Related to: 'Gill Paul'

Headline Review

Another Woman's Husband

Gill Paul
Authors:
Gill Paul

From the #1 bestselling author of The Secret Wife, Another Woman's Husband will be adored by all fans of The Crown. Wallis Simpson is brought enticingly to life in this gripping, moving novel about two women thrust into the spotlight, followed by scandal, touched by loss.'One of my favourite books of this year. Fascinating, glamorous and utterly compelling... historical fiction at its best' Tracy Rees, author of The Hourglass.'Another Woman's Husband is a marvellous, perfect read' The SunTwo women who challenged the Crown.Divided by time. Bound by a secret...1911At the age of fifteen, carefree Mary Kirk and indomitable Wallis Warfield meet at summer camp. Their friendship will survive heartbreaks, separation and the demands of the British Crown until it is shattered by one unforgivable betrayal...1997Rachel's romantic break in Paris with her fiancé ends in tragedy when the car ahead crashes. Inside was Princess Diana. Back in Brighton, Rachel is haunted by the accident, and intrigued to learn the princess had visited the last home of Wallis, Duchess of Windsor, only hours before the crash. Soon, the discovery of a long-forgotten link to Wallis Simpson leads Rachel to the truth behind a scandal that shook the world...Readers love ANOTHER WOMAN'S HUSBAND:'Riveting! I thoroughly enjoyed this intriguing tale of friendship and betrayal' Rosanna Ley'With superb story-telling and a lush backdrop of period detail...a novel that is impossible to put down, about two women who are impossible to forget. I loved it!' Hazel Gaynor'I devoured Another Woman's Husband in a few days. This has bestseller written all over it.' Louise Beech'With seamless ease Gill evokes the events and characters of two eras...with great verve and a smattering of delicious fictional licence. Delightful' Liz Trenow'Gill Paul has taken two of the twentieth century's most enigmatic women, one revered, the other reviled, and woven them into a deft story of friendship and betrayal' Kate Riordan'Compelling and full of surprises ****' The Lady'Sheds light on a scandal and a love story which deserves to be read by many. A fascinating read which made me lose several hours to this story. I have no hesitation in recommending it and am keen to see what time in history Gill Paul will turn her hand to next' Shaz's Book Blog

Headline Review

Six Tudor Queens: Anne Boleyn, A King's Obsession

Alison Weir
Authors:
Alison Weir

Anne Boleyn: A King's Obsession by bestselling historian Alison Weir, author of Katherine of Aragon: The True Queen, is the second captivating novel in the Six Tudor Queens series. An unforgettable portrait of the ambitious woman whose fate we know all too well, but whose true motivations may surprise you. Essential reading for fans of Philippa Gregory and Elizabeth Chadwick.'Weir is excellent on the little details that bring a world to life' GuardianThe young woman who changed the course of history.Fresh from the palaces of Burgundy and France, Anne draws attention at the English court, embracing the play of courtly love.But when the King commands, nothing is ever a game.Anne has a spirit worthy of a crown - and the crown is what she seeks. At any price. ANNE BOLEYN. The second of Henry's Queens. Her story. History tells us why she died. This powerful novel shows her as she lived.SIX TUDOR QUEENS. SIX NOVELS. SIX YEARS.(P)2017 Headline Publishing Group Ltd

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Smashing Physics

Jon Butterworth
Authors:
Jon Butterworth

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The Ocean at the End of the Lane

Neil Gaiman
Authors:
Neil Gaiman

WINNER OF THE SPECSAVERS NATIONAL BOOK AWARDS 2013 BOOK OF THE YEAR The Ocean at the End of the Lane is the bestselling magical novel from Neil Gaiman, one of the most brilliant storytellers of our generation and author of the epic novel American Gods, and the much-loved Sandman series. 'Possibly Gaiman's most lyrical, scary and beautiful work yet. It's a tale of childhood for grown-ups, a fantasy rooted in the darkest corners of reality' (Independent on Sunday). If you loved the mesmerising world of Erin Morgenstern's The Night Circus or were drawn into J.K. Rowling's magical universe, this book is for you. It began for our narrator forty years ago when the family lodger stole their car and committed suicide in it, stirring up ancient powers best left undisturbed. Dark creatures from beyond this world are on the loose, and it will take everything our narrator has just to stay alive: there is primal horror here, and menace unleashed - within his family and from the forces that have gathered to destroy it. His only defence is three women, on a farm at the end of the lane. The youngest of them claims that her duckpond is an ocean. The oldest can remember the Big Bang.The Ocean at the End of the Lane is a fable that reshapes modern fantasy: moving, terrifying and elegiac - as pure as a dream, as delicate as a butterfly's wing, as dangerous as a knife in the dark.

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The Silent Wife: The gripping bestselling novel of betrayal, revenge and murder…

A.S.A. Harrison
Authors:
A.S.A. Harrison

The New York Times bestsellerHaving nothing left to lose changes everything.Todd and Jodie have been together for more than twenty years. They are both aware their world is in crisis, though neither is willing to admit it. Todd is living a dual existence, while Jodie is living in denial. But she also likes to settle scores. When it becomes clear their affluent Chicago lifestyle could disintegrate at any moment, Jodie knows everything is at stake. It's only now she will discover just how much she's truly capable of...Shocking and compelling in equal measure, THE SILENT WIFE is a chilling portrayal of two people in turmoil and the lengths they will go to in order to protect themselves.

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Liberty Falling (Anna Pigeon Mysteries, Book 7)

Nevada Barr
Authors:
Nevada Barr
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For Freedom

Joy Chambers
Authors:
Joy Chambers
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Pack Men

Alan Bissett
Authors:
Alan Bissett

'That's why aw this-' Cage lifts his lager can, sweeps it round 180 degrees. '-means so much tay a man.'The crowd stamps and claps, a hundred and fifty thousand voices blending into one.In 2008 Glasgow Rangers FC reached a major European final. It was held in Manchester, a short hop from Scotland into England. Cue a colossal invasion: the largest movement of Scots over the border in history and the first time in hundreds of years that an English city was taken over. Chaos reigned.Pack Men is the fictional story of three pals and one child trapped inside this powderkeg. In a city rocking with beer, brotherhood and sectarianism, the boys struggle to hold onto their friendship, as they turn on each other and the police turn on them. And somehow one of them has to disclose a secret which he knows the others won't want to hear...With this novel, one of Scotland's leading young writers has created a scuffed comedy about male un-bonding and Britain unravelling.

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Golf on the Rocks

Gary Sutherland
Authors:
Gary Sutherland

Gary Sutherland was a lapsed golfer, until he acquired his late dad's putter. After studying a crumpled golf map of Scotland, Gary decided to embark on a voyage. His target was to play 18 rounds of golf on 18 Scottish islands in honour of his dad, a ship's captain who, when he wasn't at sea, was never off the golf course. His journey would take him from the Northern Isles to the Outer Hebrides. Playing in the Harris hail and Arran sunshine, he would encounter an odd variety of golfing hazards, including sheep on the tees, cows on the fairways and electric fences round the greens. This is golf in the raw - a million miles from St Andrews. It is a life-affirming tale of remembrance and discovery. It's about having a laugh and holding on to what's dear. And it's about a putter with magical properties. You can believe what you choose to, but it all happened...

Headline Review

Making the Rounds with Oscar

Dr David Dosa
Authors:
Dr David Dosa
Headline

A Small Town Affair

Rosie Wallace
Authors:
Rosie Wallace

A Delicious Recipe for Domestic Disaster:Take one small town where everyone thinks they know everyone else's business. Add three households:MP Mike Andrews, his wife Gill and two young children;Church of Scotland minister Tom Graham, his wife Ali, two teenage daughters and an afterthought; Sixty-something local businessman Jack Caldwell, and his childless wife Phyllis.Mix in several large dollops of scandal, some secrets and a tragedy.Turn up the heat and bring to the boil.Season with one eccentric old lady - Minty Oliver - and serve with the tabloid press and a big helping of local gossip.

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Blood Test (Alex Delaware series, Book 2)

Jonathan Kellerman
Authors:
Jonathan Kellerman

When the lid blows, violence is the result... Families can be pressure cookers of secrets and tensions, as psychologist Alex Delaware knows all too well in Blood Test, a taut thriller from New York Times No. 1 bestseller Jonathan Kellerman. Perfect for fans of David Baldacci and Harlan Coben.'A tour de force' - New York TimesDoctors believe that they can successfully treat five-year-old cancer patient, Woody Swope. But Woody's parents, members of a cult called 'The Touchers', are not only refusing the treatment, they're also threatening to remove him from the hospital.Psychologist Alex Delaware, is called in to talk the parents round. But before he can, the Swopes are gone and so is Woody. All that remains is a savagely ransacked and bloodied motel room, their teenage daughter, Nona, and an increasingly sinister case to solve. What readers are saying about Blood Test: 'A bit of escapism, sufficient realism to make it believable, some edge-of-the-seat thrills, chills, spills, and... hope''I thought it was edge of your seat stuff and could not wait to turn the next page''Brilliant writing'

Headline Review

Having the Builders in

Reay Tannahill
Authors:
Reay Tannahill

Dame Constance de Clair has a remarkable talent for getting what she wants. And, at this precise moment, she wants to transform her overly square castle, Vine Regis, by adding an extension. But all is not going according to plan...Quite apart from the fact that Constance's builders seem more intent on demolishing the existing castle than building the extension; her son's wife-to-be is determined to dislodge her as Lady of the Castle; her son appears more interested in going hunting than getting married; the French are threatening to invade; and to top it all off, there appears to be thievery afoot.Something is going to have to be done before the estate begins to crumble (quite literally, at this rate) but the question is what...? Delightfully witty and utterly charming this novel is for anyone today who has ever had, or contemplated...Having the Builders In.

Headline Review

Maximum City

Suketu Mehta
Authors:
Suketu Mehta

An international bestseller upon publication, MAXIMUM CITY was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and remains a classic study of the metropolis of Bombay. 'If there's been a more striking snapshot of the changing face of Asia, I've never read it' Sunday TimesBombay's story is told through the lives, often desperately near the edge, of some of the people who live there. Hitmen, dancing girls, cops, movie stars, poets, beggars and politicians - Suketu looked at the city through their eyes.The complex texture of these extraordinary tales is threaded together by Suketu Mehta's own history of growing up in Bombay and returning to live there after a 21-year absence, and in looking through the eyes of his found the city within himself.Part memoir, part journalism, part travelogue, and written with the relentless observation and patience of a novelist, Maximum City is a brilliantly illuminating portrait of Bombay and its people - a book as vast, diverse, and rich in experience, incident, and sensation as the city itself.

Tinder Press

Small Island: Winner of the 'best of the best' Orange Prize

Andrea Levy
Authors:
Andrea Levy

Small Island by bestselling author Andrea Levy won the Orange Prize for Fiction, as well as the Commonwealth Writers' Prize and the Whitbread. It is possibly the definitive fictional account of the experiences of the Empire Windrush generation. Now a major BBC drama starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Naomie Harris, its enduring appeal will captivate fans of Maya Angelou and Zadie Smith. 'A great read... honest, skilful, thoughtful and important' - GuardianIt is 1948, and England is recovering from a war. But at 21 Nevern Street, London, the conflict has only just begun. Queenie Bligh's neighbours do not approve when she agrees to take in Jamaican lodgers, but Queenie doesn't know when her husband will return, or if he will come back at all. What else can she do? Gilbert Joseph was one of the several thousand Jamaican men who joined the RAF to fight against Hitler. Returning to England as a civilian he finds himself treated very differently. It's desperation that makes him remember a wartime friendship with Queenie and knock at her door. Gilbert's wife Hortense, too, had longed to leave Jamaica and start a better life in England. But when she joins him she is shocked to find London shabby, decrepit, and far from the golden city of her dreams. Even Gilbert is not the man she thought he was...

Posted by Emily Barr, Author

Blog: Writing and Travelling by Emily Barr

One of the perks of writing books set in far-flung locations is the fact that I have to visit these places before I can write about them. Nobody ever accepts that these trips are ‘work’, and they are right. They are, in many ways, its opposite. Looking for places for a cast of imaginary people to have adventures is a bizarre pursuit. It involves finding out what it’s like to be somewhere: absorbing the sights, the sounds, the smells, buildings and food of a place. As it happens, this often involves spending time on a beach. All in a day’s work. It was travel that got me writing fiction. Fifteen years ago, I left a job at the Guardian and went away backpacking, more or less on the spur of the moment. It was one of the best years of my life. I had huge highs and terrible lows, but the moment I hit south east Asia I became obsessed with the idea of using it as a setting for a novel. I remember beginning to write a book, sitting on the beach at Palolem in Goa. I dug my toes into the hot sand and decided that I wanted an obnoxious main character, someone who would say exactly what she thought. If she was unbearable at the start of the book, then the experience of being out in the world on her own, forced to spend time alone, to talk to strangers, to fit into other ways of doing things, would change her. By the end of the novel I wanted her to be quite different. And her adventures would, of course, follow the same backpacking trail as my own. Those notes grew into Backpack, and eleven more novels have followed. Three of them, written when I was living in France and had small children, did not involve a trip away, but were set partly in France instead. For every other one I have packed a bag and set off, usually with a friend in tow, to find a place for my characters’ adventures. When I wrote The Perfect Lie, I caught an overnight train from Paris to Venice with my friend Sam and checked into the canalside hotel in which Don’t Look Now had been filmed (we only discovered that after booking: it was a fabulous extra detail, particularly since the place had clearly not been updated since the film was made in 1973). We spent six days wandering around Venice, jumping on and off boats, sitting at outdoor tables in bars sipping prosecco, and photographing and noting every detail. I would write every day, sitting on the hotel bed and staring out at the entrance to the Grand Canal that was outside the window. It was ‘work’, but it was also, of course, the opposite of work. It was time away from everyday life. It was the chance to plan a few days around lunch and dinner in interesting corners of the city, and to spend the time in between looking at frescoes in churches, standing on boats staring at implausibly picture-perfect views, and imagining interesting scenarios. Planning adventures for made-up people can be almost meditative: nothing is a better escape from real-life traumas. I go on these trips to scour the locations, but they also invariably kick-start my writing. The most obviously blissful research trip I’ve ever been on was the trip to Malaysia for Stranded. As the story largely takes place on a desert island, I needed to find a paradise beach in Asia and to spend time lying around on it – not something I was ever going to be able call ‘work’ with a straight face. My friend Vanessa and I hit upon Pulau Perhentian Kecil in Malaysia, booked up some accommodation, and set off. It took us a while to get there on various buses, taxis and boats, and there were plenty of mishaps along the way, but eventually we were stepping off a boat and into the clear shallow water of a sheltered bay. The sand was white, the tropical flowers huge and bright, and there was nothing to be seen but a few wooden huts, one of which was to be our home for the next few nights. ‘This,’ I thought, ‘will probably do.’ Then I tripped over one of the boat’s ropes and fell headfirst into the warm sea, which, while undignified, was not the worst thing that has ever happened. The days that followed were an amazing blast of writing in hammocks, reading on beaches, swimming in the sea and exploring the rainforest that forms the whole of the interior of the island. I came away with a book in my head, almost fully formed, and a notebook filled with ideas. In contrast to the paradise beach, this year I went to Svalbard, deep into the Arctic Circle, on my own. I had not been away alone since my very first travelling, my trip around the world. This trip, in late May, was difficult to sell to potential companions: ‘Come to the far North of the world! It will be freezing and snowy and incredibly remote’ is not, it turns out, as enticing a proposition as the one about the desert island beach. So I boarded a flight on my own, to Oslo, then Tromsø, then Longyearbyen, in Svalbard, an archipelago halfway between the north Norwegian coast and the North Pole. Norway is, of course, incredibly easy to navigate and extremely safe for a solo woman. Nonetheless, being alone again was very weird. Everything was so expensive that I existed on snacks. I didn’t speak to anyone. I stayed in the cheapest guesthouse in town, sharing a bathroom with a corridor full of hearty men in their twenties who all had explorers’ sledges piled up outside their doors with equipment for hearty expeditions. They said friendly hellos to me, but I was, essentially, on my own for five days. No conversation, no hot food, no alcohol: it was like a Buddhist retreat, but with midnight sun and snow. It was, again, one of the best times of my life. I kept waking up, all night long, to check that the sun was still shining outside my window (it was). I went on a day-long boat trip that was breathtaking and otherworldly, and that culminated with the sight of a mother polar bear leading her two cubs across the ice. I wandered into the world’s northernmost church just as a woman was using a fork-lift truck to remove boxes with ‘Arctic Philharmonic Orchestra’ stencilled onto them. Everywhere I looked I saw something stunning. I plotted out a whole story, incorporating everything around me. I have done the research: all that remains is the small matter of writing the book. Emily Barr's latest novel, the sensational The Sleeper, is out now in paperback.

Posted by Leah Woodburn, Editorial

Blog: A Taste of Christmas from our authors

Peace on earth and good will to men is all very well, but everyone knows what Christmas is really about: eating and drinking to excess. In preparation for the big day, we in the Headline office have been taking the task of expanding our stomachs very seriously and have spent the last few weeks limbering up with a steady intake of quality streets and mince pies, and maybe even a spot of sherry too.

CHAPTER SAMPLER

EBOOK OF THE MONTH

AN EXCLUSIVE EXTRACT FROM PAUL DOHERTY'S 100th NOVEL: In the final days of Henry VIII, one man is there to witness the demise of a legend... Master historian Paul Doherty weaves his magic in an epic tale of murderous schemes and a blood-smattered political order.

CHAPTER SAMPLER

ebook of the month

An exclusive extract featuring New York Times bestseller John Lescroart's most popular character, lawyer Dismas Hardy, in his most personal case so far.

THE HEIST

Our ebook of the month is THE HEIST, the first adventure in an electrifying new series from Janet Evanovich and Lee Goldberg.