Related to: 'Kathryn Hughes'

Wildfire

Lying To You

Amanda Reynolds
Authors:
Amanda Reynolds

Following on from her eBook bestseller Close To Me, Amanda Reynolds is back with Lying To You, another gripping psychological drama. Perfect for fans of The Husband's Secret and I Let You Go.You'd know if you were lying to yourself, wouldn't you?When Jess Tidy was Mark Winter's student, she made an accusation that ultimately saw him sentenced to three years in prison. A jury found him guilty, but he always maintained his innocence. Now, Jess's mother's death has brought her back to the village where she grew up, and where Mark still lives with his wife. And the truth about that night ten years ago which nearly destroyed them both is finally going to come out.A gripping drama with dark twists and turns, perfect for fans of Liane Moriarty and the BBC series Doctor Foster.

Headline Review

The Key

Kathryn Hughes
Authors:
Kathryn Hughes

'Riveting' Lesley Pearse on The Letter. 'Gripping' Good Housekeeping on The Secret. From Kathryn Hughes, the #1 bestselling author of The Letter and The Secret, comes a powerful, shocking, heartbreaking story set to get everyone talking in spring 2018. 1956 It's Ellen Crosby's first day at work as a student nurse at Fairhaven County Lunatic Asylum. When she meets Amy Sullivan, a young woman committed for allegedly attempting to drown herself and her stepsister, and Dr Stephen Lambourn, a pioneering physician keen to try out the various 'cures' available for mental illness, little does Ellen know that a choice she will make is to change all their lives irrevocably...Present dayUnder the cover of darkness, a young woman, Kate, picks her way through the brambles to the abandoned Fairhaven Asylum. A vast building with over six miles of corridors, the asylum still houses the metal-framed beds, rusty instruments and infamous padded cells used before it closed its doors for the last time. In an old wardrobe, Kate discovers a suitcase belonging to a female patient who was admitted to the asylum in 1956. The shocking contents of the suitcase lead Kate to unravel a forgotten story of tragedy, lost love and an old wrong that only Kate may have the power to put right.

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Love Me or Leave Me

Josephine Cox
Authors:
Josephine Cox

No.1 bestselling writer Josephine Cox is 'hailed quite rightly as a gifted writer in the tradition of Catherine Cookson' (Manchester Evening News). Love Me or Leave Me is a heartrending story of love and friendship and the obstacles that may come between. Perfect for fans of Lyn Andrews and Catherine Cookson.Beautiful Eva Bereton has just three close friends: Patsy, whom she looks upon as a sister; Bill, once her childhood sweetheart, now married and living in Canada; and her mother, to whom she is devoted. When a tragic accident turns Eva's world upside down, Patsy is the only one she can turn to.A hated figure from the past comes to reclaim the farm and business that Eva had always believed were her parents'. Not even Bill, still in love with Eva, can stop Eva being thrown out on the streets. Together with Patsy, Eva starts a new life far away.Luckily, they find work and lodgings wherever they settle. But when Eva arrives in Blackburn her past mistakes rise up to haunt her. Yet even when threatened from all sides Eva will never accept that her chances of happiness have been destroyed. Determined and optimistic, she fights on to change her life for the better.

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A Time for Us

Josephine Cox
Authors:
Josephine Cox

A classic novel, heartbreaking and emotional, from Sunday Times bestselling writer Josephine Cox, 'hailed quite rightly as a gifted writer in the tradition of Catherine Cookson' Manchester Evening News. A Time For Us is perfect for fans of Lesley Pearse and Rosie Goodwin. Lucy Nolan is the golden girl. The only daughter of local grocers, Sally and Mike Nolan, she's grown up in a home of total love and security. The one thing her heart desires is that Jack Hanson might ask her to marry him, and when he does eventually propose, Lucy is prepared to give up everything to be with him - even though it means leaving her beloved parents to live abroad where Jack has been offered an exciting business opportunity.But then, almost on the eve of the marriage itself, tragedy strikes. And for the first time in her life, Lucy is forced to realise that Fate, which has been so kind to her, can also be just as cruel.

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Looking Back

Josephine Cox
Authors:
Josephine Cox

No.1 bestselling writer Josephine Cox is 'hailed quite rightly as a gifted writer in the tradition of Catherine Cookson' (Manchester Evening News). Looking Back is an irresistible novel perfect for fans of Lyn Andrews and Catherine Cookson.From the moment she learns of the stranger's visit, Molly Tattersall is filled with a sense of fear. Then her mother disappears, leaving behind a letter asking Molly to take care of her five brothers and sisters. Molly's wayward father rejects his responsibilities, leaving Molly to choose between the young man she has given her heart to, and the family she adores. It is the cruellest decision of her life, with long-reaching and heartbreaking consequences. Only one thing is certain: Molly's life will never be the same again.

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Firestarter

Ben Stokes
Authors:
Ben Stokes
Headline Review

The Secret

Kathryn Hughes
Authors:
Kathryn Hughes

KATHRYN HUGHES' MAGNIFICENT NEW NOVEL THE KEY IS AVAILABLE TO PRE-ORDER NOWThe Secret is the unmissable second novel from Kathryn Hughes, the #1 bestselling author of The Letter. A powerful, twisting story that will grip you and break your heart, it is perfect for fans of The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks and The Secret Wife by Gill Paul.'Gripping' Good Housekeeping on The Secret. Mary has been nursing a secret. Forty years ago, she made a choice that would change her world for ever, and alter the path of someone she holds dear.Beth is searching for answers. She has never known the truth about her parentage, but finding out could be the lifeline her sick child so desperately needs. When Beth finds a faded newspaper cutting amongst her mother's things, she realises the key to her son's future lies in her own past. She must go back to where it all began to unlock...The Secret.What readers are saying about the unputdownable stories of Kathryn Hughes:'Get set to be hooked' 'A page-turner from the very beginning''This is one of the BEST BOOKS I have ever read''I cried buckets of tears reading it''A beautifully told, tragic tale'

Headline Review

The Letter

Kathryn Hughes
Authors:
Kathryn Hughes
Headline

Vagabonds

Josephine Cox
Authors:
Josephine Cox
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Alley Urchin

Josephine Cox
Authors:
Josephine Cox
Headline

The Mulberry Field

Anne Goring
Authors:
Anne Goring

Emily Wroe has never known her mother. Raised in a Bristol foundling home, as a young mother she is sent to skivvy at a run-down country inn. The Thorn Tree's fortunes are about to change, for the innkeeper's wife is determined to profit from the increasing numbers of gentry travelling to Bath. She soon realises that her new maid is a bright and talented girl, and Emily finds herself with a mentor, friend, prospects - and the love of Luke Gilpin, who wishes to marry her. Then Felix Winterbourne arrives at the inn, and nothing is ever the same again. Charming and enigmatic, Felix is a gentleman but he leads a double life which takes him into a very dangerous world. Emily is shocked when she discovers his secret, but she cannot resist her attraction to him. Drawn inexorably into intrigue and tragedy, she is about to find the key to her own past...Set against a backdrop of Huguenots, highwaymen and mysterious manor houses, The Mulberry Field a deliciously romantic read which will delight Anne Goring's many fans.

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Bad Boy Jack

Josephine Cox
Authors:
Josephine Cox

Unable to cope with raising his children alone, Robert Sullivan abandons them to others, until he has a change of heart and decides to go back for them. But on the way there, he is involved in a horrific accident.Jack and Nancy are placed in the brutal regime of the Galloway Children's Home, where Jack's devotion to his sister and fiery temper land him in more trouble. The children find themselves at the mercy of the corrupt Clive Ennington, who splits them up and sells Nancy off to the highest bidder. Meanwhile Mary, Robert's only love, is forced to seek a new life for herself. She decides to marry Paul Marshall, the handsome owner of a seaside guesthouse but her chance of happiness is threatened by his embittered aunt. As Robert recovers in hospital he is determined to find and reunite his family. But when he realises the terrible consequences of his actions, he begins to wonder if he will ever see Mary and the children again.

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Vale Valhalla

Joy Chambers
Authors:
Joy Chambers

As the year 2001 approaches the men who fought in the Great War have all but faded away, and only the memory of their sacrifice will be preserved. Between 1914 and 1918 soldiers from all over the world converged on the trenches of Belgium and Northern France: from Australia and New Zealand, Canada, England, India, Ireland, Scotland, South Africa, Wales and the far reaches of the British Empire they came to fight alongside the Belgians and the French.Vale Valhalla traces the lives of a group of Australians through the years prior to, and during, the First World War, and reveals how they were forever altered by their sufferings in that singular and relentless conflict.

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Nobody's Darling

Josephine Cox
Authors:
Josephine Cox

Lizzie Miller worries about her beautiful eldest daughter. A mother shouldn't have favourites, but Ruby wins a special place in Lizzie's heart. Money is short in their little house in Blackburn, and Ruby yearns to give her beloved family a better life. Determined to enjoy the security only wealth can bring, she stifles her feelings for handsome Johnny Ackroyd. Ruby knows he cannot offer her the life she craves. She works as a maid for Mr Banks and his daughter, Cicely. The two girls hatch a mischievous plan to introduce Ruby to society at a party for the 'gentry' of Blackburn, where Ruby meets Luke Arnold, the dissolute heir to his father's fortunes. Seeing Ruby's dark beauty, he determines to despoil her innocence. When Luke slyly turns his charm on Cicely, Ruby feels compelled to warn her friend of his evil nature. Ruby quickly finds employment in a milliner's shop, and eventually takes over the business. But her worldly success still leaves an emptiness that riches cannot fill, and Ruby learns at last that the love of family and friends is beyond price . . .

TOUCH AND GO

The Sunday Times top ten bestseller Lisa Gardner's latest thriller, TOUCH AND GO, is out now in paperback. Here's an exclusive look at chapter one to whet your appetite...

By Clemency Burton-Hill

New York, New York

Being a freelance writer has its upsides and its down; but an indisputable up is the ability to choose one’s office daily. As I write, I am sitting in a small café on Hudson and Charles, spotted on a whim as I crossed over the street from Seventh Avenue. It boasts walls of exposed old brick and studiedly shabby wooden furniture; a vinyl record of jazz turns on a gramophone in the corner. October sunlight slants lazily across the street and slinks in through the café windows, gilding a wall of analogue photographs depicting the proprietor’s great-grandparents in curling sepia. It is late 2012; the New York headquarters of some of the twenty-first-century’s most cutting-edge technology companies are in the vicinity; but with this chipped mug of coffee in my hands here and that Charlie Parker LP spinning there, I could be occupying the sort of contemplative corner spot that any number of human characters in New York may have occupied before me. Other years, other faces, other times. People sometimes complain that Greenwich Village, like much in Manhattan, has “altered beyond recognition” and I’m sure in many ways it has – it is in the very nature of this town; the very name of this town, to enshrine the possibility of change. But I also know, I feel intuitively, that there is still in these streets the unwavering spirit of the old city, catering generously and eternally to the needs of those whose hearts are open, curious and yearning. There’s no place like this on earth. In other words, New York’s still got it. **** When I turned eighteen, I was given a subscription to the New Yorker for my birthday. A decade later, almost to the day, I moved to Manhattan and for the first few months I lived here, the simplest and most wondrous of the inestimable gifts this city bestows seemed to be this: that I could open those storied pages, flip to Goings On About Town, and, if I so desired, “go on about town”. I could read about a jazz gig, a book reading, a film opening, a symphony or rock concert, an opera, a play, a new restaurant and, bank balance permitting, experience it that same night. Back in my hometown of London – itself a city not without wonder – reading the Goings On section of the New Yorker became a weekly act of masochism, yielding predictable twists of almost palpable longing. To read about what was happening that same night across the Atlantic; to dream, to imagine, but to only be able to imagine – to not be in New York was sometimes too much to bear. Yet this is a city that has always been created by the imagination; a metropolis lovingly constructed in ink and paper and celluloid and dreams as much as it is by bricks and mortar, steel and glass. To borrow an insight from that master observer of New York, E. B. White, there are roughly three New Yorks: that of the natives, that of the commuters, and that of the settlers. That notion was true when White wrote “Here is New York” in 1948, and it strikes me as being resoundingly true today. Like him, I believe that the third New York will always be the most important, the most vital, because it is the one whose foundations are laid first in the minds of human beings born and living elsewhere – those for whom New York City is the ultimate destination. When the settler-dreamers hit the bedrock, having crossed bodies of water, been coughed up through tubes or tunnels or deposited by planes, it is up to them – to us – to turn those dreams into something resembling reality. And because New York has a unique capacity to absorb whatever is thrown at it and whomever arrives on its shores, they invariably do play their own unique part in shaping what happens next in the mighty pageant that is life here. Although, not always: New York also spits out more dejected and disappointed souls than any other city on earth. We transplanted “New Yorkers” must also live with the lurking shadow of that possibility every day. **** The music fades, the needle lifts, and a bearded barista with complicated tattoos on his forearms whom I’d wager lives in Brooklyn goes to flip the record to its B-Side. Which reminds me of a startling fact: the first jazz disc ever to be cut in the world was cut in New York. Ever in the world! It was Nick La Rocca’s Original Dixieland Jazz Band with “Livery Stable Blues”, in early 1917. But I plucked that particular “first” from the sky; really it’s not so startling – New York is a city of firsts. A city of human beings calmly doing things that will forever alter the direction of how those things can be done. From sculptors to subway contractors; from traders of sundries to traders of derivatives; from writers of music to writers of insurance to writers of code. Right now, I wonder, how many blocks am I from wonder? A short stroll in any direction and I might run into a movie crew shooting on a corner of Bleecker whose young director, as yet unknown, will win an Oscar next year; I might walk past an innocuous office building on Houston in which employees at a start-up whose name we’ve never heard of are busy inventing the next game-changing technology that we will soon all take for granted; I may glance at construction workers on a downtown skyscraper site whose silhouette will one day be a byword, a metaphor, a symbol for something the whole world understands – or maybe will just be a building so beautiful it makes people weep. This guy sitting next to me, meanwhile, tapping away on his laptop; for all I know he could be writing the world’s next Booker-winning novel. This is New York. Since arriving at this café, moreover, I have seen through these sunlit windows every sort of human face pass along Hudson Street. Even here, in this achingly well-heeled neighborhood where a brownstone townhouse around the corner on Perry is apparently on the market at fifteen million dollars (“What the hell – I’ll take two!”) I have seen faces old and young; faces black and brown and pink and white and many shades of grey. Faces beautiful and completely unmemorable; faces brimful of life; faces seemingly close to death. Perhaps these faces come from Puerto Rico, from Sierra Leone, from Mexico, England, Haiti, Cuba, Latvia, Kenya, Russia, Ireland or Italy. Perhaps from China, Tunisia, Wales, India, Jamaica, New Zealand, Greece or Poland. Perhaps they were born in a gleaming hospital uptown, or in a railroad apartment in an outer borough; perhaps they were born half way around the world. But here in New York they are. And as White memorably observed: “the collision and the intermingling of these millions of foreign-born people representing so many races and creeds make New York a permanent exhibit of the phenomenon of one world.” The phenomenon of one world. We know all this, of course. New York as a racial melting pot, a magnet for all comers, a global crucible of creativity: all of this has been said in myriad ways, by multitudes and over many years. But just as New York has every type of potential racial problem and for the most part enjoys a continuing and frankly miraculous city-wide tolerance, an “inviolate truce” between peoples, what astounds me is how the things we know about the city – the clichés and stereotypes, the myths and legends – go on being true, and indeed, get truer. Why? How? How do you work, New York? How are you even plausible? **** When you tell people you live in New York, I have found, reactions generally divide into those whose eyes widen with envy and those who wrinkle their brows in horror – or, worse, pity. “Oh no,” they shake their head, “I could never live there – so noisy, so dirty, so smelly. And why does everyone have to be so unbelievably rude?” There are also those who grumble that New York has somehow lost its character; been homogenised and commercialised and overrun by identical shops, adverts and tourists who genuinely appear to think queuing outside Abercrombie & Fitch a valid use of time. Well, yes. Surely Broadway has its grim bits; clearly one does well to avoid Times Square. Obviously you ignore the horse-and-cart guys in Central Park and of course you don’t eat at Olive Garden or wait forty-five minutes for a Magnolia Bakery cupcake. And of course New York is smelly and dirty and busy and crowded. If White thought in 1948 that “the normal frustrations of modern life are here multiplied and amplified” he would possibly be dismayed (but not surprised) to discover that more than half a century on there is still “not enough air and not enough light, and there is usually either too much heat or too little”. But in general, I believe, New York still has more life and curiosity and character in a single city block than even – dare I say it – London. And I’m a born and bred London girl who once suspected that if you were to cut my veins I would bleed the Thames. (I have also lived in Paris, and - hit me over the head with a baguette – I’m afraid that glorious capital does not compare either.) For more than three years, for example, my local Subway stop has been Grand Central. Rushing across the Main Concourse before I head underground to catch a train, I try always to look up at the ceiling and promise myself I will never, ever take such a sight for granted. When back in London, equally, I remind myself not to sigh in inevitable disappointment when I board the Piccadilly Line to go home. It’s a grossly unfair comparison, of course: how could poor old Hammersmith, my local Tube, ever hope to win against those majestic cathedral glories on 42nd Street? But that’s the point, isn’t it? **** In January 2012, the population of the entire New York City metropolitan area hit nineteen million people. It can be lonely here; sometimes unutterably so: a teeming place of human isolation and even desperation. By Grand Central Station I have indeed sat down and wept. But as White also captured brilliantly: “Although New York often imparts a feeling of great forlornness or forsakenness… you always feel that either by shifting your location ten blocks or by reducing your fortune by five dollars you can experience rejuvenation.” Reducing one’s fortune by five dollars here, by the way, remains the easiest damn thing in the world. Another cup of coffee at this very café, especially if accompanied by one of those artisanal sea-salt cookies they bake downstairs, will barely leave me change from twice that. In a doorway down the street, some wit has stuck a poster referencing the iconic slogan: I CAN’T AFFORD TO  NY. It has probably never been more difficult or more expensive to live in New York. Yet I and so many others would not be anywhere else in the world. Shifting my location, I will take my five bucks and get another coffee at some other place, ten blocks away, twenty, or who knows where. It doesn’t matter where I go: I open the door and the universe awaits. CLEMENCY BURTON-HIL, NEW YORK CITY, OCTOBER 2012

CHAPTER SAMPLER

ebook of the month

An exclusive extract featuring New York Times bestseller John Lescroart's most popular character, lawyer Dismas Hardy, in his most personal case so far.

CHAPTER SAMPLER

EBOOK OF THE MONTH

AN EXCLUSIVE EXTRACT FROM PAUL DOHERTY'S 100th NOVEL: In the final days of Henry VIII, one man is there to witness the demise of a legend... Master historian Paul Doherty weaves his magic in an epic tale of murderous schemes and a blood-smattered political order.

Sheila O'Flanagan

Sheila O'Flanagan is the author of many bestselling novels including What Happened That Night, The Missing Wife, My Mother's Secret, If You Were Me, All For You (winner of the Irish Independent Popular Fiction Book of the Year Award) and Bad Behaviour. She worked in finance for several years, but always dreamed of writing fiction, and she is now a full-time writer, with over twenty bestselling titles published. She lives in Dublin with her husband. www.sheilaoflanagan.comTwitter @sheilaoflanagan Facebook.com/sheilabooks

By Marion Donaldson

How I Got Into Publishing

When I read CVs of people applying for entry level jobs in publishing today, I’m so impressed by the candidates’ presentation skills, their qualifications, their eloquence and confidence. I doubt that I was even half as eloquent in my untutored application letter and CV (painstakingly typed on a state-of-the-art electric typewriter – PCs were many years in the future!) when I applied for the position of secretary to the Managing Editor of Sphere Books, then a paperback-only imprint, back in the late 1970s.