Related to: 'Jenny Blackhurst'

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Aftershock

Adam Hamdy
Authors:
Adam Hamdy

FEAR IS THE DEADLIEST WEAPON.Adam Hamdy's first PENDULUM novel was called 'one of the best thrillers of the year' by James Patterson and chosen as a BBC Radio 2 Book Club pick. AFTERSHOCK is the page-turning climax to an explosive series that has gripped fans of Lee Child and Simon Kernick. 'One of the best thriller writers I've read in recent years, Adam's writing is slick and unputdownable' Jenny Blackhurst,#1 eBook bestselling author THEY BELIEVED IT WAS OVERHaving survived the lethal Pendulum conspiracy, photographer John Wallace atones for his past mistakes.DI Patrick Bailey clings to the hope that he can, at last, return to a normal life in London. BUT IT'S ONLY JUST BEGINNINGFBI investigator Christine Ash - alone and paranoid - hunts down the remaining members of the ruthless Foundation organisation.DARK FORCES ARE RISING AGAINBut when masked assassins strike at the heart of the UK government, a shocking new threat emerges that forces all three to reunite.DEADLIER THAN EVER BEFOREWith time running out, they must defeat a lethal new adversary: a manipulative mastermind with sinister powers unlike anything they've seen before. 'Watch out, Jack Reacher and Alex Cross, the new generation is here!' - Crime TimeWhy readers are raving about AFTERSHOCK:'Cleverly plotted, excellent characters and a truly terrifying reality made Aftershock a truly gripping read.' *****Goodreads reviewer'Aftershock was hugely satisfying and an absolute pleasure. Could not have asked for more.Highly recommended.' *****Goodreads reviewer'A hard hitting action thriller in which the reader can never be sure who will survive or who will be turned...a recommended read' *****Goodreads reviewer Praise for the PENDULUM series:'I read Pendulum in one gloriously suspenseful weekend. Definitely one of the best thrillers of the year' James Patterson'So tense, you will be biting your nails long before the final chapter.' The Sun'A relentless, adrenaline-charged thriller that grips from the first page' Daily Express'One of the best thriller writers I've read in recent years, Adam's writing is slick and unputdownable, he hooks you in from the first chapter and doesn't let you come up for air.' Jenny Blackhurst,#1 eBook bestselling author

Wildfire

And So It Begins

Rachel Abbott
Authors:
Rachel Abbott
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After Anna

Lisa Scottoline
Authors:
Lisa Scottoline

Internationally bestselling author Lisa Scottoline returns with this gripping, twisting thriller that will keep fans of Jenny Blackhurst's THE FOSTER CHILD and Shari Lapena's THE COUPLE NEXT DOOR guessing until the very end.Everyone deserves a second chance at happiness.Dr Noah Alderman, a widower and single father, is finally content after marrying the wonderful Maggie. And they're both thrilled when Maggie gets an unexpected chance to be a mother to Anna, the daughter she once thought she'd lost forever. But when seventeen-year-old Anna arrives everything changes - and the darkest turn of events will shatter their lives in ways no one could have imagined.What if your perfect family becomes your worst nightmare?

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The Night She Died

Jenny Blackhurst
Authors:
Jenny Blackhurst

The addictive new psychological thriller from Jenny Blackhurst, the #1 eBook-bestselling author of HOW I LOST YOU. Full of dark drama and unexpected twists, this will suit fans of FRIEND REQUEST, CLOSE TO HOME, and THE GUILTY WIFE.'Hooked from the first page and kept me guessing right up until the end.' Claire Douglas, Sunday Times Top 10 bestselling author of The Sisters, Local Girl Missing and Last Seen AliveOn her own wedding night, beautiful and complicated Evie White leaps off a cliff to her death. What drove her to commit this terrible act? It's left to her best friend and her husband to unravel the sinister mystery. Following a twisted trail of clues leading to Evie's darkest secrets, they begin to realize they never knew the real Evie at all...Readers LOVE The Night She Died...'The Night She Died is a gripping and hugely enjoyable book. As their lies weave a trap for the characters, the twists come at a pace that will make your head spin. I was hooked from the start' Jane Casey'Utterly fabulous. Hooked all the way through, from one chapter to the next.' Rebecca Bradley'Blackhurst's excellent writing keeps the tension high right through to the final page' Rachel Abbott'The Night She Died is expertly plotted, utterly captivating and wonderfully dark - I loved it!" Susi Holiday'A fiendishly twisting mystery I finished almost in one sitting. Jenny Blackhurst is the new queen of the psychological thriller.' Mason Cross'The Night She Died is a rollercoaster ride you'll love' Lucy Dawson'This talented writer knows a thing or two about her craft.' Amanda Jennings'This book has been read under desks in lecture theatres, on the school run, on trains... #obsessed!' C.R. Myers'Utterly gripping, this devious thriller will have you racing to the end with its intrigue and clever pacing' Woman's Weekly

Wildfire

PIG

Helen Browning, Tim Finney
Authors:
Helen Browning, Tim Finney

'Anyone who has any interest in what we eat, how we produce it or how we should manage the landscape for our children should read this book' Monty DonWhat is it about the humble pig that holds such a special place in our hearts?In a frosty field on the longest night of the year, eight little piglets snuffle their first breaths, and jostle close to their mother to feed...Over the six months that follow, lifelong farmer Helen Browning and her partner Tim Finney record their adventures to show how pigs become the mischievous, competitive, intelligent and inventive animals that we know them to be. In doing so, they demonstrate why it is so crucial that the welfare of our farm animals - and equally, the way we manage our countryside - takes centre stage in the contemporary discussions around food, climate change and the loss of wildlife. Lyrically told and drawing on a lifetime's worth of knowledge, this is a timely and entrancing exploration of our relationship with farm animals, with nature, and with life itself.If you liked The Secret Life of Cows and A Shepherd's Life, you'll love this evocative and illuminating tale

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The Girl I Used To Be

Mary Torjussen
Authors:
Mary Torjussen

'A teasing, suspenseful, and twisty read!' Shari Lapena, THE COUPLE NEXT DOORCompletely gripping and full of page-turning twists, this dark psychological thriller is perfect for fans of Laura Marshall's FRIEND REQUEST and K.L. Slater's LIAR. YOU DON'T REMEMBER. HE WON'T LET YOU FORGET.Gemma Brogan needs a break from her life.A work event looks the ideal chance to get away. And a friendly new client seems like the perfect gentleman when he joins Gemma for an innocent dinner . . .But the next morning she has no memory of how the night ended and he has vanished into thin air.Suddenly, Gemma is plunged into a twisted nightmare she can't control. To protect her future, and her family, she will have to confront shocking secrets from her past - and the truth about the girl she used to be.'This page-turner will have you gripped from the start.' Take A Break magazineWHAT READERS ARE SAYING:'What a fantastically twisty psychological thriller!' Goodreads Reviewer, 5 stars'The Girl I Used To Be is a brilliant read, addicting, fast-paced, and unputdownable' Goodreads Reviewer, 5 stars'Mary Torjussen has put together the perfect balance between chilling and thrilling' Goodreads Reviewer, 5 starsPRAISE FOR MARY TORJUSSEN:'A page turner with a cracking ending' Jenny Blackhurst, THE FOSTER CHILD'This fast-paced story kept me guessing - great twist at the end' K.L. Slater, LIAR and BLINK'A twist that will knock your socks off' Gillian McAllister, ANYTHING YOU DO SAY

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Freefall

Adam Hamdy
Authors:
Adam Hamdy

ONE RULE. TRUST NO-ONE.This explosive, pulse-racing thriller is perfect for fans of JACK REACHER and ORPHAN X, with a story as unexpected as a sniper's bullet. Adam Hamdy's first PENDULUM novel was called 'one of the best thrillers of the year' by JAMES PATTERSON.JOHN WALLACE IS A TARGETHiding off-grid after exposing the shadowy Pendulum conspiracy, Wallace is horrified to discover he is still marked for death.THERE ARE ONLY TWO PEOPLE HE CAN TRUSTDI Patrick Bailey is still reeling from the murder investigation that nearly cost him his life. FBI Agent Christine Ash is hunting a serial killer with a link to an unfinished caseHE MUST FIND THE TRUTHThe death of a London journalist triggers an investigation that brings them back together, hurling them into the path of an unknown enemy.BEFORE THE KILLER FINDS HIMHunted across the world, they are plunged into a nightmare deadlier than they could have ever imagined.'One of the best thriller writers I've read in recent years, Adam's writing is slick and unputdownable, he hooks you in from the first chapter and doesn't let you come up for air.' JENNY BLACKHURST, the #1 eBook (P)2017 Headline Publishing Group Ltd.

Headline

Gone Without A Trace

Mary Torjussen
Authors:
Mary Torjussen
Headline

Before I Let You In

Jenny Blackhurst
Authors:
Jenny Blackhurst
Headline Review

The Life I Left Behind

Colette McBeth
Authors:
Colette McBeth
Headline

How I Lost You

Jenny Blackhurst
Authors:
Jenny Blackhurst
CHAPTER SAMPLER

eBook of Month

Evil will follow you… Wherever you go. Can you find a way to hide? If you like Karen Rose, Katia Lief or Mary Burton you’ll love Debra Webb’s bestselling Faces of Evil series. Click below to read the first chapter of the third instalment, POWER, published for the first time in the UK this month.

POWER by Debra Webb

eBook of the month

Evil will follow you… Wherever you go. Can you find a way to hide? If you like Karen Rose, Katia Lief or Mary Burton you’ll love Debra Webb’s bestselling Faces of Evil series. Click below to read the first chapter of the third instalment, POWER, published for the first time in the UK this month.

Where Were You?

Blog: Andy Murray, Wimbledon 2013

‘Where were you when...?’ is a game of immense value. Questions such as, Where were you when Elvis died, when the twin towers fell or when Princess Diana died? are ones to keep in your back pocket for necessary small-talk-scenarios, when the conversation is dwindling at dinner parties or when you're two-thirds through your long haul flight. But this game does much more than simply enliven the chatter accompanying the proffering of After Eights. It makes the momentous microscopic, it takes grandiose events experienced by everyone and translates them to a more personal level – and this summer, on 8th July 2013 on Centre Court at Wimbledon, Andy Murray did not just become the first male to win Wimbledon since Fred Perry in 1936; he unwittingly added fresh new material to this game. Now, ‘Where were you when Andy Murray won Wimbledon?’ will forever be immortalised as a legitimate question to add to the list, to which all proud Brits will have a good, patriotic story to share. To prove this, I presented the question to the office - read their varied and wonderful tales below... Read on to the end – David McTeague’s is my favourite! Abigail Mitchell - Sales - I was at a really nice pub in Stratford (very close to where Andy won his gold medal at the Olympics!) with my best friend (also Scottish). We sat outside in the sunshine watching the big screen while enjoying the outdoor BBQ. We both shed a little tear when Andy won! Jenny Karat - Regional Manager I was on holiday with my husband and children in Provence, along with two other families. It was a baking hot day; we had many bottles of chilled rose, a pool to cool off in and we switched the huge television on for the only time during the week we were there. Watching Andy Murray win in those surroundings with our friends was a Wimbledon I will never forget! Emily Griffin - Editorial I spent the match crouched on my living-room floor (not the sofa, it was too tense for the sofa) conveying my support/frustration/excitement/despair to the TV. If the match had gone to a fourth set, there’s absolutely no way I (never mind Murray) would have had the stamina to cope. Top sporting drama! Darcy Nicholson - Editorial Before I was taken there as a translator, I had never heard of Gabon in Africa. And yet, when Murray won Wimbledon there I was, sitting in the lobby of a hotel in the country’s capital, freezing cold in the path of a manic air-conditioning unit. We watched the match on a French channel, revelling in the eccentric commentary but despising the ad breaks in live TV – the BBC wouldn’t have dared! By the time Murray won, we had the entire hotel behind him; we cheered, we cried and we celebrated with local beer. Highly recommended. Lynsey Sutherland - Marketing I was watching the final in the park, with a makeshift iPad/pizza box set-up (see below). Our iPad ran out of battery in the last game so we rushed home but just missed the last 5 minutes!!! Noooo! Christina Demosthenous - Editorial I was at a screen in Kings Cross next to Central St Martin’s college. It was absolutely packed and the atmosphere was buzzing. We were drinking Pimms in the sunshine and cooling off in the water fountains in the breaks. It was so summery and British! Beau Merchant - Marketing I was on a nudist beach in Croatia (romantic). The bar overlooking the beach had wi-fi so I was following it on the BBC website / Twitter. Our boat to the mainland left at a certain time which meant I missed the final set! We bumped into a group of Scots that night out celebrating so it wasn't all bad news. Frances Edwards - Editorial I was at a music festival up in the Yorkshire Dales and part of a throng of people completely ignoring the band, desperately refreshing live BBC coverage every two minutes and getting stressed at the lack of phone signal. Someone must have managed it in the end as a mass cheer went up when he won and an electro-ceilidh struck up on stage! And the semi-famous David McTeague - Commercial... I was standing on a hill surrounded by other tennis fanatics, knackered after camping all night in Wimbledon, slightly inebriated after drinking wine all morning in the queue, and to be honest, crying shortly after this picture was grabbed off the TV. Such an amazing moment.

CHAPTER SAMPLER

ebook of the month

An exclusive extract featuring New York Times bestseller John Lescroart's most popular character, lawyer Dismas Hardy, in his most personal case so far.

October Book of the Month

A steamy excerpt from The Chalet

A steamy excerpt from The Chalet, an e-novella in Tara Sue Me’s tantalising Submissive series. The Chalet is out on 21st October 2014.

Suzanne Brockmann talks about her bestselling series, and reveals the book closest to her heart…

Meet the Troubleshooters

When wrote your first Troubleshooters book, THE UNSUNG HERO, could you imagine that it would be come such hugely successful and popular series? And did you envisage it would run for so many books? I hoped it would succeed! It was my intention, right from the start, to do something that was unusual - at the time - for contemporary romance novels. I wanted to weave subplots into my books that did not deliver the tried-and-true happily-ever-after that readers expected. I think that by guaranteeing a HEA ending, we sometimes cheat our readers out of experiencing a fuller range of emotions.

TOUCH AND GO

The Sunday Times top ten bestseller Lisa Gardner's latest thriller, TOUCH AND GO, is out now in paperback. Here's an exclusive look at chapter one to whet your appetite...

Posted by Leah Woodburn, Editorial

Blog: Our First Blog Post!

Welcome! We’re very excited that we now have somewhere to air our news and views on all things publishing and beyond. Think of it as a work in progress for now: it will, before we know it, be a slick and well-oiled machine. Until then, be kind…

Adele Parks, Author: Getting to grips with the blogosphere

Blog: Adele Parks Shares Her Inspiration For Novel SPARE BRIDES

I’m not really one for blogging. I wish I was. I see that blogging is a very good way to reach out and let people know what’s on your mind, what you care about and what worries you. These are all very valid reasons to blog, but I use my fiction for all of that. By the time I’ve finished writing my novels I’m usually pretty spent. I write a book a year and have done for fourteen years and, after a day writing my novel, writing a blog seems a bit like a busman’s holiday. I’ll admit it – I’d rather watch something on Netflix. So what then, you might wonder, has drawn me out now to write my first blog piece? Spare Brides, that’s what – my new novel, out February 13th. I think the terms that will be used to describe it will include, ‘my foray into historical fiction’ or ‘my change of direction’, but Spare Brides is not that alone, not to me. It’s not a ‘foray’ (which sounds experimental and unsure, a little whimsical; I’m very certain that this is the novel I have always wanted to write) and it’s not a change of direction per se. OK, so I’ve set my novel in 1921 which is not what I usually do. The clothes are different, the homes, the social, academic and financial circumstances of the women are different from those I usually write but, importantly, the crux of the women remains the same. The women in Spare Brides are scared, truthful, brilliant, flawed, sexy, hopeful, hopeless, lost and found. They are like us. I didn’t know this was going to be the case when I started to write Spare Brides. If I thought of the women of the 1920s at all I pictured them as either lumpy, glum, and silent, or absolute jazzing flappers, wildly irresponsible, definitely young. After researching and coming to know the women of that period, I quickly gathered that neither stereotype was just or complete. So Spare Brides is about a beautiful, damaged generation irreparably changed by the Great War. I’ll be completely honest – I never had much interest in World War One. I thought it was remote, masculine, unfathomable. When I was thirteen I went on a school trip and visited some of the graves of the men that died in battle; there were literally hundreds of thousands of them. I was struck by the uniformity but, at the time, I didn’t think of that as interestingly equalitarian (which I do now understand and value). I thought it was overwhelming, and the men the graves honoured remained inaccessible. It was only four years ago that I started to think about the stories behind the grave stones and, even then, not the men exactly. As a writer who has always been most interested in women’s psychology, women’s stories and experiences, I started to think about the wives, lovers, mothers and daughters connected to the men in the graves. The women the men left behind. Three quarters of a million British men died in World War One, the same number again were horribly injured, losing their sight and limbs, while countless more suffered enormous, unimaginable mental traumas. I came to wonder what happened after the war when they came home – how did they cope with their injuries? How did their loved ones cope with men so damaged? How was it for the millions of women whose men didn’t come home? The grief must have been like a tsunami wave, drenching everyone; no one could escape. Over a period of four and a half years everyone in the country knew some who had died. One in three lost a husband, son or father. The pain had to have been horrendous. Relentless. Somehow, however, that damaged generation picked themselves up, brushed themselves off and carried on. Of course they did, because humanity is magnificent. The more I thought about it, the more I wanted to research the lives of these women of the 1920s. I became obsessed, reading contemporary novels and accounts of the war and the aftermath and then reading recently written social commentaries. I wanted to know how those women earned a living, what they wore and talked about, what they wanted out of life, how they stayed warm, especially at night. The stories I uncovered were fascinating. Of course I found heartbreaking tales of emotional and financial poverty as a result of the loss of a loved one and examples of widespread loneliness and regret, but I also found stories of women who saw that the new decade was offering chances and freedoms never before dreamed of, and they grabbed them. It was an exhilarating time. The more I researched the women of this generation the more I admired them and felt for them. They became the foundation of modern women and we have a lot to thank them for. I had to write their stories. I’ve always written about ordinary people doing extraordinary things so it didn’t seem such a leap. I just placed my characters in different circumstances – the aftermath of a war. Spare Brides is about four friends (because I love writing about friendship which should be an elixir of promise but, on sad and rare occasions, seems like a slow poison). The four women are upper middle class but, in a time of social flux, at least two of them are struggling financially – Sarah because she lost her husband in the war, Beatrice because she lost her chances to marry, and financial security always came from husbands back then. They struggle with their newly straightened circumstances with dignity and buried frustration, the way many women have just got through the recession; holding a family together and holding your head up high has never been easy. Sarah is a single mum now, daunted but coping, again a situation that so many of us can relate to in 2014. Beatrice doesn’t ask ‘Where have all the good men gone?’ the way my single friends do from time to time now. She knows; they were blown to bits in the trenches. Ava understands that the best men dying out in France is a tragedy, but she also sees opportunity. Now she won’t have to be married off and can have a career, although in-roads into any career were hard won for a woman. Ava has to struggle with deep-seated prejudice against women in the business place and against women who are sexually confident, financially independent and emotionally secure. Sound familiar? That sort of attitude still threatens now. I loved writing Ava; she’s spirited and intoxicating. Women like her forged the way for us. Lydia is my heroine although, like many of my heroines, she has to come with a health warning: she is not instantly likeable, she is certainly not wise or self-aware. Her husband managed to secure a desk job during the war and so has survived intact; instead of seeing her luck she can only see his cowardliness and she can’t forgive him for not standing up with his generation. Enter Edgar, a damaged, angry soldier. He’s gorgeous, but unknown. Trouble. I don’t want you to think Spare Brides is all about grief and sadness; it was an incredibly glamorous time and a time of sexual and romantic experimentation. Spare Brides has, at its heart, a profound love affair. It’s about passion, longing and jealousy because it turns out none of that stuff is modern. Who knew? This novel feels a lot like writing my debut. I’ll admit I’m excited and terrified. I’ve laughed in the face of the trusted idiom, ‘If it ain’t broke, why fix it?’ by changing genre. It’s taken me just under four years to research and write Spare Brides. To try to do it justice. I might have just gone on forever thinking about those women that were referred to as ‘surplus’ in the press of their time but the 100th anniversary of World War One is upon us and I thought that was a good opportunity to publish their stories. This book is very close to my heart, because I’m trying to tell the stories of not only the four women I’ve invented, but of a generation of women who endured the unimaginable with such beautiful dignity. Hundreds of thousands of them never married as a direct consequence of the war. They didn’t have children or grandchildren so their stories were not passed on verbally, finding life in the head and hearts of their offspring, the way women’s stories so often are. Their disappointments and suffering, their dreams and achievements were silenced. Forgotten. I’m just trying, in my own way, to give those women a voice. I’d be proud if you found you had the time to listen. There ends my first honest blog.