Related to: 'David Cassidy'

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The Sun & the Moon & the Rolling Stones

Rich Cohen
Authors:
Rich Cohen

Rich Cohen enters the Stones epic as a young journalist on the road with the band and quickly falls under their sway - privy to the jokes, the camaraderie, the bitchiness, the hard living. Inspired by a lifelong appreciation of the music that borders on obsession, Cohen's chronicle of the band is informed by the rigorous views of a kid who grew up on the music and for whom the Stones will always be the greatest rock 'n' roll band of all time.This is a non-fiction book that reads like a novel filled with the greatest musicians, agents and artists of the most indelible age in pop culture. It's a book only Rich, with his unique access, experience and love of the band could write.

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The End of an Earring

Pam St Clement
Authors:
Pam St Clement

In January 2012, one of EastEnders' longest-serving and best-loved characters breathed her last when Pat Butcher succumbed to cancer. Her departure from the show gave actress Pam St Clement time to reflect, not only on almost 26 years playing a role that she loved, but also on her whole life.Pam's mother died when she was a baby, leaving her with a father whose life didn't really have space for a child. What followed was an itinerant childhood, with various stepmothers and foster families, before an advertisement in The Lady took 11-year-old Pamela to the farm in Devon that was to become her true home, with the 'aunts' who became her surrogate parents. Time on the farm at Dartmoor, where she discovered her love of animals, alternated with life at The Warren boarding school in West Sussex, where she discovered her passion for acting.On leaving school, Pam was unsure of what direction to take but gradually realised that acting was what she wanted to do with her life. So, in 1966, Pam took up a place at drama school. Pam settled in London and worked on stage and television throughout the sixties and seventies, before her first appearance on EastEnders in 1986 and the offer of a permanent role a few months later.This memoir is far more than simply an actor's tale. Quite apart from her fascinating and unique childhood, Pam also recalls her involvement in the women's movement of the 1970s, her lifelong love of animals and the worries about her weight that have dogged her since her teenage years. It is also a tribute to Pat Butcher, for whom Pam retains a huge affection.This incredibly warm memoir reveals the woman behind the popular EastEnders' character, a woman who, apart perhaps from her earrings, couldn't be more different from Pat.

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Taking Command

David Richards
Authors:
David Richards
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Bruno My Story

Bruno Tonioli
Authors:
Bruno Tonioli

Bruno Tonioli is the unmistakably flamboyant Italian who has entertained Strictly Come Dancing's countless fans for very nearly a decade. Bruno lights up every episode of the smash UK show - as well as Dancing in the Stars in the USA - with his high-energy, warm and deliciously humourous critiques of the celebrity contestants. For the very first time, fans can now read all about this highly engaging and life-affirming man who has rapidly established himself as a British national treasure.Born to staunchly working class parents and raised in a very conservative Catholic village in northern Italy, Tonioli knew from the age of 8 that he was not constructed like many of the other boys he played with. Forced to train for a 'proper job' as a bank clerk, Bruno was eventually to find a way to express his creative abilities and ended up a dancer and then a renowned choreographer, arriving in Britain in the early 1980s. His career took off and he found himself immersed in the buzz and hedonism of the vibrant 80s scene, rubbing shoulders with the great and the good from the worlds of theatre, music and film. Wonderfully rich and colourful stories from this era abound.For Bruno, the last decade has - of course - been very largely about the Strictly phenomenon, and his memoirs do not disappoint in taking fans behind the scenes to witness for themselves the magical ingredients of one of the most popular shows on TV. The book will delight with its warmth, depth and wonderful sense of joie de vivre.

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Tuffers' Cricket Tales

Phil Tufnell
Authors:
Phil Tufnell

Phil Tufnell, aka 'Tuffers', is the much-loved English cricketer from the 1990s who has now become one of this country's favourite broadcasters. Not cast from the same mould as other players of his generation, Tufnell became a cult figure for his unorthodox approach to the game ... and to life in general. 'Tuffers' Cricket Tales' is a deliciously eccentric collection of the great man's favourite cricket stories that will amuse and inform in equal measure. Tufnell's unmistakably distinctive voice, as heard to such good effect on 'Test Match Special', steers fans through dozens and dozens of terrifically entertaining and insightful anecdotes, garnered from his 25-year playing and broadcasting career. He introduces a cast of genuinely colourful characters found in dressing-rooms and commentary boxes from around the world, and in the process offers a uniquely warm and quirky homage to his sport. A perfect Father's Day gift for all cricket fans.

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Michael Douglas: Acting on Instinct

John Parker
Authors:
John Parker

In the shadow of his father Kirk's overpowering fame, Michael Douglas forged a career for himself and became recognised in his own right as an award-winning actor and producer. But fame has taken its toll on Michael's personal life. His struggles with sexual addiction, his treatment for alcoholism and drug dependency and the break-up of his first marriage show another side to Michael's success. In 2010, his troubled past came back to haunt him when Cameron, his eldest son, was sentenced to five years in prison for drug dealing. Yet, despite a rocky road, Michael has found happiness later in life. His marriage to Catherine Zeta Jones meant a second shot at fatherhood and gave him strength following a devastating diagnosis of advanced throat cancer at the age of 65. This is the compelling and remarkable story of a Hollywood son who waged a battle against the odds to achieve his fame and fortune, and has kept on fighting with every challenge he faces.

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Different Country, Same State: On The Road With James Blunt

Peter Hardy
Authors:
Peter Hardy

213 performances, 58 countries, 15 months. James Blunt's 'All the Lost Souls' international tour was one of the greatest pop marathons of all time.Journalist and family friend Peter Hardy joined James and his band on their exhilarating and exhausting journey around the world, hoping to discover the man behind the music. From the tour bus to the dressing rooms, from the stage to the after-show parties, travelling with James gave 'Weird Uncle Peter' an access-all-areas pass to his life on tour.A warts-and-all account of lost guitars, adoring fans, ludicrous bar bills and very, very late nights, this is an honest, amusing and insightful look at the mad world of celebrity and the inside story of James himself, both in front of the crowds and behind closed doors.DIFFERENT COUNTRY, SAME STATE is a frank exploration of one man's journey, his passion for music and his passion for life.

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Michael Douglas: Acting on Instinct

John Parker
Authors:
John Parker

In the shadow of his father Kirk's overpowering fame, Michael Douglas forged a career for himself and became recognised in his own right as an award-winning actor and producer.But fame has taken its toll on Michael's personal life. His struggles with sexual addiction, his treatment for alcoholism and drug dependency and the break-up of his first marriage show another side to Michael's success. In 2010, his troubled past came back to haunt him when Cameron, his eldest son, was sentenced to five years in prison for drug dealing.Yet, despite a rocky road, Michael has found happiness later in life. His marriage to Catherine Zeta Jones meant a second shot at fatherhood and gave him strength following a devastating diagnosis of advanced throat cancer at the age of 65.This is the compelling and remarkable story of a Hollywood son who waged a battle against the odds to achieve his fame and fortune, and has kept on fighting with every challenge he faces.

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Making the Rounds with Oscar

Dr David Dosa
Authors:
Dr David Dosa

The extraordinary - and true - story of a cat with a remarkable giftIn the summer of 2007 Oscar the cat made headlines around the world. Why? Because he knows when the patients in the Rhode Island hospice where he lives are going to die. Oscar curls up on their beds, keeps them company and enables the families to be with their loved ones at the end. Dr David Dosa's job is to respond to people's medical needs, treat them for their ailments and communicate with their families. Oscar takes care of the rest. He is a steady companion and, because of him, patients don't die alone. Can a cat really predict death? Is he smelling something or responding to behavioural clues? Is he helping guide souls to heaven? Oscar's warm and profound story is heartfelt, sometimes even funny, but always inspiring.

Hachette Scotland

A Shirt Box Full of Songs

Barbara Dickson
Authors:
Barbara Dickson

From singing to the postman when she was two years old to her annual sell-out tours in the 2000s, Barbara Dickson has been captivating her fans for the best part of sixty years. In her autobiography she describes the joys of growing up in Fife with her talented brother and loving parents, of moving to Edinburgh to find her place in the world and the stresses and strains of trying to make a living on the Scottish folk scene.Not content to have just a successful singing career, she turned to another: acting. A regular on prime-time television, Barbara also took to musicals and was the original lead role in Spend, Spend, Spend. Her hugely successful time onstage earned her many acting accolades but her pursuit of perfection led to complete exhaustion from which she fought hard to recover.Barbara writes beautifully about the close relationships she cultivated over these years with people such as Willy Russell, Elaine Paige and Billy Connolly. The result is a warm, fascinating story encompassing the best of British music, stage and television.

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The True Naomi Story

A.M. Goldsher
Authors:
A.M. Goldsher

It's every girl's dream: to be catapulted from a boring, everyday existence into a world of fame, riches, adoring fans and critical acclaim. This fabulous and page-turning novel follows the path of the loveable Naomi, from her days waiting tables in New York's East Village, to signing a record deal and playing packed stadium gigs. It's as if one day she woke up to find the dreams she had as a shy, gawky teenager from nerdsville had all come true at once... But stardom isn't always all it's cracked up to be. Soon Naomi's adrift in a world where lovers are players, where friends quickly become enemies, and where you never quite know just who you can trust. Can Naomi learn to play the game of fame before her star comes tumbling down?

Headline Review

Could It Be Forever? My Story

David Cassidy
Authors:
David Cassidy
Posted by Richard Roper, Editorial

Blog: Musical Mystery Tour

We all have that moment at one time or another when a piece of music comes on in the background and you have to stop what you're doing and just listen. This is a regular occurrence for me on Friday afternoons as fellow Headliner Bríd launches into a rendition of an eighties classic and I stop what I'm doing and wonder why cats are fighting with dentists' drills in the office.

THE HEIST

Our ebook of the month is THE HEIST, the first adventure in an electrifying new series from Janet Evanovich and Lee Goldberg.

Stirred, not shaken...

Blog: Book Slam with Bond

In a year that’s included Budapest’s European First Novel Festival, Fowey Festival in the heart of Daphne du Maurier country, and the Edinburgh International Book Festival, it was my last event of 2013 that turned out to be my favourite of all. The other Sunday I took part in Book Slam at The Tabernacle in Notting Hill, along with William Boyd, musician Ana Silvera, and poet and playwright Inua Ellams. Yes, I did say William Boyd. He of the latest Bond novel, Solo. He of Any Human Heart, which is only one of my favourite books of all time. Fine company, indeed. Book Slam was founded around ten years ago by award-winning writer Patrick Neate. The Guardian’s Robert McCrum says ‘Book Slam describes itself as “London’s leading literary shindig” and it is’. Meanwhile Simon Armitage reckons it’s ‘music hall meets night club meets book club’. There are a ton of live literature events out there these days, a very different landscape to when Book Slam started out, and many have their own distinctive qualities. All to the good, I say. There’s still something brilliantly pure about the simple act of being read to - it’s how most of us first experienced stories, after all. Among the Book Slam crowd something of a campfire spirit prevails, rapt faces listening in the dark, creating an experience that’s both solitary and intimately shared. Then a musician comes on, then a poet, a comedian. It’s this combination that makes Book Slam unique. The floor rips up with laughter. The appreciation is raucous. These nights have always attracted a band of stellar supporters, the likes of Dave Eggers, Zadie Smith, David Nicholls, Hari Kunzru. Earlier this year Caitlin Moran and Hadley Freeman shared a stage, and later this month you can catch Chuck Palahniuk. Then there are the newer faces, which Team Book Slam are always keen to champion too. That’s how I found myself at The Tabernacle with William Boyd last week. Trying not to be too sycophantic I told William how happy and slightly amazed I was to be sharing a billing with him, and he twinkled (he did!) and said ‘that’s Book Slam’. So last week then, 007 and me. The tables are laid out cabaret-style, and the drinks are flowing. I’ve done a few events by now and I’m starting to grow sort of used to a formula. Only the set-up here is a little bit different. No panel, no Q&A, no other author sitting reassuringly alongside… just you, a microphone and a spotlight – quite an exposing combination, which probably adds to the allure for the audience. The last time I was faced with a similar sort of thing, at an Amnesty event in Edinburgh, I couldn’t read for crying, but that’s another story (one you can read here, if you really want to). Anyway, I took a breath and pictured the audience naked, and let me tell you, the Notting Hill crowd that night were a fine-looking bunch. I read two passages from A Heart Bent Out of Shape and told the story that led to the writing of one of them, involving a disastrous haircut, an elderly man, and une tarte magnifique. All in all, I had a ball, and the best part was that when I was through, I got to sit back and enjoy the rest of the show – Ana Silvera’s haunting rhythms and amazing musicality, William Boyd radiating inimitable venerability as he told us about his special recipe for salad dressing, and Inua Ellam’s impeccable hosting, rounding off the night with three of his poems to massive applause. This very month, five years ago, I took a course with the Arvon Foundation, and was lucky enough to have Book Slam’s founding father Patrick as one of my tutors. As Inua said, ‘feels like you’ve come full circle’, and it did. I’m a sentimental thing at the best of times, but this knowledge definitely added to my pleasure in taking part. So… thank you, Patrick, and to Book Slam cohort Elliott Jack, too. It was a real treat. If all this has tickled your fancy, it happens roughly monthly, at places like The Tabernacle, The Clapham Grand, and The Flyover, and even sometimes here in Brizzle, with Nikesh Shukla at the helm. There’s a brilliant podcast, a YouTube channel, and two volumes of short story collections, published in the last two years. They’re also branching into ventures of the culinary variety, with School Dinners, which sounds immeasurably more nourishing (mind and body) than any school dinner I’ve ever had. Book Slam’s original philosophy was to ‘promote the diversity of contemporary literature, support writers, and break down the boundaries between ‘literary’ and ‘popular’ culture’. I think ‘make it fun’ was probably in there somewhere too. Are they still living up to it? In the spirit of Bond, I’ll defer to Carly Simon…. “Nobody Does It Better…”

Posted by Leah Woodburn, Editorial

Blog: Our First Blog Post!

Welcome! We’re very excited that we now have somewhere to air our news and views on all things publishing and beyond. Think of it as a work in progress for now: it will, before we know it, be a slick and well-oiled machine. Until then, be kind…

TOUCH AND GO

The Sunday Times top ten bestseller Lisa Gardner's latest thriller, TOUCH AND GO, is out now in paperback. Here's an exclusive look at chapter one to whet your appetite...

Suzanne Brockmann talks about her bestselling series, and reveals the book closest to her heart…

Meet the Troubleshooters

When wrote your first Troubleshooters book, THE UNSUNG HERO, could you imagine that it would be come such hugely successful and popular series? And did you envisage it would run for so many books? I hoped it would succeed! It was my intention, right from the start, to do something that was unusual - at the time - for contemporary romance novels. I wanted to weave subplots into my books that did not deliver the tried-and-true happily-ever-after that readers expected. I think that by guaranteeing a HEA ending, we sometimes cheat our readers out of experiencing a fuller range of emotions.

Posted by Myke Cole, author

Blog: Reflections on New York Comic Con

You might want to sit down for this one, it’s going to come as a bit of a shock. I hate to be the guy who pulls the rug out from under you, who shatters the tender illusion under which you’ve lived your entire life until now. The Internet didn’t always exist. No, I’m serious. There was a time when people didn’t have the means to communicate instantly, to answer nearly any question, to check in on the hilarious antics of anyone’s cat, at any time, anywhere in the world. It was a dark time. Marriages collapsed as the lack of Wikipedia meant that couples couldn’t resolve arguments with the click of a mouse. People starved to death, lost on unfamiliar roads, without their iPhone’s maps feature to guide them to civilization. Cats rode Roombas, dashed into paper bags, cuddled up beside dogs without anyone to witness their heart-breakingly cute hilarity. I’ve been called a tough guy because I’ve been to war, but I think the real testament to my durability was that I lived through this Dark Age. It was especially tough on nerds. We thrive on minutiae, esoteric cultural touchstones that are precious to us precisely because they are so rare. It’s hard to find a guy who can identify all the different types of Storm Trooper armor (and yes, that includes the Emperor’s Royal Guard) at a glance, who can tell you the THAC0 for a 3rd level Thief without having to look it up. When we meet those who can, we bond with them, reveling in a sense of cultural identity which I am assuming is the cousin to how Masai feel when they celebrate a warrior killing yet another lion. With a spear. By himself. Anyway, with no Internet, it was harder to find one another, especially when reaching out to the wrong person could get you mercilessly teased, or worse, smacked around and stuffed in a locker. To facilitate the location and bonding process, we nerds were drawn to gatherings known as “cons.” (And no, they didn’t involve tricking kindly old ladies out of their life savings). Generally held in hotels, these gatherings allowed a few hundred of us to bond in safety, reveling in our tribal songs (filking) and interpretive dances (LARPing). It also doubled as pretty much the only place on earth any of us would ever have a chance in hell of kissing a member of the opposite sex. I lived for cons. My life was one interminable stretch of time between them, each a crucible I had to get through until the next long weekend among my own. They all had cool names playing on their root word: Lunacon, Balticon, Confusion, Boskone. Okay, so that last one kind of fell down on the job, but you get the idea. They were always put on by fans, run by volunteers, usually operating at a loss. Science Fiction and Fantasy is one of the few genres where the majority of the pros come up through fandom, and cons were peppered liberally with authors, editors and literary agents, all doing their business networking in a morass of joy that gave them a uniform expression of I-can’t-believe-I-make-money-doing-this. It was at cons that my burgeoning interest in the genre became a professional ambition. I met my agent at Philcon, sat in the lobby until 3AM talking about everything other than writing. I first met my editor and her assistant at a con. Fast forward a-number-of-years-I-am-uncomortable-stating-because-I-am-really-really-old. A perfect storm of genre successes in popular culture (a string of outstanding superhero flicks, Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings movies, a surge in adult acceptance of video games, which are almost always SF/F based), and some literary successes (Harry Potter, Twilight, Eragon) helped propel Science Fiction and Fantasy into the mainstream. At the same time, the pervasiveness of the Internet began to erode the old fan-run con culture. When you can find thousands of like-minded people at the click of a mouse, why bother traveling hundreds of miles to spend a weekend at an expensive hotel? The shared vocabulary was online. Everything, from role-playing games to fan-fiction, was available in an instant. Those who accuse Internet addicts of isolation are fools. The Internet is a fundamentally social phenomenon. It is a new way that people form bonds. Cons began to gray. The panels became repetitive, the programming staff focusing more and more on holding on to their salad days, while the genre moved on without them. I don’t know when it first happened, but somewhere along the way, someone perked up and noticed that the con culture was still being applied to a small subsection of society, but revolved around a genre that was now immensely popular. The appeal was broad enough that people were willing to spend a lot of money for their articles of faith: action figures, specialized t-shirts, special edition DVDs, oceans and oceans of books. Boom. The for-profit con was born. There are comic cons all over the country now. It seems like every major city has one. While the old fan-run cons attract hundreds, these pull in tens of thousands, packing the largest venues of major cities so full that it takes an attendee 20 minutes to walk 20 feet. They transcend genre now, have become pop culture celebrations, pulling in film, television and gaming executives hawking wares from straight comedy to mainstream drama, with nary a superhero in sight. And there’s still more money to be made, with venue after venue springing up to meet demand. Wizard World, Dragon Con, the Sci-Fi Weekender. There’s a tribal petulance for those of us who were there first, who saw the birth of the con and grew up in the bosom of its larval state. This new age of mega cons makes us want to shake our fists and call the beautiful people thronging the halls of the Javitts Center Johnny-Come-Latelys (and if one more model unilaterally declares herself “Queen of the Nerds,” I will go ballistic). They are, after all, the people who took our lunch money, who wouldn’t date us. Walk through Williamsburg, Brooklyn and you’re bound to see a guy who has never played D&D in his life sporting a “THIS IS HOW I ROLL” T-shirt, emblazoned with a 20-sided die. But we go, of course. Comic Con is a focal point of my year, the happiest long weekend of the annual cycle. And that’s because I remembered something from my early days as a writer. When my best friend hit it huge as a professional genre writer before I did, I made the conscious decision not to be jealous. A rising tide lifts all boats, I told myself, and it was true. His success didn’t hinder mine in the least. In fact, it helped me when my turn came. The same is true here. I was drawn to cons of hundreds for the same reason folks are drawn to cons of hundreds of thousands: Because the genre is amazing, because a thing shared is so much more wonderful than a thing enjoyed privately. Because nothing in life can beat the simple animal pleasure of turning to a stranger and saying “That is so awesome!” and having them smile knowingly and say “it really is!” It is a brief moment where we are not alone. As I walk through New York Comic Con (or rather, as I ride the shoulders of my enormous colleague Sam Sykes to avoid getting trampled by the horde), I see the legions of fans thronging the aisles. In junior high school, most of these people likely wouldn’t have been my friends. But they are now. A rising tide lifts all boats. Man, it just keeps going up and up, year after year. And the view from here is glorious.

Pam St Clement

The End of an Earring

In January 2012, one of EastEnders' longest-serving and best-loved characters breathed her last when Pat Butcher succumbed to cancer. Her departure from the show gave actress Pam St Clement time to reflect, not only on almost 26 years playing a role that she loved, but also on her whole life. Pam's mother died when she was a baby, leaving her with a father whose life didn't really have space for a child. What followed was an itinerant childhood, with various stepmothers and foster families, before an advertisement in The Lady took 11-year-old Pamela to the farm in Devon that was to become her true home, with the 'aunts' who became her surrogate parents. Time on the farm at Dartmoor, where she discovered her love of animals, alternated with life at The Warren boarding school in West Sussex, where she discovered her passion for acting. On leaving school, Pam was unsure of what direction to take but gradually realised that acting was what she wanted to do with her life. So, in 1966, Pam took up a place at drama school. Pam settled in London and worked on stage and television throughout the sixties and seventies, before her first appearance on EastEnders in 1986 and the offer of a permanent role a few months later. This memoir is far more than simply an actor's tale. Quite apart from her fascinating and unique childhood, Pam also recalls her involvement in the women's movement of the 1970s, her lifelong love of animals and the worries about her weight that have dogged her since her teenage years. It is also a tribute to Pat Butcher, for whom Pam retains a huge affection. This incredibly warm memoir reveals the woman behind the popular EastEnders' character, a woman who, apart perhaps from her earrings, couldn't be more different from Pat.