in Italy; hike in Runyon Park; or walk in Griffith Park where you can see the Hollywood sign AND the original Bat Cave! Or just get up early and go for a jog along the beach – you might see surfers out catching the morning swell, or photo shoot taking place, or (if you’re Lily) a cute boy out jogging barefoot … 5) Eat amazing food. You can keep up with the latest in the food truck craze at www.roaminghunger.com, or dine at Gwyneth Paltrow’s favourite restaurants (yes, Gwyneth – she really does know her food). 6) Go vintage shopping. I’m not sure if it’s the ageing hippies, the film costume departments or the Beverley Hills ladies who wear and discard, but LA is a treasure trove for vintage clothes. The Way We Wore and Hidden Treasures (which looks like a madhouse, at the top of Topanga Canyon) are two of the best. 7) Visit the flower market, where Lily and Jesse go shopping for wedding flowers. Fact fans note: Ashton Kutcher works here in the movie Valentine’s Day! 8) Head for the hills: explore Mulholland Drive and Laurel Canyon. We ended up there by mistake because we asked the GPS to ‘avoid motorways’ when leaving Los Angeles. It was scary at the time as it was late at night, very steep and we were totally lost, but hey, we saw Mulholland Drive. 9) Don’t stay downtown or at Chateau Marmont. The Chateau is lovely but it’s on a pretty tacky part of the Sunset Boulevard strip. But do go for a drink in Bar Marmont (just don’t get hammered and miss an important family party, the way Lily does). 10) You probably don’t need this one but: drink Californian wine. It is expensive compared to wine in Europe, but it is divine – plus they don’t export it much, so it’s something you can’t get at home. An excuse for a glass of Pinot Noir if ever I heard one … For more fun in Los Angeles, don't miss LILY DOES LA, out now in ebook. And be sure to catch the rest of the Girls on Tour...

Privacy Notice

11 Tips for Surviving a Festive Holiday

To celebrate the publication of MAGGIE DOES MERIBEL and because everyone always forgets to prep for the less shiny, happy parts to Christmas, Nicola Doherty has written the perfect guide to help us survive the festive period.

SARAH HILARY

Sarah Hilary's incredible debut crime novel, SOMEONE ELSE'S SKIN, is published on the 27th of February. We loved it so much we thought we'd invite Sarah along to be our author of the month, which means tackling the Crime Files quiz. Here's how she responded...

Paul Doherty

Paul Doherty was born in Middlesbrough. He studied History at Liverpool and Oxford Universities and obtained a doctorate for his thesis on Edward II and Queen Isabella. He is now headmaster of a school in north-east London and lives with his family in Essex.

Nicola Doherty

I'll Take Manhattan

To celebrate the release of the final instalment of the hilarious round-the-world GIRLS ON TOUR e-series THE GIRLS TAKE MANHATTAN, author Nicola Doherty gives us the low-down on the city's hot-spots.

Posted by Jo Liddiard

H is for History at Harrogate

We’re sponsoring three events over the weekend starting on Friday 23rd with Cloaks, Daggers and Masked Maurauders, a historical crime event, featuring Robert Goddard, Shona MacLean and Andrew Taylor, chaired by Imogen Robertson – author of THE PARIS WINTER and the Westerman and Crowther series for Headline. On Saturday 24th H for History sponsors Neil Oliver’s event and on Sunday 25th Melvyn Bragg’s. Each attendee at these events will receive a bumper H for History goody bags featuring samplers, bookmarks and postcards from across the four divisions, (Hodder, Headline, Quercus and Orion). Headline authors being promoted include Imogen Robertson, Simon Scarrow and Katherine Clements. There really is something for everyone – whether they’re a fiction or non-fiction reader, a roman fanatic or someone interested in something more modern.

Simon Scarrow

Simon Scarrow is a Sunday Times No. 1 bestselling author. His many successful books include his Eagles of the Empire novels featuring Roman soldiers Macro and Cato, most recently DAY OF THE CAESARS, INVICTUS, BRITANNIA and BROTHERS IN BLOOD, as well as HEARTS OF STONE, set in Greece during the Second World War, SWORD AND SCIMITAR, about the 1565 Siege of Malta, and a quartet about Wellington and Napoleon including the No. 1 Sunday Times bestseller THE FIELDS OF DEATH. He is the author with T. J. Andrews of the novels ARENA and INVADER.Find out more at www.simonscarrow.co.uk and on Facebook /officialsimonscarrow and Twitter @SimonScarrow

18 Aug
Portsmouth

Neil Gaiman at Portsmouth Guildhall

7:30pm

An Evening with Neil Gaiman at Portsmouth Guildhall, Guildhall Square, Portsmouth PO1 2AB Sunday 18 Aug 2013 - 7.30pm. £6 Neil Gaiman is an author, screenwriter, graphic novelist and all-round geek idol. Credited as one of the top living postmodern writers, and winner of the Newbery and Carnegie Medals, his works include The Sandman, Coraline, Stardust, American Gods, a Douglas Adams biography, and two episodes of Doctor Who. 1.8 million people follow him on Twitter. Born in Portsmouth, he currently lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts with his wife, the rock star Amanda Palmer. Neil will be celebrating the publication of his new novel: The Ocean at the End of the Lane. This will be Neil's first novel for adults since the Sunday Times bestseller Anansi Boys in 2005. He will be signing all copies of The Ocean at the End of the Lane plus one backlist title. This is an opportunity not to be missed so get your tickets as soon as possible!

21 Aug
Oxford

Neil Gaiman and Philip Pullman at the Oxford Playhouse

7:30pm
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Posted by Lucy Mangan, Author

Blog: Hopscotch and Handbags

It was supposed to be a spoof of the then massively popular Dangerous Book for Boys, by Conn and Hal Iggulden – which was a tome full of ideas for traditional games, hobbies, skills and adventures with Swiss Army knives, compasses, matches and fish-hooks, plus gobbets of knowledge about the likes of Captain Oates and Scott of the Antarctic that boys used to have at their command and might, the authors hoped, with a little encouragement and disregard for modern health and safety legislation, be resurrected amongst contemporary male youth. The problem with writing a spoof version for girls, I soon discovered, is that you can’t. The straight version is parody enough. Boys get – without too much of a strain on memory or contemporary mores – things like making paper boats and waterbombs, (non-paper) pinhole cameras and periscopes, building tree-houses, timers and tripwires, constructing bows and arrows, hunting and cooking rabbits and tanning their skins. Not only is it entertaining to read but it will also leave you better placed than a Montana survivalist come the apocalypse. Against that, what do girls have? Pom-pom making, French knitting (remember that? Looping wool between four pins stuck in a wooden reel until a worm-type thing emerged at the other end? Why? What was it for?) and keeping their knees together when they sit down. It made me think about the relative littleness of girls’ lives then and now, here, still, properly into the third millennium and all the inconsistencies, idiocies and plain daftnesses that come with growing up female. So I wrote Hopscotch & Handbags: the Truth About Being a Girl instead, got a few things off my chest and had a laugh along the way. No, wait – I mean, it’s a very serious work of feminist history. Regard, for example, this brief but entirely factually correct summary of girls’ education: “In ye olden times, girls did not go to school. If you were lucky enough to have a lettered mother who had not died in childbirth, she might teach you to read from the Bible, if your calloused hands could still turn the pages. Then things got better and by the 1950s girls were learning home economics. This is the pedagogic equivalent of French knitting. While we girls are fucking about with baking tins, the boys are off doing secret A-levels in the Arab-Israeli conflict and US politics. This is why, when you’re 30 and trying to have an intelligent conversation with friends around the dinner table you suddenly realise that men are no longer pretending to know 400 times more about everything than you – they actually do. John Craven needs to come out of retirement ASAP and start a Newsround for women. Incidentally, I believe home ec. is now called food science and is all about nutrition. It has basically turned into an anti-anorexia class in which girls are encouraged to make Nicole Richie models out of pastry and eat them.” You see? Get you through history GCSE that will, and probably a women’s paper or two at university as well if you pad it out a bit. It’s also a vital piece of social history, recording as it does that astonishingly underexamined period the 1980s (bringing to light such little known phenomena as Judy Blume’s Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret – to this day, I still believe that if I’d just put in a little extra effort with the “I must increase my bust” mantra, my life could have turned out very differently. By which I mean, incalculably better), the knotty mass of schoolgirl hierarchies, cliques and rivalries that makes a Tudor court look like a 60s kibbutz, the evolution of beauty aesthetics, fashion, sexual mores, the demands of motherhood, and the eternal brilliance of best friends, grandmas and Dolly Parton (who, apart from her prodigious musical talent must also now be feted for the fact that her commitment to both skyscraper heels and repeated breast enhancement means that since 1973 she has been staying upright by force of will alone). And because I like to be part of the solution as well as a miner of problems for cheap laughs, I also advise on how to improve your CV, avoid crying during job evaluations (betablockers. Throw them hard at your supervisor and run), lose weight (don’t diet – exercise. It is much harder to develop a disordered relationship with the treadmill than it is with food, if only because you tend not to keep ten types of delicious treadmill at home in the fridge) and cope with your mother (just keep taking the tablets. Both of you.) Anyway. I hope you enjoy the book. It may not be better than sex or shoes, but it is less messy and it goes with everything.