Related to: 'Jennifer E. Smith'

Headline

Hello, Goodbye, And Everything In Between

Jennifer E. Smith
Authors:
Jennifer E. Smith

One night. A life-changing decision. And a list...Of course Clare made a list. She creates lists for everything. That's just how she is.But tonight is Clare and Aidan's last night before college and this list will decide their future, together or apart.It takes them on a rollercoaster ride through their past - from the first hello in science class to the first conversation at a pizza joint, their first kiss at the beach and their first dance in a darkened gymnasium - all the way up to tonight.A night of laughs, fresh hurts, last-minute kisses and an inevitable goodbye.But will it be goodbye forever or goodbye for now?

Headline

The Geography Of You And Me

Jennifer E. Smith
Authors:
Jennifer E. Smith

For fans of John Green, Stephanie Perkins and Sarah Ockler, THE GEOGRAPHY OF YOU AND ME is a story for anyone who's ever longed to meet someone special, for anyone who's searched for home and found it where they least expected it.Owen lives in the basement. Lucy lives on the 24th floor. But when the power goes out in the midst of a New York heatwave, they find themselves together for the first time: stuck in a lift between the 10th and 11th floors. As they await help, they start talking... The brief time they spend together leaves a mark. And as their lives take them to Edinburgh and San Francisco, to Prague and to Portland they can't shake the memory of the time they shared. Postcards cross the globe when they themselves can't, as Owen and Lucy experience the joy - and pain - of first love. And as they make their separate journeys in search of home, they discover that sometimes it is a person rather than a place that anchors you most in the world.

Headline

The Ocean at the End of the Lane

Neil Gaiman
Authors:
Neil Gaiman

WINNER OF THE SPECSAVERS NATIONAL BOOK AWARDS 2013 BOOK OF THE YEAR The Ocean at the End of the Lane is the bestselling magical novel from Neil Gaiman, one of the most brilliant storytellers of our generation and author of the epic novel American Gods, and the much-loved Sandman series. 'Possibly Gaiman's most lyrical, scary and beautiful work yet. It's a tale of childhood for grown-ups, a fantasy rooted in the darkest corners of reality' (Independent on Sunday). If you loved the mesmerising world of Erin Morgenstern's The Night Circus or were drawn into J.K. Rowling's magical universe, this book is for you. It began for our narrator forty years ago when the family lodger stole their car and committed suicide in it, stirring up ancient powers best left undisturbed. Dark creatures from beyond this world are on the loose, and it will take everything our narrator has just to stay alive: there is primal horror here, and menace unleashed - within his family and from the forces that have gathered to destroy it. His only defence is three women, on a farm at the end of the lane. The youngest of them claims that her duckpond is an ocean. The oldest can remember the Big Bang.The Ocean at the End of the Lane is a fable that reshapes modern fantasy: moving, terrifying and elegiac - as pure as a dream, as delicate as a butterfly's wing, as dangerous as a knife in the dark.

Headline Eternal

What a Boy Wants

Nyrae Dawn
Authors:
Nyrae Dawn
Headline Eternal

What a Boy Needs

Nyrae Dawn
Authors:
Nyrae Dawn

If you love Jennifer E. Smith's The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight and Jessica Park's Flat-Out Love, you'll love this book.Jaden Sinclair knows he'll never amount to anything...so why would he deserve a girl like Priscilla Mendoza? Since last summer, things have been screwed up between Jaden and Pris. He knows it's his fault, but that doesn't stop him from wanting to go a few rounds with her new boyfriend. He also knows he's the loser his dad calls him, but it doesn't stop him from wanting her.After getting a huge bomb dropped on him, Jaden lashes out and lands himself in jail. Everything in his chaotic life is turned upside down and to make it worse, his mom kicks him out in order to side with his dad. Yeah, he's totally a prize for a girl like Pris. Sebastian, Aspen, and Pris are all going places in their lives...and he knows he can't keep tagging along for the ride.The group has one last chance for The Epic Adventure they've been looking for: a road trip to New York, where Jaden's friends will be going to college. Unfortunately, the more time Jaden hangs around Pris, the harder it is to keep the carefully constructed walls between them so she doesn't find out what a train wreck he really is. When the trip ends, Jaden has to decide if he's ready to say goodbye to his friends, and the girl he loves. He knows what he needs, but will he be man enough to go for it?A companion novel to What a Boy Wants.

Headline

Make Good Art

Neil Gaiman
Authors:
Neil Gaiman

From the bestselling author of the acclaimed novel AMERICAN GODS and the prize-winning THE OCEAN AT THE END OF THE LANE.In May 2012, Neil Gaiman delivered the commencement address at Philadelphia's University of the Arts, in which he shared his thoughts about creativity, bravery, and strength. He encouraged the fledgling painters, musicians, writers, and dreamers to break rules and think outside the box. Most of all, he urged them to make good art.The book MAKE GOOD ART, designed by renowned graphic artist Chip Kidd, contains the full text of Gaiman's inspiring speech.Praise for Neil Gaiman:'A very fine and imaginative writer' The Sunday Times'Exhilarating and terrifying' Independent'Urbane and sophisticated' Time Out'A jaw-droppingly good, scary epic positively drenched in metaphors and symbols... As Gaiman is to literature, so Antoni Gaudi was to architecture' Midweek'Neil Gaiman is a very good writer indeed' Daily Telegraph

Headline

This Is What Happy Looks Like

Jennifer E. Smith
Authors:
Jennifer E. Smith
Headline

The Storm Makers

Jennifer E. Smith
Authors:
Jennifer E. Smith
Headline

The Other Daughter

Lisa Gardner
Authors:
Lisa Gardner

THE OTHER DAUGHTER is a brilliant standalone thriller from The Sunday Times and New York Times bestseller Lisa Gardner. IF YOU CAN'T TRUST YOUR FAMILY, THEN WHO CAN YOU TRUST? Sophie Hannah and Karin Slaughter love Lisa Gardner. Have you read her yet?When Melanie wakes up in hospital all she knows is that she can't remember any of the first nine years of her life and no-one is there waiting for her.For Dr Stokes - who treated Melanie that night - and his wife, their decision to adopt the abandoned child comes as a blessing following their desperate struggle to deal with the brutal murder of their four-year-old daughter, Meagan. But when, after twenty years of happy family life, Melanie suddenly finds her past under investigation by a reporter and an FBI agent, everything she thought she knew about her new life is questioned. And when horrific messages and gifts start arriving, Melanie is forced to face the terrifying reality that her family may be the last people she should trust...

Headline

The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight

Jennifer E. Smith
Authors:
Jennifer E. Smith
Posted by Headline authors

Beat those January blues...

Emma Hannigan, author of THE SUMMMER GUEST and THE HEART OF WINTER : I would like to take this opportunity to wish all readers a very happy and healthy new year. As a nine times cancer survivor I am incredibly grateful to have the opportunity to embrace the next twelve months. I am so excited about my new book The Secrets We Share and I sincerely hope you will all enjoy it. May 2015 bring sunshine to your hearts and sparkles to your souls. Love and light, Emma Stephen Lloyd Jones, author of THE STRING DIARIES and WRITTEN IN THE BLOOD : Key challenges this year are to stop swearing so much and learn to play by ear Chopin's ‘Nocturne’ in E Flat Major (Op. 9, No. 2). Pretty tough, those two, especially in combination. Jill Mansell, author of THE UNPREDICTABLE CONSEQUENCES OF LOVE and THREE AMAZING THINGS ABOUT YOU: Jill Mansell's New Year's Resolution. (To become a hare...) I spend my life envying other people for all sorts of reasons: that they are tall and thin... that they genuinely love exercise and aren't afraid to do it... that they have elegance and style and can travel long distances without getting all flustered and panicky... But nothing - NOTHING - inspires more envy than when I hear fellow writers say casually on social media, 'There, have just written five thousand words in two hours. Now off to have lunch with friends, followed by an afternoon of shopping - time for some fun!' Because they are hares and I am the tortoise. While they're out, gaily raising their Champagne glasses to each other and celebrating another sparkling chapter of their novel effortlessly done and dusted, I'm left at home like Cinderella, plodding my way through the next five hundred words, which will take me all day to write. So this is my resolution for 2015: I am going to stop procrastinating and endlessly distracting myself and whingeing to other people on Twitter that my writing is going so slowly. Instead I'm going to sit down and concentrate, and just get on and do it until it's done. Jo Thomas, author of THE OYSTER CATCHER : To be honest, I find it very hard to give anything up. If someone tells me I can't have it, I want it more! So I plan to do more of certain things. Eat more fruit. Walk more, because it's such good thinking time when I’m writing. The characters just start chatting amongst themselves and it's a great way to set myself up for a day’s work. And reading, of course. I love reading and I seem to end up squeezing in a bit of reading time at the end of the day before falling asleep. So I'm giving myself permission in 2015 to read more and enjoy! Paul Fraser Collard, author of THE DEVIL'S ASSASSIN and JACK LARK: ROGUE : 1) Learn how to use a semicolon properly. Word tells me that I need to consider revising the ones I do use and who am I to ignore such wise advice. 2) Accept that I have more than a few rogue grey hairs. Just For Men is no longer a viable option. 3) On at least one occasion prove to my sixteen-year-old son that I do really know better than he does. 4) Stop trying to convince my family that Opal Fruits (yes, Opal Fruits, not Starburst) count as one of my five-a-day. 5) Stop checking my Amazon sales ranking. No more. Never again. Or at least, not more than once or twice a day. Sarah Hilary, author of SOMEONE ELSE'S SKIN and NO OTHER DARKNESS : Every January, I arm myself with fresh Moleskine notebooks and pens, and with books and DVDs to stimulate my curiosity. As I get to work on book three, this year's arsenal includes Explore Everything by Bradley L. Garrett, Paranoia by Freeman and Freeman, and box-sets of True Detective, and The Mentalist. My chief resolutions (the same every year): to bury the past, and to live (and write) in the moment. Sierra Kincade, author of THE MASSEUSE and THE DISTRACTION : I resolve to live the kind of life that inspires me to write more books. Wait... I write naughty books. I mean, live a more adventurous life (in the bedroom). Wait. I mean, just get out of the house more. (Now that sounds even naughtier!) Sigh. I resolve to write more books. I resolve to eat more cake and feel less guilty. I also resolve to cry tears of pain at the gym following said cake. And I resolve to invest in a chocolate IV which will keep me blissfully caffeinated. And if that doesn't work, I resolve to just stay blissfully caffeinated. 2015 is going to be a great year. Barbara Nadel, author of BODY COUNT and LAND OF THE BLIND : In 2015 I've said I will say goodbye to some of my self-doubt – can't say goodbye to all of it or I won't be neurotic any more. But I will be asking for more. I want to have more fun with friends or chocolate or, preferably both. I'm only giving up celery. Professionally, I want to do a lot more publicity and public-speaking work and I want to write ever more challenging books. Apart from that, just world peace, more money for the NHS, and more public tolerance of eccentricity. If a woman wants to lie in her own bath in a wedding dress, that really is her business. And we should respect that. Nicola Doherty, author of IF I COULD TURN BACK TIME and the GIRLS ON TOUR series: Hello. My name is Nicola and I’m a New Year’s Resolution addict. I’ve made the same resolutions for probably the past five years. They tend to include running more, eating less sugar, lifting weights, doing more yoga, watching less TV and … flossing. This last one became so popular among my friends a few years ago that we joked about substituting flossing for drinks as a social engagement. (I also gave up alcohol for January once, but not any more: if there’s one month where you NEED a drink, it’s January). This year, I’m doing a slight variation on the usual. Inspired by this website, I looked at why my previous resolutions failed, and built in contingency plans. I’ve signed up for a half marathon on 22 March, so that I HAVE to run. I realised that the reason I never kept up my weights before is that it’s so boring. So I’ve started having a little flash disco at home every afternoon for ten minutes, just dancing with my weights aloft like Jane Fonda. Obviously I look nuts but I’m dancing on my own so it’s fine. And – most importantly – I’m marking every successful day in my calendar. Seven days in, it’s working – just seeing that tick on the calendar is enough to make me do it. It’s a pity I didn’t think of this five years ago, but there you go. People who love making resolutions don’t understand people who don’t. In my next book Girls on Tour, Maggie and Rachel get together for a ‘friendship date’ after first meeting on a skiing holiday. The date is very awkward and stilted initially – until the girls realise that they share a love of New Year’s resolutions and bond over their relentless drive for self-improvement. Maggie and Rachel both end up breaking most of their resolutions – except two: they’ve both resolved to make new friends and to travel more. And they do! Another thing I’ve learned: positive and fun resolutions are always easier to keep … Of course New Year’s Resolutions don’t always work. Otherwise we’d all be thin, fit, decluttered and fluent in Mandarin. But they still hold out a glittering promise – that one day we’ll overcome our limitations and become better, healthier, more productive versions of ourselves. I’m optimistic by nature, so I’ll continue to make my resolutions. And even if they just end up giving me a slightly healthier January, what’s wrong with that? Steven Dunne, author of THE UNQUIET GRAVE and A KILLING MOON : At my age the only important New Year's Resolution is to get healthier and stay that way. Less booze, less food and more exercise, the latter especially problematic for a writer. Career-wise it's simple. With A Killing Moon in 2015 I want to reach new readers and, in so doing, open up my previous novels for discovery to thriller lovers everywhere. Happy and healthy New Year to everyone.

Posted by Ben Willis, Publicity

Blog: Headline Goes To Edinburgh

The Headline Edinburgh Team had no less than FOUR objectives when we planned our trip to the Edinburgh International Book Festival this year: support our awesome authors during their packed-out events; hijack anyone and everyone even marginally famous; glug Irn Bru from a litre glass bottle down a poorly lit side street (pictured); and blast out awesome/ful renditions of One Direction songs at full volume in an overcrowded karaoke booth with people you've only very recently met. And it is with great pride that I can whole-heartedly confirm that we achieved ALL of our goals.

by Emylia Hall

From a mother to her son

Dear son The first line of one of my favourite books goes like this… If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you'll probably want to know is where I was born, and what my lousy childhood was like, and how my parents were occupied and all before they had me, and all that David Copperfield kind of crap, but I don't feel like going into it. Well, Calvin Jack Etherington, this is your mother speaking, and I do feel like going into it… I've a few years yet before you can tell me I'm embarrassing you.

Jennifer E Smith on Halloween

YA author Jennifer E Smith shares her memories of Halloween

Headliners discuss their favourite literary teen romances

HEADLINE TALKS YOUNG LOVE

This Thursday 28th August marks the paperback publication of CONQUEST, the first in an epic new Young Adult Sci-Fi trilogy by bestselling author John Connolly, and Jennifer Ridyard. Set on Earth but not as we know it, Conquest tells the story of a world occupied by the Illyri, a fierce and beautiful alien race, and features two teens embroiled in the ultimate forbidden love.

Posted by Leah Woodburn, Editorial

Blog: Our First Blog Post!

Welcome! We’re very excited that we now have somewhere to air our news and views on all things publishing and beyond. Think of it as a work in progress for now: it will, before we know it, be a slick and well-oiled machine. Until then, be kind…

TOUCH AND GO

The Sunday Times top ten bestseller Lisa Gardner's latest thriller, TOUCH AND GO, is out now in paperback. Here's an exclusive look at chapter one to whet your appetite...

THE HEIST

Our ebook of the month is THE HEIST, the first adventure in an electrifying new series from Janet Evanovich and Lee Goldberg.

Posted by Emily Barr, Author

Blog: Writing and Travelling by Emily Barr

One of the perks of writing books set in far-flung locations is the fact that I have to visit these places before I can write about them. Nobody ever accepts that these trips are ‘work’, and they are right. They are, in many ways, its opposite. Looking for places for a cast of imaginary people to have adventures is a bizarre pursuit. It involves finding out what it’s like to be somewhere: absorbing the sights, the sounds, the smells, buildings and food of a place. As it happens, this often involves spending time on a beach. All in a day’s work. It was travel that got me writing fiction. Fifteen years ago, I left a job at the Guardian and went away backpacking, more or less on the spur of the moment. It was one of the best years of my life. I had huge highs and terrible lows, but the moment I hit south east Asia I became obsessed with the idea of using it as a setting for a novel. I remember beginning to write a book, sitting on the beach at Palolem in Goa. I dug my toes into the hot sand and decided that I wanted an obnoxious main character, someone who would say exactly what she thought. If she was unbearable at the start of the book, then the experience of being out in the world on her own, forced to spend time alone, to talk to strangers, to fit into other ways of doing things, would change her. By the end of the novel I wanted her to be quite different. And her adventures would, of course, follow the same backpacking trail as my own. Those notes grew into Backpack, and eleven more novels have followed. Three of them, written when I was living in France and had small children, did not involve a trip away, but were set partly in France instead. For every other one I have packed a bag and set off, usually with a friend in tow, to find a place for my characters’ adventures. When I wrote The Perfect Lie, I caught an overnight train from Paris to Venice with my friend Sam and checked into the canalside hotel in which Don’t Look Now had been filmed (we only discovered that after booking: it was a fabulous extra detail, particularly since the place had clearly not been updated since the film was made in 1973). We spent six days wandering around Venice, jumping on and off boats, sitting at outdoor tables in bars sipping prosecco, and photographing and noting every detail. I would write every day, sitting on the hotel bed and staring out at the entrance to the Grand Canal that was outside the window. It was ‘work’, but it was also, of course, the opposite of work. It was time away from everyday life. It was the chance to plan a few days around lunch and dinner in interesting corners of the city, and to spend the time in between looking at frescoes in churches, standing on boats staring at implausibly picture-perfect views, and imagining interesting scenarios. Planning adventures for made-up people can be almost meditative: nothing is a better escape from real-life traumas. I go on these trips to scour the locations, but they also invariably kick-start my writing. The most obviously blissful research trip I’ve ever been on was the trip to Malaysia for Stranded. As the story largely takes place on a desert island, I needed to find a paradise beach in Asia and to spend time lying around on it – not something I was ever going to be able call ‘work’ with a straight face. My friend Vanessa and I hit upon Pulau Perhentian Kecil in Malaysia, booked up some accommodation, and set off. It took us a while to get there on various buses, taxis and boats, and there were plenty of mishaps along the way, but eventually we were stepping off a boat and into the clear shallow water of a sheltered bay. The sand was white, the tropical flowers huge and bright, and there was nothing to be seen but a few wooden huts, one of which was to be our home for the next few nights. ‘This,’ I thought, ‘will probably do.’ Then I tripped over one of the boat’s ropes and fell headfirst into the warm sea, which, while undignified, was not the worst thing that has ever happened. The days that followed were an amazing blast of writing in hammocks, reading on beaches, swimming in the sea and exploring the rainforest that forms the whole of the interior of the island. I came away with a book in my head, almost fully formed, and a notebook filled with ideas. In contrast to the paradise beach, this year I went to Svalbard, deep into the Arctic Circle, on my own. I had not been away alone since my very first travelling, my trip around the world. This trip, in late May, was difficult to sell to potential companions: ‘Come to the far North of the world! It will be freezing and snowy and incredibly remote’ is not, it turns out, as enticing a proposition as the one about the desert island beach. So I boarded a flight on my own, to Oslo, then Tromsø, then Longyearbyen, in Svalbard, an archipelago halfway between the north Norwegian coast and the North Pole. Norway is, of course, incredibly easy to navigate and extremely safe for a solo woman. Nonetheless, being alone again was very weird. Everything was so expensive that I existed on snacks. I didn’t speak to anyone. I stayed in the cheapest guesthouse in town, sharing a bathroom with a corridor full of hearty men in their twenties who all had explorers’ sledges piled up outside their doors with equipment for hearty expeditions. They said friendly hellos to me, but I was, essentially, on my own for five days. No conversation, no hot food, no alcohol: it was like a Buddhist retreat, but with midnight sun and snow. It was, again, one of the best times of my life. I kept waking up, all night long, to check that the sun was still shining outside my window (it was). I went on a day-long boat trip that was breathtaking and otherworldly, and that culminated with the sight of a mother polar bear leading her two cubs across the ice. I wandered into the world’s northernmost church just as a woman was using a fork-lift truck to remove boxes with ‘Arctic Philharmonic Orchestra’ stencilled onto them. Everywhere I looked I saw something stunning. I plotted out a whole story, incorporating everything around me. I have done the research: all that remains is the small matter of writing the book. Emily Barr's latest novel, the sensational The Sleeper, is out now in paperback.

CHAPTER SAMPLER

ebook of the month

An exclusive extract featuring New York Times bestseller John Lescroart's most popular character, lawyer Dismas Hardy, in his most personal case so far.