Related to: 'Adam Hamdy'

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The Hunter

Andrew Reid
Authors:
Andrew Reid

'REID'S DEBUT HITS LIKE A SPIN-KICK...RAZOR-SHARP ACTION FROM START TO FINISH.' James Swallow, bestselling author of NOMAD.'TOP DRAWER STUFF, AND SHOULD GIVE LEE CHILD AND SIMON KERNICK A FEW SLEEPLESS NIGHTS.' James Oswald, author of the bestselling Inspector McLean Series.THE HUNTER is an explosive, heart-pounding debut thriller that splices the electrifying action of Terry Hayes' I AM PILGRIM and Gregg Hurwitz's ORPHAN X - with a hero as deadly as Jason Bourne.----A troubled genius who vanishes in a mysterious car crash.A disillusioned cop sensing conspiracy in the corridors of power.A ruthless team of mercenaries operating in the shadows.A billion-dollar business that wants the world in its grip.One link connects them all.A champion fighter. Betrayed and searching for the truth.Cameron King is The Hunter.'AN EXHILARATING, ACTION-PACKED, GRIPPING TALE...A REAL PAGE TURNER THAT THRILLS AND ENTERTAINS FROM START TO FINISH.' Adam Hamdy, author of the PENDULUM series.*****A nerve-shredding, breathless ride full of twists and turns, THE HUNTER is perfect for fans of Lee Child's JACK REACHER, Jason Matthew's RED SPARROW and Rob Sinclair's SLEEPER 13.

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Aftershock

Adam Hamdy
Authors:
Adam Hamdy
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Hunted

G X Todd
Authors:
G X Todd

'Thrilling . . . Todd skilfully captures hope and humanity in the lives of characters whom the reader comes to care about: Hunted, like Defender, is an impressive achievement' GuardianHunted is the second novel in the highly acclaimed Voices series by G X Todd, following the spectacular debut Defender, highlighted by the Independent as being 'of a piece with Stephen King's The Stand'. The battle between Good and Evil continues to play out in a world where the Voice in your head can save or slaughter you. A must-read for fans of Neil Gaiman and Joe Hill.'Hunted is a smart, fast-paced, brave and classy thriller' Gillian McAllister'Compelling, suspenseful and altogether extraordinary' Lee Child'Hunted is a masterfully written, gripping read . . . A beautifully dark, twisted world that is rich in character and authenticity' Adam HamdyThe birds are flying. The birds are flocking. The birds sense the red skies are coming.One man is driven by an inner voice that isn't his - this Other is chewing at his sanity like a jackal with a bone and has one purpose.To find the voice hiding in the girl. She has no one to defend her now. But in an inn by the sea, a boy with no tongue and no voice gathers his warriors. Albus must find the girl, Lacey . . . before the Other does. And finish the work his sister Ruby began.Hunted is the second book in the acclaimed Voices series, where the battle between Good and Evil holds you in its vice-like grip.#HearTheVoices

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Freefall

Adam Hamdy
Authors:
Adam Hamdy

ONE RULE. TRUST NO-ONE.Adam Hamdy's debut PENDULUM was called 'one of the best thrillers of the year' by JAMES PATTERSON. This pulse-racing read is perfect for fans of Lee Child and Simon Kernick.'FREEFALL IS A RELENTLESS, ADRENALINE-CHARGED THRILLER THAT GRIPS FROM THE FIRST PAGE' Daily ExpressJOHN WALLACE IS A TARGETHiding off-grid after exposing the shadowy Pendulum conspiracy, Wallace is horrified to discover he is still marked for death.THERE ARE ONLY TWO PEOPLE HE CAN TRUSTDI Patrick Bailey is still reeling from the murder investigation that nearly cost him his life. FBI Agent Christine Ash is hunting a serial killer with a link to an unfinished caseHE MUST FIND THE TRUTHThe death of a London journalist triggers an investigation that brings them back together, hurling them into the path of an unknown enemy.BEFORE THE KILLER FINDS HIMHunted across the world, they are plunged into a nightmare deadlier than they could have ever imagined.'SO TENSE, YOU WILL BE BITING YOUR NAILS LONG BEFORE THE FINAL CHAPTER.' The Sun

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Pendulum

Adam Hamdy
Authors:
Adam Hamdy

James Patterson has hailed Adam Hamdy's PENDULUM as 'one of the best thrillers of the year' saying he read it in 'one gloriously suspenseful weekend'. A photo-journalist is targeted for death in this high-concept, twisting, dangerous journey through a digital underworld. If you love Simon Kernick and Terry Hayes' I AM PILGRIM, read this.You wake. Confused. Disorientated.A noose is round your neck. You are bound, standing on a chair.All you can focus on is the man in the mask tightening the rope.You are about to die.John Wallace has no idea why he has been targeted. No idea who his attacker is. No idea how he will prevent the inevitable. Then the pendulum of fate swings in his favour. He has one chance to escape, find the truth and halt his destruction. The momentum is in his favour for now. But with a killer on his tail, everything can change with one swing of this deadly pendulum...You have one chance. Run.

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Run

Adam Hamdy
Authors:
Adam Hamdy
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The Scam

Janet Evanovich, Lee Goldberg
Authors:
Janet Evanovich, Lee Goldberg

Janet Evanovich's novels are: 'Pithy, witty and fast-paced' (The Sunday Times); 'Non-stop laughs with plenty of high jinks' (USA Today); 'Razor-sharp' (Sunday Express) He's on the run. She's an FBI agent. But putting Nick Fox in gaol is the last thing on Kate O'Hare's mind...Nicolas Fox is a charming con man and master thief. Kate O'Hare is the FBI agent on his trail. At least that's what everyone thinks. In reality, they're secretly working together to bring down super-criminals. Criminals like brutal casino magnate Evan Trace.Evan Trace is running a money-laundering operation through his casino. Some of his best customers are mobsters, dictators, and global terrorists. Nick and Kate are going deep undercover as high-stakes gamblers, wagering millions of dollars - and their lives - in an attempt to topple Trace's empire.The scam will take Fox and O'Hare from the Las Vegas strip, to the sun-soaked beaches of Hawaii, and into the dark back alleys of Macau. Their only backup - a self-absorbed actor, a Somali pirate, and an ex-soldier who believes a rocket launcher is the best way to solve every problem. What could possibly go wrong?

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Toast & Marmalade

Emma Bridgewater
Authors:
Emma Bridgewater
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The Job

Janet Evanovich, Lee Goldberg
Authors:
Janet Evanovich, Lee Goldberg
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The Heist

Janet Evanovich, Lee Goldberg
Authors:
Janet Evanovich, Lee Goldberg

Raves for Janet Evanovich's novels: 'Stephanie Plum in ass-kicking form...utterly delightful' (Cosmopolitan); 'A laugh-out-loud page turner' (Heat); 'Plum is not just a smart private eye but a heroine with a sense of humour' (Daily Mail) An impossible pairing. An unstoppable team.Conman and expert thief Nick Fox is responsible for some of the most daring heists of recent years. Now he's responsible for driving FBI Special Agent, Kate O'Hare crazy as they work together to take down some of the world's most untouchable felons.Nick and Kate's first assignment: to track down one of the most notorious embezzlers in the world - along with the $500 million he stole on his way out of the country. It's going to include hardships like travelling to an island paradise, living on a yacht, and dinner theatre. And if Nick is turning out to look a lot like the man of Kate's dreams... well, that can only be expected when you're having fun parachuting into forbidden territory, setting off explosives and playing the part of a honey trap...

Business Plus

Resilience

Andrew Zolli, Ann Marie Healy
Authors:
Andrew Zolli, Ann Marie Healy

All systems break down. Some bounce back, others do not. This is a book about why.RESILIENCE is a book about how the world works. It covers business, economic, geographic and social systems in a thrillingly readable narrative. A wealth of absorbing examples are covered, from the link between US oil prices and the recent 'tortilla riots' in Mexico to what was really happening when the US government decided not to bail out Lehman Bros. RESILIENCE introduces completely new ideas, such as 'flipping' which is when a systems has been pulled out of shape so often it changes forever. The thinking in RESILIENCE has crucial implications for how to understand the world in which we live.

Hachette Scotland

101 World Whiskies to Try Before You Die

Ian Buxton
Authors:
Ian Buxton

101 WORLD WHISKIES TO TRY BEFORE YOU DIE is the companion guide to 2010's 101 WHISKIES TO TRY BEFORE YOU DIE. Ian Buxton again eschews the obvious whiskies and recommends another 101 whiskies that he believes every whisky lover should taste.In Ian Buxton's new collection of whisky recommendations he has cast his net wider. He includes not only whiskies from the established whisky-producing countries, but also many newcomers. The book includes whiskies from Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, England, Finland, France, Germany, Holland, India, Ireland, Japan, Scotland, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, USA and Wales.All the whiskies included are both affordable and accessible. Ian Buxton does not believe in collecting whiskies or investing in whisky. He believes in tasting and enjoying the huge range of whiskies that are available. The book includes single malts and blends - and provocatively a few renegade suggestions that are bound to offend purists.

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Globality

Harold L. Sirkin, James W. Hemerling, Arindam K. Bhattacharya
Authors:
Harold L. Sirkin, James W. Hemerling, Arindam K. Bhattacharya

Globality primarily involves large western corporations expanding their operations and moving aggressively into new overseas markets. GLOBALITY radically defines a 'post-globalization' world, where companies from India, China, Russia, eastern Europe, Brazil and Mexico are expanding beyond their home base, entering and building new markets, creating whole industries, and competing for customers, resources, market share and attention. In short, the tide has turned. As a result, western companies need to understand these emerging new businesses and the economies they come from in order to stay ahead and stay alive.

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Michael Douglas: Acting on Instinct

John Parker
Authors:
John Parker

In the shadow of his father Kirk's overpowering fame, Michael Douglas forged a career for himself and became recognised in his own right as an award-winning actor and producer. But fame has taken its toll on Michael's personal life. His struggles with sexual addiction, his treatment for alcoholism and drug dependency and the break-up of his first marriage show another side to Michael's success. In 2010, his troubled past came back to haunt him when Cameron, his eldest son, was sentenced to five years in prison for drug dealing. Yet, despite a rocky road, Michael has found happiness later in life. His marriage to Catherine Zeta Jones meant a second shot at fatherhood and gave him strength following a devastating diagnosis of advanced throat cancer at the age of 65. This is the compelling and remarkable story of a Hollywood son who waged a battle against the odds to achieve his fame and fortune, and has kept on fighting with every challenge he faces.

Business Plus

Loose

Martin Thomas
Authors:
Martin Thomas

The way we do business has to change. One of the greatest weaknesses of many organisations is the delusion of being in control. The future is loose - loose organisations, loose management styles and loose ways of working. Author Martin Thomas describes how more open ways of thinking and operating are beginning to pervade even the largest and most complex institutions, from global corporations to government departments. There are limits to being loose, but freedom can exist within a framework.By building on cutting-edge case studies and conversations with the smartest business people from around the globe, LOOSE challenges received wisdom and explains new ways of managing companies, building brands, engaging with customer and marketing products and services. LOOSE will help you change you terms of business, before they are changed for you.

Headline Review

Arnhem: Jumping the Rhine 1944 & 1945

Lloyd Clark
Authors:
Lloyd Clark

An insightful and gripping account of the largest airborne operation in history. In September 1944, the river Rhine was a serious barrier to the advancing Allied armies in the West who were intent on charging Berlin and ending the war. Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery decided to utilise the First Allied Airborne Army consisting of British, American and Polish troops. Codenamed Operation Market Garden, 40,000 paratroopers were dropped behind enemy lines while ground forces linked to relieve them. But, due to bad weather and German resistance, the operation failed. In March 1945, asecond attempt was planned: Operation Varsity Plunder. This time the plan worked. Despite extremely heavy fighting, they cracked the German line.

James H Jackson

An international defence and Political Risk Consultant, James H. Jackson continues to advise a wide range of global clients on overseas trade and security matters. He is a postgraduate in military studies, with further university and professional qualifications in law, politics and as a barrister. He lectures and writes extensively on a variety of specialist subjects including low-intensity conflict and arms trade issues.

By Clemency Burton-Hill

New York, New York

Being a freelance writer has its upsides and its down; but an indisputable up is the ability to choose one’s office daily. As I write, I am sitting in a small café on Hudson and Charles, spotted on a whim as I crossed over the street from Seventh Avenue. It boasts walls of exposed old brick and studiedly shabby wooden furniture; a vinyl record of jazz turns on a gramophone in the corner. October sunlight slants lazily across the street and slinks in through the café windows, gilding a wall of analogue photographs depicting the proprietor’s great-grandparents in curling sepia. It is late 2012; the New York headquarters of some of the twenty-first-century’s most cutting-edge technology companies are in the vicinity; but with this chipped mug of coffee in my hands here and that Charlie Parker LP spinning there, I could be occupying the sort of contemplative corner spot that any number of human characters in New York may have occupied before me. Other years, other faces, other times. People sometimes complain that Greenwich Village, like much in Manhattan, has “altered beyond recognition” and I’m sure in many ways it has – it is in the very nature of this town; the very name of this town, to enshrine the possibility of change. But I also know, I feel intuitively, that there is still in these streets the unwavering spirit of the old city, catering generously and eternally to the needs of those whose hearts are open, curious and yearning. There’s no place like this on earth. In other words, New York’s still got it. **** When I turned eighteen, I was given a subscription to the New Yorker for my birthday. A decade later, almost to the day, I moved to Manhattan and for the first few months I lived here, the simplest and most wondrous of the inestimable gifts this city bestows seemed to be this: that I could open those storied pages, flip to Goings On About Town, and, if I so desired, “go on about town”. I could read about a jazz gig, a book reading, a film opening, a symphony or rock concert, an opera, a play, a new restaurant and, bank balance permitting, experience it that same night. Back in my hometown of London – itself a city not without wonder – reading the Goings On section of the New Yorker became a weekly act of masochism, yielding predictable twists of almost palpable longing. To read about what was happening that same night across the Atlantic; to dream, to imagine, but to only be able to imagine – to not be in New York was sometimes too much to bear. Yet this is a city that has always been created by the imagination; a metropolis lovingly constructed in ink and paper and celluloid and dreams as much as it is by bricks and mortar, steel and glass. To borrow an insight from that master observer of New York, E. B. White, there are roughly three New Yorks: that of the natives, that of the commuters, and that of the settlers. That notion was true when White wrote “Here is New York” in 1948, and it strikes me as being resoundingly true today. Like him, I believe that the third New York will always be the most important, the most vital, because it is the one whose foundations are laid first in the minds of human beings born and living elsewhere – those for whom New York City is the ultimate destination. When the settler-dreamers hit the bedrock, having crossed bodies of water, been coughed up through tubes or tunnels or deposited by planes, it is up to them – to us – to turn those dreams into something resembling reality. And because New York has a unique capacity to absorb whatever is thrown at it and whomever arrives on its shores, they invariably do play their own unique part in shaping what happens next in the mighty pageant that is life here. Although, not always: New York also spits out more dejected and disappointed souls than any other city on earth. We transplanted “New Yorkers” must also live with the lurking shadow of that possibility every day. **** The music fades, the needle lifts, and a bearded barista with complicated tattoos on his forearms whom I’d wager lives in Brooklyn goes to flip the record to its B-Side. Which reminds me of a startling fact: the first jazz disc ever to be cut in the world was cut in New York. Ever in the world! It was Nick La Rocca’s Original Dixieland Jazz Band with “Livery Stable Blues”, in early 1917. But I plucked that particular “first” from the sky; really it’s not so startling – New York is a city of firsts. A city of human beings calmly doing things that will forever alter the direction of how those things can be done. From sculptors to subway contractors; from traders of sundries to traders of derivatives; from writers of music to writers of insurance to writers of code. Right now, I wonder, how many blocks am I from wonder? A short stroll in any direction and I might run into a movie crew shooting on a corner of Bleecker whose young director, as yet unknown, will win an Oscar next year; I might walk past an innocuous office building on Houston in which employees at a start-up whose name we’ve never heard of are busy inventing the next game-changing technology that we will soon all take for granted; I may glance at construction workers on a downtown skyscraper site whose silhouette will one day be a byword, a metaphor, a symbol for something the whole world understands – or maybe will just be a building so beautiful it makes people weep. This guy sitting next to me, meanwhile, tapping away on his laptop; for all I know he could be writing the world’s next Booker-winning novel. This is New York. Since arriving at this café, moreover, I have seen through these sunlit windows every sort of human face pass along Hudson Street. Even here, in this achingly well-heeled neighborhood where a brownstone townhouse around the corner on Perry is apparently on the market at fifteen million dollars (“What the hell – I’ll take two!”) I have seen faces old and young; faces black and brown and pink and white and many shades of grey. Faces beautiful and completely unmemorable; faces brimful of life; faces seemingly close to death. Perhaps these faces come from Puerto Rico, from Sierra Leone, from Mexico, England, Haiti, Cuba, Latvia, Kenya, Russia, Ireland or Italy. Perhaps from China, Tunisia, Wales, India, Jamaica, New Zealand, Greece or Poland. Perhaps they were born in a gleaming hospital uptown, or in a railroad apartment in an outer borough; perhaps they were born half way around the world. But here in New York they are. And as White memorably observed: “the collision and the intermingling of these millions of foreign-born people representing so many races and creeds make New York a permanent exhibit of the phenomenon of one world.” The phenomenon of one world. We know all this, of course. New York as a racial melting pot, a magnet for all comers, a global crucible of creativity: all of this has been said in myriad ways, by multitudes and over many years. But just as New York has every type of potential racial problem and for the most part enjoys a continuing and frankly miraculous city-wide tolerance, an “inviolate truce” between peoples, what astounds me is how the things we know about the city – the clichés and stereotypes, the myths and legends – go on being true, and indeed, get truer. Why? How? How do you work, New York? How are you even plausible? **** When you tell people you live in New York, I have found, reactions generally divide into those whose eyes widen with envy and those who wrinkle their brows in horror – or, worse, pity. “Oh no,” they shake their head, “I could never live there – so noisy, so dirty, so smelly. And why does everyone have to be so unbelievably rude?” There are also those who grumble that New York has somehow lost its character; been homogenised and commercialised and overrun by identical shops, adverts and tourists who genuinely appear to think queuing outside Abercrombie & Fitch a valid use of time. Well, yes. Surely Broadway has its grim bits; clearly one does well to avoid Times Square. Obviously you ignore the horse-and-cart guys in Central Park and of course you don’t eat at Olive Garden or wait forty-five minutes for a Magnolia Bakery cupcake. And of course New York is smelly and dirty and busy and crowded. If White thought in 1948 that “the normal frustrations of modern life are here multiplied and amplified” he would possibly be dismayed (but not surprised) to discover that more than half a century on there is still “not enough air and not enough light, and there is usually either too much heat or too little”. But in general, I believe, New York still has more life and curiosity and character in a single city block than even – dare I say it – London. And I’m a born and bred London girl who once suspected that if you were to cut my veins I would bleed the Thames. (I have also lived in Paris, and - hit me over the head with a baguette – I’m afraid that glorious capital does not compare either.) For more than three years, for example, my local Subway stop has been Grand Central. Rushing across the Main Concourse before I head underground to catch a train, I try always to look up at the ceiling and promise myself I will never, ever take such a sight for granted. When back in London, equally, I remind myself not to sigh in inevitable disappointment when I board the Piccadilly Line to go home. It’s a grossly unfair comparison, of course: how could poor old Hammersmith, my local Tube, ever hope to win against those majestic cathedral glories on 42nd Street? But that’s the point, isn’t it? **** In January 2012, the population of the entire New York City metropolitan area hit nineteen million people. It can be lonely here; sometimes unutterably so: a teeming place of human isolation and even desperation. By Grand Central Station I have indeed sat down and wept. But as White also captured brilliantly: “Although New York often imparts a feeling of great forlornness or forsakenness… you always feel that either by shifting your location ten blocks or by reducing your fortune by five dollars you can experience rejuvenation.” Reducing one’s fortune by five dollars here, by the way, remains the easiest damn thing in the world. Another cup of coffee at this very café, especially if accompanied by one of those artisanal sea-salt cookies they bake downstairs, will barely leave me change from twice that. In a doorway down the street, some wit has stuck a poster referencing the iconic slogan: I CAN’T AFFORD TO  NY. It has probably never been more difficult or more expensive to live in New York. Yet I and so many others would not be anywhere else in the world. Shifting my location, I will take my five bucks and get another coffee at some other place, ten blocks away, twenty, or who knows where. It doesn’t matter where I go: I open the door and the universe awaits. CLEMENCY BURTON-HIL, NEW YORK CITY, OCTOBER 2012

John Parker

John Parker, a journalist and former Fleet Street editor, has undertaken many investigative projects in his writing career with topics ranging from the Mafia to Northern Ireland. His numerous books include several military bestsellers including THE GURKHAS, DEATH OF A HERO and SBS: THE INSIDE STORY OF THE SPECIAL BOAT SERVICE.

THE HEIST

Our ebook of the month is THE HEIST, the first adventure in an electrifying new series from Janet Evanovich and Lee Goldberg.