Related to: 'Adam J. Jackson'

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Gmorning, Gnight!

Lin-Manuel Miranda, Jonny Sun
Contributors:
Lin-Manuel Miranda, Jonny Sun

From the creator and star of Hamilton, with beautiful illustrations by Jonny Sun, comes a book of affirmations to inspire readers at the beginning and end of each day.Good morning. Do NOT get stuck in the comments section of life today. Make, do, create the things. Let others tussle it out. Vamos!Before he inspired the world with Hamilton and was catapulted to international fame, Lin-Manuel Miranda was inspiring his Twitter followers with words of encouragement at the beginning and end of each day. He wrote these original sayings, aphorisms, and poetry for himself as much as for others. But as Miranda's audience grew, these messages took on a life on their own. Now Miranda has gathered the best of his daily greetings into a beautiful collection illustrated by acclaimed artist (and fellow Twitter favorite) Jonny Sun. Full of comfort and motivation, Gmorning, Gnight! is a touchstone for anyone who needs a quick lift.

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Va Va Voom

Jackie Lynch
Authors:
Jackie Lynch
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Unplugged Parenting

Dr Elizabeth Kilbey
Authors:
Dr Elizabeth Kilbey

The book that every parent needs. Written by the expert child psychologist, Dr Elizabeth Kilbey, from Channel 4's The Secret Life of 4, 5 and 6 Year Olds. 'Children who get too much screen time are at risk of anxiety disorders' - BBC NewsThis is the book that every parent with a child under the age of 11 (in the latency stage of brain development) needs in order to navigate the tricky pathway of how much screen time to allow on a daily basis. Play has gone from a physical, creative experience using toys and imagination to something that now involves sitting down alone for hours at a time. Parents are dealing with children who don't listen to them, who are unable to concentrate for very long, who refuse to do homework and who constantly battle against them for more screen time. In this book, Dr Elizabeth Kilbey will offer tangible, practical advice about how to 'unplug' your child from their device so their online time doesn't become all-consuming and how we, as parents, can plug in to connect with our children.

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Six Tudor Queens: Anne Boleyn, A King's Obsession

Alison Weir
Authors:
Alison Weir
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No Other Darkness (D.I. Marnie Rome 2)

Sarah Hilary
Authors:
Sarah Hilary

Sarah Hilary, winner of the 2015 Theakston's Crime Novel of the Year for SOMEONE ELSE'S SKIN returns with the phenomenal follow-up to the critically acclaimed Richard and Judy pick. David Mark says that NO OTHER DARKNESS is 'truly mesmerising', with Eva Dolan calling it 'utterly gripping'. D.I. Marnie Rome is back with her most complex case to date.Two young boys.Trapped underground in a bunker.Unable to understand why they are there.Desperate for someone to find them.Slowly realising that no-one will...Five years later, the boys' bodies are found and the most difficult case of DI Marnie Rome's career begins. Her only focus is the boys. She has to find out who they are and what happened to them.For Marnie, there is no other darkness than this...Praise for SOMEONE ELSE'S SKIN:'A stunning debut' Mark Billingham'A slick, stylish debut. And one that certainly got under my skin' Sharon Bolton'A truly engrossing read from an exceptional new talent. Hilary writes with a beguiling immediacy that pulls you straight into her world on the first page and leaves you bereft when you finish. Intelligent, emotional and totally unexpected in terms of where it goes. I truly loved this book' Alex Marwood

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Corridors of the Night (William Monk Mystery, Book 21)

Anne Perry
Authors:
Anne Perry

When their own lives are at risk, some people will do anything to survive... Corridors of the Night is the twenty-first exceptional historical thriller featuring William and Hester Monk, from the Queen of Victorian crime Anne Perry. Perfect for fans of C. J. Sansom and Sarah Perry.'Pulls no punches and depicts Victorian London in all its corrupt glory' - Bookreporter One night, in a corridor of the Royal Naval Hospital, Greenwich, Nurse Hester Monk is approached by a terrified girl. She's from a hidden ward of children, all subject to frequent blood-letting, and her brother is dying.While William Monk's River Police fight to keep London safe from gun-runners, Hester takes on a new role at the hospital, helping to administer a secretive new treatment. But she slowly realises that this experimental cure is putting the lives of the children at risk. Attempting to protect the young victims, she comes under threat from one rich, powerful, and very ill man who is desperate to survive... What readers are saying about Corridors of the Night: 'I truly could not put this book down. The suspense had me in the edge of my seat and the subject matter had me hooked!''A riveting mystery wrapped up in the dark and seamy side of Victorian London''Anne Perry is the best Victorian crime [writer] I have ever read'

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Still The One: Animal Magnetism Book 6

Jill Shalvis
Authors:
Jill Shalvis
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Merry Christmas, Baby & Under the Mistletoe: A Lucky Harbor Omnibus

Jill Shalvis
Authors:
Jill Shalvis
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A Year in the Life of Downton Abbey (companion to series 5)

Jessica Fellowes
Authors:
Jessica Fellowes

It's 1924 and there have been many changes in the world of Downton Abbey since we were first welcomed by the family and their servants twelve years ago. A generation of men has been tragically lost at the front, there are once again children breathing new life into the great house, a chauffeur now sits at the Grantham dinner table and hems are up by several inches.Yet despite all of this unsettling upheaval, it is a comfort to find that many things at Downton remain largely unchanged. There are still parties to be thrown, summer fetes to be organised, menus to be planned and farms to be run. Join us, then, as we explore the seasonal events and celebrations of the great estate - Christmas, Easter, the debutante season, the hunt and more - and peer with us through the prism of the house as we learn more about the lives of our favourite characters, the actors who play them, and those who create the world we love so much.Packed full of exclusive new photography and brimming with traditional British recipes for each calendar month, such as Eton mess and sloe gin, this beautiful book takes us on a fascinating journey through a year in the life of Downton Abbey.

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Struck by Genius

Jason Padgett, Maureen Seaberg
Authors:
Jason Padgett, Maureen Seaberg

Jason Padgett was an ordinary, not terribly bright, 41-year-old working in his father's furniture shop when he was the victim of a brutal mugging outside a karaoke bar in 2002.That same night his stepfather died of cancer, and two weeks later his only brother went missing (his body was discovered three year later). The combined traumas of these three events proved, unsurprisingly, too much for Jason and he withdrew from life completely, living as a hermit for four years suffering with agoraphobia and the onset of OCD. During this time he developed a fascination with the principles of the physical universe, devouring mathematics and physics journals. He also started to see intricate webs of shapes in his head and discovered that he could draw these by hand.A chance encounter in a mall pointed him in the direction of college. There, his extraordinary mind was recognised, and he was set on a path in which his drawings were identified as mathematical fractals and neuroscientists were able to diagnose a unique individual.Jason is a miraculous everyman with an inspiring 'what if' story that pushes beyond the boundaries of what scientists thought possible.

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Someone Else's Skin (D.I. Marnie Rome 1): Winner of the Crime Novel of the Year

Sarah Hilary
Authors:
Sarah Hilary

Winner of the Theakston's 2015 Crime Novel of the Year, and a 2014 Richard and Judy Book Club pick.Devastating and brilliant, Sarah Hilary's SOMEONE ELSE'S SKIN has been acclaimed as 'stunning' by Mark Billingham and 'superbly disturbing' by the Observer.Some secrets keep you safe, others will destroy you...Detective Inspector Marnie Rome. Dependable; fierce; brilliant at her job; a rising star in the ranks. Everyone knows how Marnie fought to come back from the murder of her parents, but very few know what is going on below the surface. Because Marnie has secrets she won't share with anyone.But then so does everyone. Certainly those in the women's shelter Marnie and Detective Sergeant Noah Jake visit on that fateful day. The day when they arrive to interview a resident, only to find one of the women's husbands, who shouldn't have been there, lying stabbed on the floor.As Marnie and Noah investigate the crime further, events begin to spiral and the violence escalates. Everyone is keeping secrets, some for survival and some, they suspect, to disguise who they really are under their skin.Now, if Marnie is going to find the truth she will have to face her own demons head on. Because the time has come for secrets to be revealed...

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Acceptable Loss (William Monk Mystery, Book 17)

Anne Perry
Authors:
Anne Perry
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Get The Edge

Geoff Beattie
Authors:
Geoff Beattie

A fascinating guide to getting the edge in all areas of life from leading psychologist Geoff Beattie.Ever wondered how to win an argument? Or how you spend less money? Do you want to know how to stay happy? Or even how to read someone's mind? Geoff Beattie draws on cutting-edge research to answer all these questions and many more in this fascinating guide to getting what you want. With his impressive insight into what makes us tick, Geoff provides quick tips that will help you shake off your old, bad habits and quickly get into new, positive ones. Geoff's simple advice shows how you can improve your relationship with yourself and with others, sometimes in a matter of seconds.

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Dorchester Terrace (Thomas Pitt Mystery, Book 27)

Anne Perry
Authors:
Anne Perry
Business Plus

Instant Influence

Michael Pantalon
Authors:
Michael Pantalon
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Loose

Martin Thomas
Authors:
Martin Thomas

Google breaks the traditional rules of branding by changing its logo everyday. Doritos handed over the US premium advertising slot in the Superbowl to a couple of amateur filmmakers. The software industry is well used to 'living a life in beta.' Even Pope Benedict XVI has embraced the inclusive, 'Obama model' of communication with YouTube broadcasts in 27 languages in an attempt to encourage debate. If the Pope can do loose, anyone can.Loose thinking is at odds with all but the most progressive organizations. Businesses pay lip service to customer collaboration while still exerting maximum control. As Clay Shirky suggests, companies that create products, services and message that are too perfect will leave the consumer thinking 'where is the space for me?' LOOSE shakes up the status quo and shows how prevailing business wisdom needs to change.

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The Flipside

Adam J. Jackson
Authors:
Adam J. Jackson

Ebook of the Month - SHOVEL READY

Our latest Ebook of the Month is the savagely compulsive debut from New York Times Magazine culture editor Adam Sternbergh: SHOVEL READY

Posted by Lucy Mangan, Author

Blog: Hopscotch and Handbags

It was supposed to be a spoof of the then massively popular Dangerous Book for Boys, by Conn and Hal Iggulden – which was a tome full of ideas for traditional games, hobbies, skills and adventures with Swiss Army knives, compasses, matches and fish-hooks, plus gobbets of knowledge about the likes of Captain Oates and Scott of the Antarctic that boys used to have at their command and might, the authors hoped, with a little encouragement and disregard for modern health and safety legislation, be resurrected amongst contemporary male youth. The problem with writing a spoof version for girls, I soon discovered, is that you can’t. The straight version is parody enough. Boys get – without too much of a strain on memory or contemporary mores – things like making paper boats and waterbombs, (non-paper) pinhole cameras and periscopes, building tree-houses, timers and tripwires, constructing bows and arrows, hunting and cooking rabbits and tanning their skins. Not only is it entertaining to read but it will also leave you better placed than a Montana survivalist come the apocalypse. Against that, what do girls have? Pom-pom making, French knitting (remember that? Looping wool between four pins stuck in a wooden reel until a worm-type thing emerged at the other end? Why? What was it for?) and keeping their knees together when they sit down. It made me think about the relative littleness of girls’ lives then and now, here, still, properly into the third millennium and all the inconsistencies, idiocies and plain daftnesses that come with growing up female. So I wrote Hopscotch & Handbags: the Truth About Being a Girl instead, got a few things off my chest and had a laugh along the way. No, wait – I mean, it’s a very serious work of feminist history. Regard, for example, this brief but entirely factually correct summary of girls’ education: “In ye olden times, girls did not go to school. If you were lucky enough to have a lettered mother who had not died in childbirth, she might teach you to read from the Bible, if your calloused hands could still turn the pages. Then things got better and by the 1950s girls were learning home economics. This is the pedagogic equivalent of French knitting. While we girls are fucking about with baking tins, the boys are off doing secret A-levels in the Arab-Israeli conflict and US politics. This is why, when you’re 30 and trying to have an intelligent conversation with friends around the dinner table you suddenly realise that men are no longer pretending to know 400 times more about everything than you – they actually do. John Craven needs to come out of retirement ASAP and start a Newsround for women. Incidentally, I believe home ec. is now called food science and is all about nutrition. It has basically turned into an anti-anorexia class in which girls are encouraged to make Nicole Richie models out of pastry and eat them.” You see? Get you through history GCSE that will, and probably a women’s paper or two at university as well if you pad it out a bit. It’s also a vital piece of social history, recording as it does that astonishingly underexamined period the 1980s (bringing to light such little known phenomena as Judy Blume’s Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret – to this day, I still believe that if I’d just put in a little extra effort with the “I must increase my bust” mantra, my life could have turned out very differently. By which I mean, incalculably better), the knotty mass of schoolgirl hierarchies, cliques and rivalries that makes a Tudor court look like a 60s kibbutz, the evolution of beauty aesthetics, fashion, sexual mores, the demands of motherhood, and the eternal brilliance of best friends, grandmas and Dolly Parton (who, apart from her prodigious musical talent must also now be feted for the fact that her commitment to both skyscraper heels and repeated breast enhancement means that since 1973 she has been staying upright by force of will alone). And because I like to be part of the solution as well as a miner of problems for cheap laughs, I also advise on how to improve your CV, avoid crying during job evaluations (betablockers. Throw them hard at your supervisor and run), lose weight (don’t diet – exercise. It is much harder to develop a disordered relationship with the treadmill than it is with food, if only because you tend not to keep ten types of delicious treadmill at home in the fridge) and cope with your mother (just keep taking the tablets. Both of you.) Anyway. I hope you enjoy the book. It may not be better than sex or shoes, but it is less messy and it goes with everything.

Posted by Imogen Taylor, Editorial

Blog: Chestnuts Roasting Round the Christmas Fire...

Chestnuts roasting round the Christmas fire… ‘Christmas just isn’t Christmas without any presents’ says Louisa May Alcott’s Jo March, with a heartfelt but petulant tone, in one of my all-time favourite books, LITTLE WOMEN. In fact, Christmas proves to be a bit of a turning point for Jo, as she wakes to the grey dawn morning and the prospect of doing good works for the festive season. She’s sent out by her long suffering mother to tend to a poor woman with a newborn baby, and sees that others really do have a much harder time of it than she does. Lesson learnt. Anyway, this puts me in mind of the forthcoming holidays, and the children’s books that have meant most to me over the years. Another classic is ANNE OF GREEN GABLES by the Prince Edward Island raised L M Montgomery. Here’s a book I return to with huge pleasure, delighting in Anne with an ‘e’, her freckles and carrot-coloured hair and her indomitable spirit. There’s a wonderful scene in which the shy, bumbling Matthew Cuthbert realises his charge is always dressed in plain clothes, and sets out to buy her something really special for Christmas; a dress with puffed sleeves. But in the local store, he is overwhelmed by shyness and asks for first a garden rake, and then hayseed, before finally stammering out what he really wants. Anne’s tears at the sight of the soft, brown gloria dress, shining like silk that Matthew has finally managed to purchase make his agonies all the more poignant. In our house, boys abound, and while as a teenager, I used to read my little sister anything featuring the inimitable MIFFY by Dutch writer and illustrator Dick Bruna, my own brood were more action packed or magical in bent. C S Lewis wins us all round – in Narnia it’s ‘always winter, never Christmas’, and long car journeys were spent on the motorways listening to the BBC tapes of PRINCE CASPIAN or THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER. If not that, and we weren’t all sobbing over Michael Morpurgo’s THE BUTTERFLY LION, then Stephen Fry’s rendition of J K Rowling’s HARRY POTTER series proved a hit as we lived with Harry creeping through the corridors of Hogwarts in the Christmas holidays, his invisibility cloak shielding him from discovery. Those recordings are so good that I came home the other to find my sons listening to them in the kitchen. Who said being over twenty was too old for a good children’s book? Not me, that’s for sure. So, whether you’re wrapping up the age old toddler’s favourite GOODNIGHT MOON by Margaret Wise Brown, the amazing Judith Kerr’s THE TIGER WHO CAME TO TEA for a five year old, or the heart-breaking GOODNIGHT MISTER TOM by Michelle Magorian for a narrative loving primary school child, enjoy your Christmas books, read them again – and don’t forget to follow tradition and shout out Clement C Moore’s THE NIGHT BEFORE CHRISTMAS after your mince pies and sherry. As I’ve spotted a couple of furry friends scuttling behind our fridge, I really hope the following will be true in my home on Christmas Eve. ‘Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house, not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse…’ Festive Greetings one and all!