Related to: 'Brian Turner'

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The Crystal Maze Challenge

Neale Simpson
Authors:
Neale Simpson

The Crystal Maze is back and there's no place like dome. Packed full of over 100 new games, mind benders and riddles, with this book you can now play the ultimate game show in the playground of your own home. Join ranks with family and friends as you travel through the four iconic zones - Aztec, Industrial, Future and Medieval - guided by Maze Master Richard Ayoade. Some games are quick, so you can have a spontaneous game if you fancy, whilst others require a bit more preparation but they can all be played with household items!Test your skill, mental and physical abilities as you try to leap around your living room without touching the floor, solve puzzles and brainteasers, and complete treasure hunts around the house, all the while trying to win the crystals before heading to The Crystal Dome ... and remembering not to leave anyone locked in any cupboards! The Crystal Maze is ready and waiting ... will you start the fans please!

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Egg and Soldiers

Miles Jupp
Authors:
Miles Jupp

'A gloriously enjoyable read from start to finish' - Daily Express'Here's a book to savour' - Mail on SundayMiles Jupp (News Quiz presenter, star of Rev, I'm Sorry I Haven't a Clue and The Thick Of It) delves into the mind of his comedy creation Damien Trench - urbane food writer and protagonist of BBC Radio 4's acclaimed sitcom In and Out of the Kitchen. 'Are you Damien Trench?' said the lady operating the stall.'I might be,' I said to the lady.'You are though, aren't you?' she asked.'Well...yes,' I agreed. And that was that.She seized me by both hands, pulled me towards her, and launched into a passionate monologue that covered a selection of dessert recipes that I had once offered up in print, her difficult relationship with soft cheeses and her husband's irritable skin. So intense was her manner that it was extremely difficult to tell if she was scolding or praising me. All I knew was that she was staring so intently at me that I became worried that parts of me would dry up and just drop off like smoked chipotles. Also, her eyes were so extremely wide open that I began to worry that it might be dangerous to let so much light into your head. As soon as she stopped speaking, I thanked her for being willing to share, broke free from her grasp, panic-bought three punnets of raspberries on the way out and then sprinted back to the Uno as fast as fast can be.'Whether you're already a fan of Jupp's bumbling bon viveur, or are stumbling across him for the first time, here's a book to savour.' Mail on Sunday

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The Pool House: Someone lied. Someone died.

Tasmina Perry
Authors:
Tasmina Perry

'This relentlessly brilliant novel will keep you enthralled from start to end *****' Heat'A dark and devious psychological thriller with all the glamour you'd expect' Red'With dark twists I did not see coming - the perfect end-of-summer read' Daily MailThe heartpounding new novel from Sunday Times bestselling author Tasmina Perry will keep you on the edge of your seat. A must-read for everyone who's been gripped by the THE GIRLFRIEND by Michelle Frances, J. P. Delaney's THE GIRL BEFORE. or who loved TV's THE AFFAIR. A Summer To Die ForTo Jem Chapman, it's the chance of a lifetime. An invitation to join a group in an exclusive Hamptons house-share, who could say no? But when she discovers what happened last summer, Jem can't help but feel a chill.A young woman was found drowned in the house's pool. The housemates said Alice was troubled. She'd been drinking. She couldn't swim...A Secret To Kill ForAs Jem gets to know her glamorous new housemates, she realises each has something to hide. What really happened last summer? And who would go to any lengths to keep a person quiet?What readers are saying about The Pool House...'Pacy and full of believable (but tough-to-guess) twists' Cosmopolitan 'This rollercoaster read will keep you guessing right to the very end' Closer'Well-drawn characters and a twisty plot make this page-turner a must-read' Good Housekeeping'With a smart plot and characters you'll both love and love to hate' Red'With dark twists I did not see coming - the perfect end-of-summer read' Daily Mail'Dark and twisty suspense-packed drama' Woman & Home'A brilliant page-turner' Prima

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My Kind of Food

John Torode
Authors:
John Torode

My Kind of Food is a very personal book from John Torode, full of the food that he loves to cook and eat, recipes that he makes away from the cameras and professional kitchens. In John's words:'My world as I know it started with my Nanna's roasting tin, a chicken and a wooden spoon. The food she cooked was always simple, but delicious. Her cauliflower cheese was awesome, her caramel slice wonderful and I am still searching for a recipe to make her apple tea cake. So life started simply for me. Since then I have cooked in professional kitchens, run my own restaurants and done a lot of telly. Some of you may have eaten in my restaurants, some may have seen me on MasterChef, but I guess that not many of you know what I really cook for myself and my friends and family. This book is about how I cook at home and the chapters reflect me and the things in life I love - how I eat and how I cook. At its heart, it is simple, but it's definitely also influenced by my years in restaurant kitchens. I don't tend to define my food by type or style. I guess you could say that these are my real favourites - a behind-the-scenes look at my own kitchen!' BRUNCH TO LUNCH The Aussie in me is all about eating through the morning. My perfect day starts slowly - if breakfast is the meal of kings, then brunch is the food of emperors. FOR THE FAMILY Although I am a professional cook, I have a number of dishes that I rely on at home. They are all tried-and-tested, some are posh, some are simple, but all are favourites. IN A RUSH I cook every day, but sometimes it needs to be quick and easy. But there's no reason why a quick meal should not be tasty. STORES AND LEFTOVERS Great food is created from necessity. Open your cupboards and look for the potential in your fridge. For many a minefield, but for me a gold mine. These are the recipes I know well from being a boy and watching in wonder what could be made with a bit of this and a bit of that. Not complicated just delicious.ALL OUTSIDE Well, I am an Aussie. Some of the best food in the world is cooked outside, where having fun is as important as cooking. AND TO FINISH I love a good dessert. A proper steaming pudding with thick custard or real ice cream. It's all about being a kid and not caring about sugar and spice. Cakes and tarts and pies and lots of them.

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Prashad At Home

Kaushy Patel
Authors:
Kaushy Patel

Since winning everyone over on Ramsay's Best Restaurant, Prashad has grown in size and reputation, and so too has the Patel family. In this, their second book, Kaushy returns the focus to the heart of Indian home cooking. Traditional recipes have been simplified using readily available ingredients. These are the quick dishes that can be prepared in the evenings when you're tired after work, meals to leave bubbling away while you relax at the weekend and feasts for special occasions - as well as everything you need to serve alongside: the breads, the rice and the chutneys. You'll also find many recipes drawing influence from British, Chinese and Italian cuisines - a perfect combining of cultures in the kitchen. And, because Gujaratis are well known for their sweet teeth, there are plenty of snacks and treats too. Life is all about balance after all. Times have changed and what we eat should suit our lifestyle, but whether you have 20 minutes or two hours, cooking should be enjoyed, bringing both you and those you are cooking for pleasure.From bhajis to feast biryanis to beans on toast, Gujarati-style, here are more than 100 recipes to bring warmth, taste and texture into your home, all made with the Patel's characteristic love and passion for vegetarian food.

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Five Quarters

Rachel Roddy
Authors:
Rachel Roddy

Rachel Roddy's Five Quarters won the Guild of Food Writers' First Book award and the André Simon Food Book award 2015.'Five Quarters stands out as particularly considered and evocative...Impeccably researched and transportive, it's a proper read, rather than a quick flick.' AA Gill, Sunday Times best cookbooks 2015'Of course I thought Rome was glorious, but I didn't want to stay. A month, three at most, then I'd take a train back to Sicily to finish the clockwise journey I'd interrupted, before moving even further southwards...'Instead, captivated by the exhilarating life of Testaccio, the wedge-shaped quarter of Rome that centres round the old slaughterhouse and the bustling food market, Rachel decided to rent a flat and live there. Thus began an Italian adventure that's turned into a brand new life. Five Quarters charts a year in Rachel's small kitchen, shopping, cooking, eating and writing, capturing a uniquely domestic picture of life in this vibrant, charismatic city. Combining Rachel's love of Italian food and cooking with a strong nostalgia for home and memories of growing up in England, this is a cookbook to read in bed as well as to use in the kitchen.Chapters:AntipastiSoup & PastaMeat & FishVegetablesDolci

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Hotel Chocolat: A New Way of Cooking with Chocolate

Chocolate is one of our most popular ingredients - both to eat and to cook with. But how many of us know how truly versatile it is? Hotel Chocolat, the UK's leading chocolatier, has pioneered 'cocoa cuisine': a new way of cooking with chocolate because, athough we know chocolate as a sweet ingredient, cocoa was originally used in savoury recipes. In fact, cocoa is a 'super-ingredient' with many layers of flavour and plenty of goodness too, and and this book showcases its many flavours and nuances with over 100 innovative chocolate recipes, both sweet and savoury.Hotel Chocolat has created energy-boosting recipes for breakfast, savoury recipes that enhance meat and fish dishes as well as give texture and depth to salads and snacks. And of course, not forgetting the hedonistic qualities that we love so much - with seductive bakes and puddings for all tastes.Find out too how to use the whole bean, from the shell to the nibs, cocoa powder to bar. And how to roast your own beans and even create a bar of your own. Uniquely, each recipe has a Cocoa Factor to indicate the depth of flavour as well as the cocoa percentage and region that will best suit the dish. Angus Thirlwell, Hotel Chocolat's visionary founder, will also take you through the story of chocolate from pod to plate.Welcome to cocoa cuisine!

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Tasty

Tony Singh
Authors:
Tony Singh
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One

Florence Knight
Authors:
Florence Knight

Cooking's new golden girl. GuardianThe new kitchen goddess. Daily MailEach chapter in One focuses on recipes built around one particular store cupboard ingredient, such as ketchup, oil, salt and honey. The result is a host of modern European dishes that have appeal, longevity and a touch of elegance to boot. OliveShe made her name as head chef at London's Polpetto and now Florence Knight has brought out her first book, One. In it, she turns to the kitchen cupboard to create no-nonsense but creative food from her favourite ingredients - proving just how much can be achieved with a bottle of ketchup and some imagination. Waitrose KitchenFlorence is the next big thing in cooking. Observer Food Monthly'Less is more' typifies Florence's style. She cooks with delicacy and almost poetic simplicity but with a meticulous attention to detail that manifests itself in dishes of rare and delightful flavours. Russell Norman, Polpo

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Prashad Cookbook

Kaushy Patel
Authors:
Kaushy Patel

100 delicious vegetarian Indian recipes from Gordon Ramsay's Best Restaurant runner-up Prashad. The Patels and Prashad, their small Indian restaurant in Bradford, were the surprise stars of Ramsay's Best Restaurant TV show in autumn 2010. Everyone who saw them fell in love with this inspirational family dedicated to serving delicious, original vegetarian food.At the heart of the family is Kaushy, who learned to cook as a child growing up on her grandmother's farm in northern India. On moving to northern England in the 1960s, she brought her passion for fabulous flavours with her and has been perfecting and creating dishes ever since. Never happier than when feeding people, Kaushy took her son Bobby at his word when he suggested that she should share her cooking with the world - a launderette was converted first in to a deli and then a restaurant, and Prashad was born.Now Kaushy shares her cooking secrets - you'll find more than 100 recipes, from simple snacks to sumptuous family dinners, to help you recreate the authentic Prashad experience at home. Whether it's cinnamon-spice chickpea curry, green banana satay, spicy sweetcorn or chaat - the king of street-side India - there's plenty here for everyone to savour and share.

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Gennaro's Italian Home Cooking

Gennaro Contaldo
Authors:
Gennaro Contaldo

When an Italian cooks dinner, it's always a meal to savour and enjoy with as many people as can be found to share it with. In GENNARO'S HOME COOKING, Gennaro shares his favourite family recipes - the ones that will feed a crowd of hungry guests, from his 90-year-old father to his three-year-old twin girls. Older generations give advice, all hands are on deck to help, and the whole family sit themselves down at the large dining table to join in the feast together. The table is like the altar - to eat, drink, discuss, argue and confess - but most of all to enjoy the wonderful food! All the recipes cater for large numbers of people, but have tips on how to adapt them for smaller groups, there are hints on how to prepare things in advance and advice on which dishes go with what, so it is full of creative menu ideas. With GENNARO'S HOME COOKING you have everything you need to make your own kitchen a little slice of Italy.

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Eating In

Sue Lawrence
Authors:
Sue Lawrence
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Great British Grub

Brian Turner
Authors:
Brian Turner

160 classic recipes in this ultimate best of British collectionA Yorkshireman born and bred, celebrity chef Brian Turner has always been a champion of British food. From his legendary Yorkshire pudding and traditional roasts to classics both contemporary and nostalgic, GREAT BRITISH GRUB is a collection of sumptuous dishes to conjure up memories of childhood and home. This is Brian's definitive take on British mealtimes. You will find recipes for the perfect Sunday lunch as well as for breakfast and brunch, picnics and barbecues and high teas and supper, including inspirational ideas for all those special occasions and holidays throughout the year, everything from Mother's Day to bonfire night and Shrove Tuesday. A feast of hearty fare served up with a generous helping of Brian's trademark charm and humour.

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Gennaro's Italian Year

Gennaro Contaldo
Authors:
Gennaro Contaldo

A favourite of many national TV shows from Richard and Judy, Saturday Kitchen, BBC Breakfast and Jimmy's Farm, to all of Jamie Oliver's series, Gennaro Contaldo is an irrepressible and enthusiastic font of Italian culinary knowledge and he is back with his second book.A celebration of Italian lifestyle and culture as much as Italian food, GENNARO'S ITALIAN YEAR includes recipes for every month of the year, from summer favourites to Christmas essentials. With stories from his childhood to give a flavour of life in Italy and more than 120 delicious recipes, this is the definitive Italian cookbook from the country's favourite Italian chef.

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Gennaro's Italian Home Cooking

Gennaro Contaldo
Authors:
Gennaro Contaldo
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Going Places (The Hopkins Family Saga, Book 5)

Billy Hopkins
Authors:
Billy Hopkins

It's 1950, and when Laura and Billy Hopkins return to Manchester from their honeymoon, they're in seventh heaven despite the austerity that has been going on since World War II. But the euphoria gradually evaporates and they settle into a penny-pinching existence on Billy's teaching salary, as babies and bills appear with alarming regularity. When Billy spots an advertisement for Education Officers in Kenya, it sounds like the answer to all their prayers, despite worries about the Mau Mau rebellion and the omnipresence of dangerous creatures. After much family debate, Laura, Billy and the junior Hopkins set off to Nairobi on a BOAC Argonaut and start on the biggest adventure of their lives...

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Seven Dials (Thomas Pitt Mystery, Book 23)

Anne Perry
Authors:
Anne Perry

Thomas Pitt is summoned to the offices of Victor Narraway, head of the Imperial Secret Service. An ex-army officer and promising young diplomat has been shot and the prime suspect is the Egyptian mistress of a senior cabinet minister. But some things don't add up at the scene of the murder. When the Egyptian Ambassador puts in a call to Prime Minister Gladstone, it seems a major diplomatic row is brewing. Thomas is convinced Narraway knows more than he claims, and Pitt's wife Charlotte fears there could be involvement with the secret organisation that destroyed Pitt's Metropolitan Police career and nearly cost him his life. Can Pitt tread the tense diplomatic tightrope between protecting justice, the security of his country, and the safety of his family?

THE HEIST

Our ebook of the month is THE HEIST, the first adventure in an electrifying new series from Janet Evanovich and Lee Goldberg.

By Clemency Burton-Hill

New York, New York

Being a freelance writer has its upsides and its down; but an indisputable up is the ability to choose one’s office daily. As I write, I am sitting in a small café on Hudson and Charles, spotted on a whim as I crossed over the street from Seventh Avenue. It boasts walls of exposed old brick and studiedly shabby wooden furniture; a vinyl record of jazz turns on a gramophone in the corner. October sunlight slants lazily across the street and slinks in through the café windows, gilding a wall of analogue photographs depicting the proprietor’s great-grandparents in curling sepia. It is late 2012; the New York headquarters of some of the twenty-first-century’s most cutting-edge technology companies are in the vicinity; but with this chipped mug of coffee in my hands here and that Charlie Parker LP spinning there, I could be occupying the sort of contemplative corner spot that any number of human characters in New York may have occupied before me. Other years, other faces, other times. People sometimes complain that Greenwich Village, like much in Manhattan, has “altered beyond recognition” and I’m sure in many ways it has – it is in the very nature of this town; the very name of this town, to enshrine the possibility of change. But I also know, I feel intuitively, that there is still in these streets the unwavering spirit of the old city, catering generously and eternally to the needs of those whose hearts are open, curious and yearning. There’s no place like this on earth. In other words, New York’s still got it. **** When I turned eighteen, I was given a subscription to the New Yorker for my birthday. A decade later, almost to the day, I moved to Manhattan and for the first few months I lived here, the simplest and most wondrous of the inestimable gifts this city bestows seemed to be this: that I could open those storied pages, flip to Goings On About Town, and, if I so desired, “go on about town”. I could read about a jazz gig, a book reading, a film opening, a symphony or rock concert, an opera, a play, a new restaurant and, bank balance permitting, experience it that same night. Back in my hometown of London – itself a city not without wonder – reading the Goings On section of the New Yorker became a weekly act of masochism, yielding predictable twists of almost palpable longing. To read about what was happening that same night across the Atlantic; to dream, to imagine, but to only be able to imagine – to not be in New York was sometimes too much to bear. Yet this is a city that has always been created by the imagination; a metropolis lovingly constructed in ink and paper and celluloid and dreams as much as it is by bricks and mortar, steel and glass. To borrow an insight from that master observer of New York, E. B. White, there are roughly three New Yorks: that of the natives, that of the commuters, and that of the settlers. That notion was true when White wrote “Here is New York” in 1948, and it strikes me as being resoundingly true today. Like him, I believe that the third New York will always be the most important, the most vital, because it is the one whose foundations are laid first in the minds of human beings born and living elsewhere – those for whom New York City is the ultimate destination. When the settler-dreamers hit the bedrock, having crossed bodies of water, been coughed up through tubes or tunnels or deposited by planes, it is up to them – to us – to turn those dreams into something resembling reality. And because New York has a unique capacity to absorb whatever is thrown at it and whomever arrives on its shores, they invariably do play their own unique part in shaping what happens next in the mighty pageant that is life here. Although, not always: New York also spits out more dejected and disappointed souls than any other city on earth. We transplanted “New Yorkers” must also live with the lurking shadow of that possibility every day. **** The music fades, the needle lifts, and a bearded barista with complicated tattoos on his forearms whom I’d wager lives in Brooklyn goes to flip the record to its B-Side. Which reminds me of a startling fact: the first jazz disc ever to be cut in the world was cut in New York. Ever in the world! It was Nick La Rocca’s Original Dixieland Jazz Band with “Livery Stable Blues”, in early 1917. But I plucked that particular “first” from the sky; really it’s not so startling – New York is a city of firsts. A city of human beings calmly doing things that will forever alter the direction of how those things can be done. From sculptors to subway contractors; from traders of sundries to traders of derivatives; from writers of music to writers of insurance to writers of code. Right now, I wonder, how many blocks am I from wonder? A short stroll in any direction and I might run into a movie crew shooting on a corner of Bleecker whose young director, as yet unknown, will win an Oscar next year; I might walk past an innocuous office building on Houston in which employees at a start-up whose name we’ve never heard of are busy inventing the next game-changing technology that we will soon all take for granted; I may glance at construction workers on a downtown skyscraper site whose silhouette will one day be a byword, a metaphor, a symbol for something the whole world understands – or maybe will just be a building so beautiful it makes people weep. This guy sitting next to me, meanwhile, tapping away on his laptop; for all I know he could be writing the world’s next Booker-winning novel. This is New York. Since arriving at this café, moreover, I have seen through these sunlit windows every sort of human face pass along Hudson Street. Even here, in this achingly well-heeled neighborhood where a brownstone townhouse around the corner on Perry is apparently on the market at fifteen million dollars (“What the hell – I’ll take two!”) I have seen faces old and young; faces black and brown and pink and white and many shades of grey. Faces beautiful and completely unmemorable; faces brimful of life; faces seemingly close to death. Perhaps these faces come from Puerto Rico, from Sierra Leone, from Mexico, England, Haiti, Cuba, Latvia, Kenya, Russia, Ireland or Italy. Perhaps from China, Tunisia, Wales, India, Jamaica, New Zealand, Greece or Poland. Perhaps they were born in a gleaming hospital uptown, or in a railroad apartment in an outer borough; perhaps they were born half way around the world. But here in New York they are. And as White memorably observed: “the collision and the intermingling of these millions of foreign-born people representing so many races and creeds make New York a permanent exhibit of the phenomenon of one world.” The phenomenon of one world. We know all this, of course. New York as a racial melting pot, a magnet for all comers, a global crucible of creativity: all of this has been said in myriad ways, by multitudes and over many years. But just as New York has every type of potential racial problem and for the most part enjoys a continuing and frankly miraculous city-wide tolerance, an “inviolate truce” between peoples, what astounds me is how the things we know about the city – the clichés and stereotypes, the myths and legends – go on being true, and indeed, get truer. Why? How? How do you work, New York? How are you even plausible? **** When you tell people you live in New York, I have found, reactions generally divide into those whose eyes widen with envy and those who wrinkle their brows in horror – or, worse, pity. “Oh no,” they shake their head, “I could never live there – so noisy, so dirty, so smelly. And why does everyone have to be so unbelievably rude?” There are also those who grumble that New York has somehow lost its character; been homogenised and commercialised and overrun by identical shops, adverts and tourists who genuinely appear to think queuing outside Abercrombie & Fitch a valid use of time. Well, yes. Surely Broadway has its grim bits; clearly one does well to avoid Times Square. Obviously you ignore the horse-and-cart guys in Central Park and of course you don’t eat at Olive Garden or wait forty-five minutes for a Magnolia Bakery cupcake. And of course New York is smelly and dirty and busy and crowded. If White thought in 1948 that “the normal frustrations of modern life are here multiplied and amplified” he would possibly be dismayed (but not surprised) to discover that more than half a century on there is still “not enough air and not enough light, and there is usually either too much heat or too little”. But in general, I believe, New York still has more life and curiosity and character in a single city block than even – dare I say it – London. And I’m a born and bred London girl who once suspected that if you were to cut my veins I would bleed the Thames. (I have also lived in Paris, and - hit me over the head with a baguette – I’m afraid that glorious capital does not compare either.) For more than three years, for example, my local Subway stop has been Grand Central. Rushing across the Main Concourse before I head underground to catch a train, I try always to look up at the ceiling and promise myself I will never, ever take such a sight for granted. When back in London, equally, I remind myself not to sigh in inevitable disappointment when I board the Piccadilly Line to go home. It’s a grossly unfair comparison, of course: how could poor old Hammersmith, my local Tube, ever hope to win against those majestic cathedral glories on 42nd Street? But that’s the point, isn’t it? **** In January 2012, the population of the entire New York City metropolitan area hit nineteen million people. It can be lonely here; sometimes unutterably so: a teeming place of human isolation and even desperation. By Grand Central Station I have indeed sat down and wept. But as White also captured brilliantly: “Although New York often imparts a feeling of great forlornness or forsakenness… you always feel that either by shifting your location ten blocks or by reducing your fortune by five dollars you can experience rejuvenation.” Reducing one’s fortune by five dollars here, by the way, remains the easiest damn thing in the world. Another cup of coffee at this very café, especially if accompanied by one of those artisanal sea-salt cookies they bake downstairs, will barely leave me change from twice that. In a doorway down the street, some wit has stuck a poster referencing the iconic slogan: I CAN’T AFFORD TO  NY. It has probably never been more difficult or more expensive to live in New York. Yet I and so many others would not be anywhere else in the world. Shifting my location, I will take my five bucks and get another coffee at some other place, ten blocks away, twenty, or who knows where. It doesn’t matter where I go: I open the door and the universe awaits. CLEMENCY BURTON-HIL, NEW YORK CITY, OCTOBER 2012

TOUCH AND GO

The Sunday Times top ten bestseller Lisa Gardner's latest thriller, TOUCH AND GO, is out now in paperback. Here's an exclusive look at chapter one to whet your appetite...