Related to: 'Alastair Dryburgh'

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How to Be a Grown-Up

Daisy Buchanan
Authors:
Daisy Buchanan
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How to Live Plastic Free

Luca Bonaccorsi
Authors:
Luca Bonaccorsi

Thank you for choosing this book - it shows that you care about the future of our planet.Whether you decide to go plastic free for an hour, a day or a year, this book will equip you with little steps we can each take to make a big difference.Let's turn the tide on plastic now - our oceans will thank you for it.Choking. Starving. Poisoning. This is what plastic litter is doing to marine life. Our oceans are, quite simply, facing environmental disaster. Yet by taking some simple steps and making a few changes to your daily routine, YOU can help to change this.How to Live Plastic Free will teach you everything you need to know about reducing your plastic usage on a daily basis. The chapters start with a typical morning routine and take you through your day, giving you tips and practical advice for removing unnecessary plastic at every possible opportunity.From the moment you wake up to the time you go to bed, you will learn how easy it can be to use plastic-free cosmetics, how to have plastic-free mealtimes, how to change your shopping habits and how to consider your use of plastic items at work. These simple, practical methods will show that small changes to your lifestyle can make a huge change to the future of our planet.#StopThePlasticTide

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Two Kitchens

Rachel Roddy
Authors:
Rachel Roddy
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Honeymoon Suite

Wendy Holden
Authors:
Wendy Holden

'[A] fun and fizzy romantic comedy' says the Daily Mail. Wendy Holden, the number one bestselling queen of romantic comedy, returns with a wonderfully warm and witty tale, guaranteed to delight her legions of fans. 'With plenty of laughter, love, fun and characters you really care about, this is the perfect companion for a weekend spent curled up on the sofa' Heat magazineWhen Nell is marooned at the altar, her feisty best friend Rachel says she'll come with her on honeymoon instead. Why waste a week in a posh country hotel?So the duo, plus Rachel's Agatha Christie-obsessed small daughter Juno, head for the hills and idyllic Edenville, on the edge of the beautiful Pemberton estate. Awaiting them is a cast of colourful characters from Jason the harassed hotel manager to the ruthless Angela, Director of HR. Not to mention the handsome Dylan, a bestselling writer on the run from his past. Nell doesn't want to go back to London, so when a job on the estate comes up, she's happy to stay. Even if it is arranging weddings in the Big House! As she becomes entangled in the lives of the locals - and they weave their way into her heart - she realises there might be a way to reach the rainbow's end after all

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Duke (Leopards of Normandy 2)

David Churchill
Authors:
David Churchill

**From the co-author of the No.1 bestselling Wilbur Smith novel, WAR CRY. **The Leopards of Normandy trilogy continues with Duke, as William of Normandy inherits his father's title and assumes command of his lands. This vibrant series by David Churchill will enthrall fans of Bernard Cornwell and Conn Iggulden. 'An exciting mix of medieval betrayal, violence and sex' Wilbur Smith.Normandy, 1037. Sparks fly from clashing swords as the game of thrones plays out in bloodshed. Of those named guardian to the boy Duke, all seek advantage and power. Most wish the boy dead. Some will go to any lengths to make it happen.Across the sea, the struggle for the English crown has seen Queen Emma's beloved son killed. She has two more sons waiting in the wings but Godwin, Earl of Wessex - kingmaker and arch manipulator - has other plans.As the noble families of Europe murder each other in their lust for power and fortune, the boy stands apart. His name is William. His destiny is to conquer.(P)2016 Headline Digital

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Peers Inc

Robin Chase
Authors:
Robin Chase

Renting your spare room via AirbnbSelling jewellery you've made on Etsy Learning a new language on DuoLingo Sending a message with WhatsAppFinding a date on TinderThese activities are all made possible by the new collaborative economy, and they are all examples of Peers Inc companies.A revolution has been happening in business. People are coming together with corporations to redefine how businesses work, transforming capitalism along the way. New web-enabled platforms (the Inc) are making it possible for peers to realise the potential of their excess capacity (their spare room, smartphones, experiences, free time or networks) to create exciting new ways to work and succeed.In this path-breaking book Robin Chase, co-founder of Zipcar, shows how Peers Inc companies are unlocking the power of the collaborative economy. And further she demonstrates how this revolution is extending beyond business, changing government and legacy companies and its potential to help solve large scale social problems - from disappearing jobs to climate change.

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The 80 Minute MBA

Richard Reeves, John Knell
Authors:
Richard Reeves, John Knell
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Making the Running

Ian Balding
Authors:
Ian Balding
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Bruno My Story

Bruno Tonioli
Authors:
Bruno Tonioli

Meet Bruno Tonioli - Strictly Come Dancing judge, wildcat choreographer and stardust magnet. With his irrepressible personality and Italian exuberance, Bruno has become a TV sensation, settling the fate of Britain's ballroom hopefuls during the nation's favourite Saturday night show.Bruno's journey is mind-blowing. He fled from home at eighteen to join the dance company La Grande Eugene and travelled around Europe; he later coached the actress Goldie Hawn as a dance instructor, and orchestrated lavish productions for TV, film and pop videos, where he worked alongside The Rolling Stones, Freddie Mercury, Duran Duran and Tina Turner.Along the way Bruno has Tangoed with high fashion, performed the Cha Cha Cha with untameable pop vixens Bananarama and danced an emotional Waltz with bereavement and breakdown before settling in the perfect location - a seat on the judging panel of Strictly Come Dancing, where he wowed the nation at home and in Hollywood with his passion for dance and an excitable turn of phrase.My Story tears away the glittery wrapping of this most exuberant and loveable of TV stars. Strap yourselves in for a wild and sexy ride with more frills than Versailles.

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Gypsy Princess

Violet Cannon
Authors:
Violet Cannon

The true story of a Romany childhood... Gypsy Princess is a searingly honest account of what life is really like for travelling communities, for girls in particular, and captures a way of life that is slowly fading away. If you enjoyed the memoirs of Mikey Walsh and Jess Smith, you'll be enthralled by Violet Cannon's biography. 'A fascinating and enjoyable insight into Gypsy life' - CloserA true blooded Gypsy, Violet Cannon grew up the Romany way. Life was tough at times, living in a cramped one-roomed trailer, but, unbound by strict routines, Violet spent her days learning to keep home, playing and roaming the fields with a sense of freedom long lost to the rest of modern society. Immersed in the Gypsy way of life, her childhood set her apart from other children. Bullied by classmates, and segregated from 'gorgia' kids (all non-Gypsies), Violet eventually left school at the age of nine to live a life of travel, play and learning under generations-old Gypsy rules on the fringes of society. With traditional values at the heart of her childhood, the pressure of conforming and marrying young was intense. Violet was duty-bound to find a husband, but would her marriage lead to the 'happy ever after' she grew up believing in as a Gypsy girl? What readers are saying about Gypsy Princess:'A fascinating and realistic look at what it means to be a Gypsy in today's society. A little understanding of Gypsy traditions goes a long way and I hope we see more biographies like this one''Violet is so likeable and warm, and the stories are written so vividly that you can really imagine yourself there' 'I could not put this book down - from the first paragraph I was hooked. I would love to read more about this fascinating lady and her family. By the end of the book I felt as if I knew them all'

Business Plus

Everything You Know About Business is Wrong

Alastair Dryburgh
Authors:
Alastair Dryburgh
Business Plus

Loose

Martin Thomas
Authors:
Martin Thomas

The way we do business has to change. One of the greatest weaknesses of many organisations is the delusion of being in control. The future is loose - loose organisations, loose management styles and loose ways of working. Author Martin Thomas describes how more open ways of thinking and operating are beginning to pervade even the largest and most complex institutions, from global corporations to government departments. There are limits to being loose, but freedom can exist within a framework.By building on cutting-edge case studies and conversations with the smartest business people from around the globe, LOOSE challenges received wisdom and explains new ways of managing companies, building brands, engaging with customer and marketing products and services. LOOSE will help you change you terms of business, before they are changed for you.

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It All Counts

Carol Vorderman
Authors:
Carol Vorderman

Carol Vorderman is everywoman: a single working mother, a businesswoman and a devoted daughter. And now, for the first time, she has decided to tell it like it is.Since 1982, Carol was much loved as co-presenter of Countdown with Richard Whiteley.  Joining the show at the age of twenty-one after her mother secretly posted off an application, she became the first woman to appear on Channel Four. Vorderman and Whiteley went on to form one of the most endearing partnerships in British TV history. His death in 2005 devastated Carol but she continued to present Countdown until July 2008, when, after twenty-six unbroken years with the show, it was announced that she was stepping down.Carol's life has been a rollercoaster. The youngest of three children, she was just three weeks old when her parents separated. Her father refused to acknowledge Carol, leaving her mother to hold down multiple jobs as the family's only provider. There was a stint in the circus; there have been two marriages; she has juggled a career with two children, whom she adores; she is a detox advocate and has hosted more shows than any other female presenter, including Tomorrow's World, Better Homes, Pride of Britain and, of course, Countdown.In IT ALL COUNTS, Carol tells the engrossing story of her life from an early age through to today - the personal struggles, the good times, the sad times, and lifts the lid on what really goes on behind the scenes in a TV studio and the full story behind her shocking Countdown departure. 

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It All Counts

Carol Vorderman
Authors:
Carol Vorderman

Carol Vorderman is everywoman: a single working mother, a businesswoman and a devoted daughter. And now, for the first time, she has decided to tell it like it is.Since 1982, Carol was much loved as co-presenter of Countdown with Richard Whiteley. Joining the show at the age of twenty-one after her mother secretly posted off an application, she became the first woman to appear on Channel Four. Vorderman and Whiteley went on to form one of the most endearing partnerships in British TV history. His death in 2005 devastated Carol but she continued to present Countdown until July 2008, when, after twenty-six unbroken years with the show, it was announced that she was stepping down.Carol's life has been a rollercoaster. The youngest of three children, she was just three weeks old when her parents separated. Her father refused to acknowledge Carol, leaving her mother to hold down multiple jobs as the family's only provider. There was a stint in the circus; there have been two marriages; she has juggled a career with two children, whom she adores; she is a detox advocate and has hosted more shows than any other female presenter, including Tomorrow's World, Better Homes, Pride of Britain and, of course, Countdown.In IT ALL COUNTS, Carol tells the engrossing story of her life from an early age through to today - the personal struggles, the good times, the sad times, and lifts the lid on what really goes on behind the scenes in a TV studio and the full story behind her shocking Countdown departure.

Business Plus

The Leadership Masterclass

Management Today, Emma De Vita
Authors:
Management Today, Emma De Vita

THE LEADERSHIP MASTERCLASS is business advice at its very best. Insightful, intelligent, thought-provoking and counter-intuitive, it will force you to rethink all aspects of your approach to leading your team or your company.There are five sections to chew over, which cover how to develop your very own leadership style, what the expected behaviours of the finest leaders are, the all-important strategy and how to initiate turnaround, change and set a vision, managing the reputation of yourself and your company and finally some lessons from those that have been there and done it.THE LEADERSHIP MASTERCLASS provides practical, no-nonsense advice for the incumbent or aspiring leader, particularly if you are eager to use fresh ideas to stake your claim as one of the next generation of great leaders. If you want to inspire those around you, stand out from the crowd and make a positive contribution, you need to read THE LEADERSHIP MASTERCLASS.

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Jack

Jack Welch
Authors:
Jack Welch

Privacy Notice

By Clemency Burton-Hill

New York, New York

Being a freelance writer has its upsides and its down; but an indisputable up is the ability to choose one’s office daily. As I write, I am sitting in a small café on Hudson and Charles, spotted on a whim as I crossed over the street from Seventh Avenue. It boasts walls of exposed old brick and studiedly shabby wooden furniture; a vinyl record of jazz turns on a gramophone in the corner. October sunlight slants lazily across the street and slinks in through the café windows, gilding a wall of analogue photographs depicting the proprietor’s great-grandparents in curling sepia. It is late 2012; the New York headquarters of some of the twenty-first-century’s most cutting-edge technology companies are in the vicinity; but with this chipped mug of coffee in my hands here and that Charlie Parker LP spinning there, I could be occupying the sort of contemplative corner spot that any number of human characters in New York may have occupied before me. Other years, other faces, other times. People sometimes complain that Greenwich Village, like much in Manhattan, has “altered beyond recognition” and I’m sure in many ways it has – it is in the very nature of this town; the very name of this town, to enshrine the possibility of change. But I also know, I feel intuitively, that there is still in these streets the unwavering spirit of the old city, catering generously and eternally to the needs of those whose hearts are open, curious and yearning. There’s no place like this on earth. In other words, New York’s still got it. **** When I turned eighteen, I was given a subscription to the New Yorker for my birthday. A decade later, almost to the day, I moved to Manhattan and for the first few months I lived here, the simplest and most wondrous of the inestimable gifts this city bestows seemed to be this: that I could open those storied pages, flip to Goings On About Town, and, if I so desired, “go on about town”. I could read about a jazz gig, a book reading, a film opening, a symphony or rock concert, an opera, a play, a new restaurant and, bank balance permitting, experience it that same night. Back in my hometown of London – itself a city not without wonder – reading the Goings On section of the New Yorker became a weekly act of masochism, yielding predictable twists of almost palpable longing. To read about what was happening that same night across the Atlantic; to dream, to imagine, but to only be able to imagine – to not be in New York was sometimes too much to bear. Yet this is a city that has always been created by the imagination; a metropolis lovingly constructed in ink and paper and celluloid and dreams as much as it is by bricks and mortar, steel and glass. To borrow an insight from that master observer of New York, E. B. White, there are roughly three New Yorks: that of the natives, that of the commuters, and that of the settlers. That notion was true when White wrote “Here is New York” in 1948, and it strikes me as being resoundingly true today. Like him, I believe that the third New York will always be the most important, the most vital, because it is the one whose foundations are laid first in the minds of human beings born and living elsewhere – those for whom New York City is the ultimate destination. When the settler-dreamers hit the bedrock, having crossed bodies of water, been coughed up through tubes or tunnels or deposited by planes, it is up to them – to us – to turn those dreams into something resembling reality. And because New York has a unique capacity to absorb whatever is thrown at it and whomever arrives on its shores, they invariably do play their own unique part in shaping what happens next in the mighty pageant that is life here. Although, not always: New York also spits out more dejected and disappointed souls than any other city on earth. We transplanted “New Yorkers” must also live with the lurking shadow of that possibility every day. **** The music fades, the needle lifts, and a bearded barista with complicated tattoos on his forearms whom I’d wager lives in Brooklyn goes to flip the record to its B-Side. Which reminds me of a startling fact: the first jazz disc ever to be cut in the world was cut in New York. Ever in the world! It was Nick La Rocca’s Original Dixieland Jazz Band with “Livery Stable Blues”, in early 1917. But I plucked that particular “first” from the sky; really it’s not so startling – New York is a city of firsts. A city of human beings calmly doing things that will forever alter the direction of how those things can be done. From sculptors to subway contractors; from traders of sundries to traders of derivatives; from writers of music to writers of insurance to writers of code. Right now, I wonder, how many blocks am I from wonder? A short stroll in any direction and I might run into a movie crew shooting on a corner of Bleecker whose young director, as yet unknown, will win an Oscar next year; I might walk past an innocuous office building on Houston in which employees at a start-up whose name we’ve never heard of are busy inventing the next game-changing technology that we will soon all take for granted; I may glance at construction workers on a downtown skyscraper site whose silhouette will one day be a byword, a metaphor, a symbol for something the whole world understands – or maybe will just be a building so beautiful it makes people weep. This guy sitting next to me, meanwhile, tapping away on his laptop; for all I know he could be writing the world’s next Booker-winning novel. This is New York. Since arriving at this café, moreover, I have seen through these sunlit windows every sort of human face pass along Hudson Street. Even here, in this achingly well-heeled neighborhood where a brownstone townhouse around the corner on Perry is apparently on the market at fifteen million dollars (“What the hell – I’ll take two!”) I have seen faces old and young; faces black and brown and pink and white and many shades of grey. Faces beautiful and completely unmemorable; faces brimful of life; faces seemingly close to death. Perhaps these faces come from Puerto Rico, from Sierra Leone, from Mexico, England, Haiti, Cuba, Latvia, Kenya, Russia, Ireland or Italy. Perhaps from China, Tunisia, Wales, India, Jamaica, New Zealand, Greece or Poland. Perhaps they were born in a gleaming hospital uptown, or in a railroad apartment in an outer borough; perhaps they were born half way around the world. But here in New York they are. And as White memorably observed: “the collision and the intermingling of these millions of foreign-born people representing so many races and creeds make New York a permanent exhibit of the phenomenon of one world.” The phenomenon of one world. We know all this, of course. New York as a racial melting pot, a magnet for all comers, a global crucible of creativity: all of this has been said in myriad ways, by multitudes and over many years. But just as New York has every type of potential racial problem and for the most part enjoys a continuing and frankly miraculous city-wide tolerance, an “inviolate truce” between peoples, what astounds me is how the things we know about the city – the clichés and stereotypes, the myths and legends – go on being true, and indeed, get truer. Why? How? How do you work, New York? How are you even plausible? **** When you tell people you live in New York, I have found, reactions generally divide into those whose eyes widen with envy and those who wrinkle their brows in horror – or, worse, pity. “Oh no,” they shake their head, “I could never live there – so noisy, so dirty, so smelly. And why does everyone have to be so unbelievably rude?” There are also those who grumble that New York has somehow lost its character; been homogenised and commercialised and overrun by identical shops, adverts and tourists who genuinely appear to think queuing outside Abercrombie & Fitch a valid use of time. Well, yes. Surely Broadway has its grim bits; clearly one does well to avoid Times Square. Obviously you ignore the horse-and-cart guys in Central Park and of course you don’t eat at Olive Garden or wait forty-five minutes for a Magnolia Bakery cupcake. And of course New York is smelly and dirty and busy and crowded. If White thought in 1948 that “the normal frustrations of modern life are here multiplied and amplified” he would possibly be dismayed (but not surprised) to discover that more than half a century on there is still “not enough air and not enough light, and there is usually either too much heat or too little”. But in general, I believe, New York still has more life and curiosity and character in a single city block than even – dare I say it – London. And I’m a born and bred London girl who once suspected that if you were to cut my veins I would bleed the Thames. (I have also lived in Paris, and - hit me over the head with a baguette – I’m afraid that glorious capital does not compare either.) For more than three years, for example, my local Subway stop has been Grand Central. Rushing across the Main Concourse before I head underground to catch a train, I try always to look up at the ceiling and promise myself I will never, ever take such a sight for granted. When back in London, equally, I remind myself not to sigh in inevitable disappointment when I board the Piccadilly Line to go home. It’s a grossly unfair comparison, of course: how could poor old Hammersmith, my local Tube, ever hope to win against those majestic cathedral glories on 42nd Street? But that’s the point, isn’t it? **** In January 2012, the population of the entire New York City metropolitan area hit nineteen million people. It can be lonely here; sometimes unutterably so: a teeming place of human isolation and even desperation. By Grand Central Station I have indeed sat down and wept. But as White also captured brilliantly: “Although New York often imparts a feeling of great forlornness or forsakenness… you always feel that either by shifting your location ten blocks or by reducing your fortune by five dollars you can experience rejuvenation.” Reducing one’s fortune by five dollars here, by the way, remains the easiest damn thing in the world. Another cup of coffee at this very café, especially if accompanied by one of those artisanal sea-salt cookies they bake downstairs, will barely leave me change from twice that. In a doorway down the street, some wit has stuck a poster referencing the iconic slogan: I CAN’T AFFORD TO  NY. It has probably never been more difficult or more expensive to live in New York. Yet I and so many others would not be anywhere else in the world. Shifting my location, I will take my five bucks and get another coffee at some other place, ten blocks away, twenty, or who knows where. It doesn’t matter where I go: I open the door and the universe awaits. CLEMENCY BURTON-HIL, NEW YORK CITY, OCTOBER 2012

Luca Bonaccorsi

Luca Bonaccorsi (author) is a journalist, campaigner, economist and environmentalist with over twenty years of international experience. Luca has investigated environmental crimes and disasters in various areas of the world such as Afghanistan, Laos, the Gulf of Thailand, the Gulf of Mexico, South Africa, Lebanon and Italy. He has edited national publications, hosted radio and TV programs. He is currently the Director of Engagement and Communications at the Marine Conservation Society.Richard Harrington (author) is a marine biologist, passionate about rocky seashores and shallow seas. He has previously worked as a warden on the stunning St Mary's Island, and worked with young people and volunteers for the RSPB. Richard writes for Coast magazine, and is currently Head of Communications at the Marine Conservation Society.Clare Fischer (author) is a former BBC broadcaster, who spent almost twenty years presenting, producing and reporting for local radio. Trained at the London College of Printing, she joined the BBC via local newspapers and commercial radio. She presented across the day including Breakfast, Mid-Morning, Afternoon and Drivetime shows. She is currently PR Manager at the Marine Conservation Society.

Ethan Willis

Ethan Willis is the CEO of Prosper and has been recognized as Entrepreneur of the Year by Ernst and Young in 2005 and as one of the Top 100 Entrepreneurs by Vspring. His work in the field of entrepreneurship has been featured in such media as BusinessWeek, USA Today, and CNBC. He is coauthor of the #1 New York Times Business bestselling book The One Minute Entrepreneur with his friend and mentor Ken Blanchard. He is an Alumni of BYU and Harvard Business School.