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Miguel Barclay's FAST & FRESH One Pound Meals

Miguel Barclay
Authors:
Miguel Barclay

The must-have second book by the bestselling One Pound Chef, Miguel Barclay. Over 80 delicious super-simple recipes that will save you both time and money. Cook delicious food for less. One Pound Meals became an instant bestseller and the biggest debut cookbook in 2017 with incredible 5-star reviews from his fans and readers. Now in Miguel Barclay's second book, the original One Pound Chef focuses on fresh and light food, all for £1 per person. Here are warm, delicious salads, light soups, nutritious stir-fries and lots of vegetarian meals. All follow Miguel's One Pound style of cooking - simple ingredients, straightforward recipes and mouthwatering meals - and now ready in minutes. With over 80 recipes that are easy to shop for - especially when short of time - Miguel will help you get the most out of your ingredients with his tasty and fast dishes. He will teach you how to shop savvy, buying fresh seasonal ingredients but also show you clever shortcuts with frozen versions when you are in a hurry. Perfect for summer, great for your pocket.'The feedback you gave me from One Pound Meals was that you guys loved the speed and simplicity of my recipes, so I turned this up a notch for you and have created over 80 super-fast recipes for this book. I've also devised more of my characteristic One Pound Meals shortcuts to get you cooking fun and exciting dishes every day of the week without spending hours in the kitchen. I was inspired by all the amazing food from around the globe, especially the street food in Thailand and the refreshing noodle and rice dishes from China. And then, from Europe, I've gone once again to the Mediterranean, taking inspiration from their simple rustic fish dishes that I love so much. These guys adore their food and live in glorious sunshine, so they know how to balance flavours to create light and uplifting summer dishes.My aim is to motivate you to cook as many recipes as possible by making them as irresistible as I can. I want you to keep cooking, discovering one recipe after another, using up ingredients as you go along.'Fast & Fresh recipes include: * Summer Chicken Pie* 5-Spice Baked Feta & Asparagus Salad* Goan Cauliflower Curry* Green Shakshuka * Smoky Fish Tacos* Baked Eggs & Asparagus* Falafel Burger* Butternut Gnocchi with Crispy Parma Ham & Feta* Goats' Cheese 'Scallops'* Mexican Tortilla Soup* Fisherman's Pie

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One Pound Meals

Miguel Barclay
Authors:
Miguel Barclay
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The Hen Night Prophecies: Hard To Get

Jessica Fox
Authors:
Jessica Fox

Fate, hope and charity influence Charlotte's romantic destiny as the third prophecy in the addictive HEN NIGHT PROPHECIES series is revealed: 'Love will come through hope alone.'Communications officer Charlotte loves her job at the Arts Council - it's just a shame she has to share the office with her ex-husband, who also happens to be dating her boss. If there's one thing that Charlotte doesn't possess in her current romantic predicament, it's hope. So when she finds herself in the beautiful Yorkshire moors visiting the Council's current funded projects, including the aptly-named Hope Foundation, she can't resist a wry smile. But it's not long before Charlotte has three potential suitors to choose from: her repentant ex Richard, devoted single-parent Paul, and the notoriously dashing but ever-so-moody Heath. Perhaps Charlotte has reason to hope after all...

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The Luxe Life

Fleur De Force
Authors:
Fleur De Force

Every girl deserves a little bit of luxe in her life and top beauty and fashion vlogger Fleur de Force - Sunday Times bestselling author of The Glam Guide - knows exactly how to get it."Luxe living is all about becoming your best self - the one you've always wanted to be - and making it look effortless. It's about making every day feel special and knowing that a little bit of extra effort in any aspect of your life goes a long way. This is my lifestyle bible for girls who want to make The Luxe Life a reality, regardless of budget or time constraints."Packed with:- Inspiring fashion and beauty advice- Budget-friendly hosting hacks- Lifestyle tips to make your home a sanctuary- Creative and thoughtful DIY gift ideas- Over 30 must-have recipes to take you from brunch to dinner partyThe Luxe Life is the essential guide to wowing at every special occasion, and making every day special.

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Prashad At Home

Kaushy Patel
Authors:
Kaushy Patel

Since winning everyone over on Ramsay's Best Restaurant, Prashad has grown in size and reputation, and so too has the Patel family. In this, their second book, Kaushy returns the focus to the heart of Indian home cooking. Traditional recipes have been simplified using readily available ingredients. These are the quick dishes that can be prepared in the evenings when you're tired after work, meals to leave bubbling away while you relax at the weekend and feasts for special occasions - as well as everything you need to serve alongside: the breads, the rice and the chutneys. You'll also find many recipes drawing influence from British, Chinese and Italian cuisines - a perfect combining of cultures in the kitchen. And, because Gujaratis are well known for their sweet teeth, there are plenty of snacks and treats too. Life is all about balance after all. Times have changed and what we eat should suit our lifestyle, but whether you have 20 minutes or two hours, cooking should be enjoyed, bringing both you and those you are cooking for pleasure.From bhajis to feast biryanis to beans on toast, Gujarati-style, here are more than 100 recipes to bring warmth, taste and texture into your home, all made with the Patel's characteristic love and passion for vegetarian food.

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Honey & Co: The Baking Book

Itamar Srulovich, Sarit Packer
Authors:
Itamar Srulovich, Sarit Packer
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Caribbean Modern

Shivi Ramoutar
Authors:
Shivi Ramoutar

When you think of the Caribbean, a hundred beautiful clichés come to mind - white sand, blue sky, salty breezes and balmy nights. But what of the food? Eating is at the heart of Caribbean life: people come together in the kitchen, someone starts cooking and soon there is laughter, music and fantastic food.Shivi Ramoutar grew up in Trinidad, Leicester and London. As a supperclub host and pop-up chef, Shivi turned to her favourite Caribbean dishes for inspiration. Her recipes are a wonderful melting pot of flavours: traditional Coconut Chicken Rundown sits alongside Red Bean and Spinach Mac 'n' Cheese and Baked Eggs Creole. Her food is fresh and zingy, exciting and exotic, but also satisfyingly homely and hearty. And not forgetting the fun -Salted Tamarind Caramel Sundae, Smashed Banana Pancakes and Peanut Butter and Jelly Cheesecake - without which the book just wouldn't be Caribbean.

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The Urban Rajah's Curry Memoirs

Ivor Peters
Authors:
Ivor Peters

Please note this has been optimised for display on tablets and colour devices.Bursting with delicious recipes and stunning illustrations, this is a food memoir like no other.Curry has become an integral part of our staple diet but few of us are aware of what 'authentic' means when it comes to Britain's favourite food - how it is cooked and what makes it so sublime. Instead we have been patronised with dumbed-down versions of wonderfully spiced dishes through the provision of gooey mixtures that slime their way out of jars. 'No more!' cries self-proclaimed Urban Rajah Ivor Peters. The search for homemade, straightforward fragrant food ends here. Packed full of inspiring stories and generations-old recipes, this book opens the door into a world of family cooking that will teach us how to cook delicious curry in our own homes. So put down that jar of low-fat chicken tikka masala, rip up your takeaway menu and let Ivor lead you through a journey of spice that will leave you revelling in colour, yearning for the delicate smells of cardamom and cinnamon and desperate to tear a chapatti to shreds and plunge it into a curry feast of your own making.

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Prashad Cookbook

Kaushy Patel
Authors:
Kaushy Patel

100 delicious vegetarian Indian recipes from Gordon Ramsay's Best Restaurant runner-up Prashad.The Patels and Prashad, their small Indian restaurant in Bradford, were the surprise stars of Ramsay's Best Restaurant TV show in autumn 2010. Everyone who saw them fell in love with this inspirational family dedicated to serving delicious, original vegetarian food.At the heart of the family is Kaushy, who learned to cook as a child growing up on her grandmother's farm in northern India. On moving to northern England in the 1960s, she brought her passion for fabulous flavours with her and has been perfecting and creating dishes ever since. Never happier than when feeding people, Kaushy took her son Bobby at his word when he suggested that she should share her cooking with the world - a launderette was converted first in to a deli and then a restaurant, and Prashad was born.Now Kaushy shares her cooking secrets - you'll find more than 100 recipes, from simple snacks to sumptuous family dinners, to help you recreate the authentic Prashad experience at home. Whether it's cinnamon-spice chickpea curry, green banana satay, spicy sweetcorn or chaat - the king of street-side India - there's plenty here for everyone to savour and share.

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Loose

Martin Thomas
Authors:
Martin Thomas

Google breaks the traditional rules of branding by changing its logo everyday. Doritos handed over the US premium advertising slot in the Superbowl to a couple of amateur filmmakers. The software industry is well used to 'living a life in beta.' Even Pope Benedict XVI has embraced the inclusive, 'Obama model' of communication with YouTube broadcasts in 27 languages in an attempt to encourage debate. If the Pope can do loose, anyone can.Loose thinking is at odds with all but the most progressive organizations. Businesses pay lip service to customer collaboration while still exerting maximum control. As Clay Shirky suggests, companies that create products, services and message that are too perfect will leave the consumer thinking 'where is the space for me?' LOOSE shakes up the status quo and shows how prevailing business wisdom needs to change.

By Clemency Burton-Hill

New York, New York

Being a freelance writer has its upsides and its down; but an indisputable up is the ability to choose one’s office daily. As I write, I am sitting in a small café on Hudson and Charles, spotted on a whim as I crossed over the street from Seventh Avenue. It boasts walls of exposed old brick and studiedly shabby wooden furniture; a vinyl record of jazz turns on a gramophone in the corner. October sunlight slants lazily across the street and slinks in through the café windows, gilding a wall of analogue photographs depicting the proprietor’s great-grandparents in curling sepia. It is late 2012; the New York headquarters of some of the twenty-first-century’s most cutting-edge technology companies are in the vicinity; but with this chipped mug of coffee in my hands here and that Charlie Parker LP spinning there, I could be occupying the sort of contemplative corner spot that any number of human characters in New York may have occupied before me. Other years, other faces, other times. People sometimes complain that Greenwich Village, like much in Manhattan, has “altered beyond recognition” and I’m sure in many ways it has – it is in the very nature of this town; the very name of this town, to enshrine the possibility of change. But I also know, I feel intuitively, that there is still in these streets the unwavering spirit of the old city, catering generously and eternally to the needs of those whose hearts are open, curious and yearning. There’s no place like this on earth. In other words, New York’s still got it. **** When I turned eighteen, I was given a subscription to the New Yorker for my birthday. A decade later, almost to the day, I moved to Manhattan and for the first few months I lived here, the simplest and most wondrous of the inestimable gifts this city bestows seemed to be this: that I could open those storied pages, flip to Goings On About Town, and, if I so desired, “go on about town”. I could read about a jazz gig, a book reading, a film opening, a symphony or rock concert, an opera, a play, a new restaurant and, bank balance permitting, experience it that same night. Back in my hometown of London – itself a city not without wonder – reading the Goings On section of the New Yorker became a weekly act of masochism, yielding predictable twists of almost palpable longing. To read about what was happening that same night across the Atlantic; to dream, to imagine, but to only be able to imagine – to not be in New York was sometimes too much to bear. Yet this is a city that has always been created by the imagination; a metropolis lovingly constructed in ink and paper and celluloid and dreams as much as it is by bricks and mortar, steel and glass. To borrow an insight from that master observer of New York, E. B. White, there are roughly three New Yorks: that of the natives, that of the commuters, and that of the settlers. That notion was true when White wrote “Here is New York” in 1948, and it strikes me as being resoundingly true today. Like him, I believe that the third New York will always be the most important, the most vital, because it is the one whose foundations are laid first in the minds of human beings born and living elsewhere – those for whom New York City is the ultimate destination. When the settler-dreamers hit the bedrock, having crossed bodies of water, been coughed up through tubes or tunnels or deposited by planes, it is up to them – to us – to turn those dreams into something resembling reality. And because New York has a unique capacity to absorb whatever is thrown at it and whomever arrives on its shores, they invariably do play their own unique part in shaping what happens next in the mighty pageant that is life here. Although, not always: New York also spits out more dejected and disappointed souls than any other city on earth. We transplanted “New Yorkers” must also live with the lurking shadow of that possibility every day. **** The music fades, the needle lifts, and a bearded barista with complicated tattoos on his forearms whom I’d wager lives in Brooklyn goes to flip the record to its B-Side. Which reminds me of a startling fact: the first jazz disc ever to be cut in the world was cut in New York. Ever in the world! It was Nick La Rocca’s Original Dixieland Jazz Band with “Livery Stable Blues”, in early 1917. But I plucked that particular “first” from the sky; really it’s not so startling – New York is a city of firsts. A city of human beings calmly doing things that will forever alter the direction of how those things can be done. From sculptors to subway contractors; from traders of sundries to traders of derivatives; from writers of music to writers of insurance to writers of code. Right now, I wonder, how many blocks am I from wonder? A short stroll in any direction and I might run into a movie crew shooting on a corner of Bleecker whose young director, as yet unknown, will win an Oscar next year; I might walk past an innocuous office building on Houston in which employees at a start-up whose name we’ve never heard of are busy inventing the next game-changing technology that we will soon all take for granted; I may glance at construction workers on a downtown skyscraper site whose silhouette will one day be a byword, a metaphor, a symbol for something the whole world understands – or maybe will just be a building so beautiful it makes people weep. This guy sitting next to me, meanwhile, tapping away on his laptop; for all I know he could be writing the world’s next Booker-winning novel. This is New York. Since arriving at this café, moreover, I have seen through these sunlit windows every sort of human face pass along Hudson Street. Even here, in this achingly well-heeled neighborhood where a brownstone townhouse around the corner on Perry is apparently on the market at fifteen million dollars (“What the hell – I’ll take two!”) I have seen faces old and young; faces black and brown and pink and white and many shades of grey. Faces beautiful and completely unmemorable; faces brimful of life; faces seemingly close to death. Perhaps these faces come from Puerto Rico, from Sierra Leone, from Mexico, England, Haiti, Cuba, Latvia, Kenya, Russia, Ireland or Italy. Perhaps from China, Tunisia, Wales, India, Jamaica, New Zealand, Greece or Poland. Perhaps they were born in a gleaming hospital uptown, or in a railroad apartment in an outer borough; perhaps they were born half way around the world. But here in New York they are. And as White memorably observed: “the collision and the intermingling of these millions of foreign-born people representing so many races and creeds make New York a permanent exhibit of the phenomenon of one world.” The phenomenon of one world. We know all this, of course. New York as a racial melting pot, a magnet for all comers, a global crucible of creativity: all of this has been said in myriad ways, by multitudes and over many years. But just as New York has every type of potential racial problem and for the most part enjoys a continuing and frankly miraculous city-wide tolerance, an “inviolate truce” between peoples, what astounds me is how the things we know about the city – the clichés and stereotypes, the myths and legends – go on being true, and indeed, get truer. Why? How? How do you work, New York? How are you even plausible? **** When you tell people you live in New York, I have found, reactions generally divide into those whose eyes widen with envy and those who wrinkle their brows in horror – or, worse, pity. “Oh no,” they shake their head, “I could never live there – so noisy, so dirty, so smelly. And why does everyone have to be so unbelievably rude?” There are also those who grumble that New York has somehow lost its character; been homogenised and commercialised and overrun by identical shops, adverts and tourists who genuinely appear to think queuing outside Abercrombie & Fitch a valid use of time. Well, yes. Surely Broadway has its grim bits; clearly one does well to avoid Times Square. Obviously you ignore the horse-and-cart guys in Central Park and of course you don’t eat at Olive Garden or wait forty-five minutes for a Magnolia Bakery cupcake. And of course New York is smelly and dirty and busy and crowded. If White thought in 1948 that “the normal frustrations of modern life are here multiplied and amplified” he would possibly be dismayed (but not surprised) to discover that more than half a century on there is still “not enough air and not enough light, and there is usually either too much heat or too little”. But in general, I believe, New York still has more life and curiosity and character in a single city block than even – dare I say it – London. And I’m a born and bred London girl who once suspected that if you were to cut my veins I would bleed the Thames. (I have also lived in Paris, and - hit me over the head with a baguette – I’m afraid that glorious capital does not compare either.) For more than three years, for example, my local Subway stop has been Grand Central. Rushing across the Main Concourse before I head underground to catch a train, I try always to look up at the ceiling and promise myself I will never, ever take such a sight for granted. When back in London, equally, I remind myself not to sigh in inevitable disappointment when I board the Piccadilly Line to go home. It’s a grossly unfair comparison, of course: how could poor old Hammersmith, my local Tube, ever hope to win against those majestic cathedral glories on 42nd Street? But that’s the point, isn’t it? **** In January 2012, the population of the entire New York City metropolitan area hit nineteen million people. It can be lonely here; sometimes unutterably so: a teeming place of human isolation and even desperation. By Grand Central Station I have indeed sat down and wept. But as White also captured brilliantly: “Although New York often imparts a feeling of great forlornness or forsakenness… you always feel that either by shifting your location ten blocks or by reducing your fortune by five dollars you can experience rejuvenation.” Reducing one’s fortune by five dollars here, by the way, remains the easiest damn thing in the world. Another cup of coffee at this very café, especially if accompanied by one of those artisanal sea-salt cookies they bake downstairs, will barely leave me change from twice that. In a doorway down the street, some wit has stuck a poster referencing the iconic slogan: I CAN’T AFFORD TO  NY. It has probably never been more difficult or more expensive to live in New York. Yet I and so many others would not be anywhere else in the world. Shifting my location, I will take my five bucks and get another coffee at some other place, ten blocks away, twenty, or who knows where. It doesn’t matter where I go: I open the door and the universe awaits. CLEMENCY BURTON-HIL, NEW YORK CITY, OCTOBER 2012

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Beat those January blues...

Emma Hannigan, author of THE SUMMMER GUEST and THE HEART OF WINTER : I would like to take this opportunity to wish all readers a very happy and healthy new year. As a nine times cancer survivor I am incredibly grateful to have the opportunity to embrace the next twelve months. I am so excited about my new book The Secrets We Share and I sincerely hope you will all enjoy it. May 2015 bring sunshine to your hearts and sparkles to your souls. Love and light, Emma Stephen Lloyd Jones, author of THE STRING DIARIES and WRITTEN IN THE BLOOD : Key challenges this year are to stop swearing so much and learn to play by ear Chopin's ‘Nocturne’ in E Flat Major (Op. 9, No. 2). Pretty tough, those two, especially in combination. Jill Mansell, author of THE UNPREDICTABLE CONSEQUENCES OF LOVE and THREE AMAZING THINGS ABOUT YOU: Jill Mansell's New Year's Resolution. (To become a hare...) I spend my life envying other people for all sorts of reasons: that they are tall and thin... that they genuinely love exercise and aren't afraid to do it... that they have elegance and style and can travel long distances without getting all flustered and panicky... But nothing - NOTHING - inspires more envy than when I hear fellow writers say casually on social media, 'There, have just written five thousand words in two hours. Now off to have lunch with friends, followed by an afternoon of shopping - time for some fun!' Because they are hares and I am the tortoise. While they're out, gaily raising their Champagne glasses to each other and celebrating another sparkling chapter of their novel effortlessly done and dusted, I'm left at home like Cinderella, plodding my way through the next five hundred words, which will take me all day to write. So this is my resolution for 2015: I am going to stop procrastinating and endlessly distracting myself and whingeing to other people on Twitter that my writing is going so slowly. Instead I'm going to sit down and concentrate, and just get on and do it until it's done. Jo Thomas, author of THE OYSTER CATCHER : To be honest, I find it very hard to give anything up. If someone tells me I can't have it, I want it more! So I plan to do more of certain things. Eat more fruit. Walk more, because it's such good thinking time when I’m writing. The characters just start chatting amongst themselves and it's a great way to set myself up for a day’s work. And reading, of course. I love reading and I seem to end up squeezing in a bit of reading time at the end of the day before falling asleep. So I'm giving myself permission in 2015 to read more and enjoy! Paul Fraser Collard, author of THE DEVIL'S ASSASSIN and JACK LARK: ROGUE : 1) Learn how to use a semicolon properly. Word tells me that I need to consider revising the ones I do use and who am I to ignore such wise advice. 2) Accept that I have more than a few rogue grey hairs. Just For Men is no longer a viable option. 3) On at least one occasion prove to my sixteen-year-old son that I do really know better than he does. 4) Stop trying to convince my family that Opal Fruits (yes, Opal Fruits, not Starburst) count as one of my five-a-day. 5) Stop checking my Amazon sales ranking. No more. Never again. Or at least, not more than once or twice a day. Sarah Hilary, author of SOMEONE ELSE'S SKIN and NO OTHER DARKNESS : Every January, I arm myself with fresh Moleskine notebooks and pens, and with books and DVDs to stimulate my curiosity. As I get to work on book three, this year's arsenal includes Explore Everything by Bradley L. Garrett, Paranoia by Freeman and Freeman, and box-sets of True Detective, and The Mentalist. My chief resolutions (the same every year): to bury the past, and to live (and write) in the moment. Sierra Kincade, author of THE MASSEUSE and THE DISTRACTION : I resolve to live the kind of life that inspires me to write more books. Wait... I write naughty books. I mean, live a more adventurous life (in the bedroom). Wait. I mean, just get out of the house more. (Now that sounds even naughtier!) Sigh. I resolve to write more books. I resolve to eat more cake and feel less guilty. I also resolve to cry tears of pain at the gym following said cake. And I resolve to invest in a chocolate IV which will keep me blissfully caffeinated. And if that doesn't work, I resolve to just stay blissfully caffeinated. 2015 is going to be a great year. Barbara Nadel, author of BODY COUNT and LAND OF THE BLIND : In 2015 I've said I will say goodbye to some of my self-doubt – can't say goodbye to all of it or I won't be neurotic any more. But I will be asking for more. I want to have more fun with friends or chocolate or, preferably both. I'm only giving up celery. Professionally, I want to do a lot more publicity and public-speaking work and I want to write ever more challenging books. Apart from that, just world peace, more money for the NHS, and more public tolerance of eccentricity. If a woman wants to lie in her own bath in a wedding dress, that really is her business. And we should respect that. Nicola Doherty, author of IF I COULD TURN BACK TIME and the GIRLS ON TOUR series: Hello. My name is Nicola and I’m a New Year’s Resolution addict. I’ve made the same resolutions for probably the past five years. They tend to include running more, eating less sugar, lifting weights, doing more yoga, watching less TV and … flossing. This last one became so popular among my friends a few years ago that we joked about substituting flossing for drinks as a social engagement. (I also gave up alcohol for January once, but not any more: if there’s one month where you NEED a drink, it’s January). This year, I’m doing a slight variation on the usual. Inspired by this website, I looked at why my previous resolutions failed, and built in contingency plans. I’ve signed up for a half marathon on 22 March, so that I HAVE to run. I realised that the reason I never kept up my weights before is that it’s so boring. So I’ve started having a little flash disco at home every afternoon for ten minutes, just dancing with my weights aloft like Jane Fonda. Obviously I look nuts but I’m dancing on my own so it’s fine. And – most importantly – I’m marking every successful day in my calendar. Seven days in, it’s working – just seeing that tick on the calendar is enough to make me do it. It’s a pity I didn’t think of this five years ago, but there you go. People who love making resolutions don’t understand people who don’t. In my next book Girls on Tour, Maggie and Rachel get together for a ‘friendship date’ after first meeting on a skiing holiday. The date is very awkward and stilted initially – until the girls realise that they share a love of New Year’s resolutions and bond over their relentless drive for self-improvement. Maggie and Rachel both end up breaking most of their resolutions – except two: they’ve both resolved to make new friends and to travel more. And they do! Another thing I’ve learned: positive and fun resolutions are always easier to keep … Of course New Year’s Resolutions don’t always work. Otherwise we’d all be thin, fit, decluttered and fluent in Mandarin. But they still hold out a glittering promise – that one day we’ll overcome our limitations and become better, healthier, more productive versions of ourselves. I’m optimistic by nature, so I’ll continue to make my resolutions. And even if they just end up giving me a slightly healthier January, what’s wrong with that? Steven Dunne, author of THE UNQUIET GRAVE and A KILLING MOON : At my age the only important New Year's Resolution is to get healthier and stay that way. Less booze, less food and more exercise, the latter especially problematic for a writer. Career-wise it's simple. With A Killing Moon in 2015 I want to reach new readers and, in so doing, open up my previous novels for discovery to thriller lovers everywhere. Happy and healthy New Year to everyone.

The Urban Rajah's Curry Memoirs - Ivor Peters

Exclusive Recipe Video

Posted by Laura Skerritt, Creative and Marketing

Blog: THE HOPE FACTORY meets THE URBAN RAJAH

Enjoy this extract from Lavanya Sankaran’s THE HOPE FACTORY, followed by two light, delicious recipes from THE URBAN RAJAH’S CURRY MEMOIRS, perfect for parties. Perhaps Anand would have chosen to serve dishes like them if his father-in-law hadn’t had his way…!

Ivor Peters shares his favourite pancake recipe

The Urban Rajah

The Urban Rajah shares his favourite pancake recipe, Honey Coconut in Lemon. Click here to see the recipe.

Posted by Leah Woodburn, Editorial

Blog: Our First Blog Post!

Welcome! We’re very excited that we now have somewhere to air our news and views on all things publishing and beyond. Think of it as a work in progress for now: it will, before we know it, be a slick and well-oiled machine. Until then, be kind…

Posted by Vicky Palmer, Marketing

Blog: The Continued Rise of the Book Trailer

You know how it works: the most engaging/cryptic/bloody/scary/poignant 30 seconds of a feature-length blockbuster Hollywood movie are carefully and painfully selected over a number of weeks, and compiled by a crack team of film buffs to make that picture seem completely unmissable. Film trailers have been drawing us in for decades, driving film-goers in their millions to the cinema to catch the latest flick on the big screen.

Posted by Helena Towers, Publicity

Blog: A Recipe for Love

It may be apparent from this blog that Headliners are quite fond of baking cakes, but what might not be apparent is that we’re even better at eating the end result. Usain Bolt would be quaking in his trainers if he saw how quickly people move when an email goes round about leftover cake in the kitchen.

Posted by Vicky Palmer, Marketing

Blog: Anyone For A Scotch Egg?

A lesson in baking with the Fabulous Baker Brothers.

CHAPTER SAMPLER

ebook of the month

An exclusive extract featuring New York Times bestseller John Lescroart's most popular character, lawyer Dismas Hardy, in his most personal case so far.