Related to: 'Tasmina Perry'

Headline Review

The Pool House

Tasmina Perry
Authors:
Tasmina Perry

'Seductive and mysterious...the perfect novel to while away a summer's afternoon' Express on The House on Sunset Lake. The Hamptons is the beautiful, atmospheric setting for Sunday Times bestseller Tasmina Perry's stunning new novel about a woman who becomes fascinated by the story of a female resident who recently died in mysterious circumstances. Fans of the TV show The Affair will love this novel.

Headline Review

The House on Sunset Lake

Tasmina Perry
Authors:
Tasmina Perry
Headline Review

Career Girls

Louise Bagshawe
Authors:
Louise Bagshawe
Headline Review

The Last Kiss Goodbye

Tasmina Perry
Authors:
Tasmina Perry

A spellbinding tale of love, loss and long-buried secrets from the Sunday Times bestselling author. If you loved spending A Week in Paris with Rachel Hore or taking the Last Voyage of the Valentina with Santa Montefiore, you will adore this unforgettable novel.Everyone remembers their first kiss. But what about the last?1961. Journalist Rosamund Bailey is ready to change the world. When she meets explorer and man about town Dominic Blake, she realises she has found the love of her life. Just as happiness is in their grasp, the worst happens, and their future is snatched away.2014. Deep in the vaults of a museum, archivist Abby Morgan stumbles upon a breathtaking find. A faded photograph of a man saying goodbye to the woman he loves. Looking for a way to escape her own heartache, Abby becomes obsessed with the story, little realising that behind the image frozen in time lies a secret altogether more extraordinary.

Headline Review

The Proposal

Tasmina Perry
Authors:
Tasmina Perry
Headline Review

Deep Blue Sea

Tasmina Perry
Authors:
Tasmina Perry
Headline Review

Perfect Strangers

Tasmina Perry
Authors:
Tasmina Perry
Headline Review

Private Lives

Tasmina Perry
Authors:
Tasmina Perry
Headline Review

Tell Me Something

Adele Parks
Authors:
Adele Parks

When Elizabeth and her Italian husband Roberto decide to leave London for romantic Italy and his family business, Elizabeth hopes the change in lifestyle might help boost her chances of conceiving their longed for child. But the idyll shatters as her wily mother-in-law seems bent on destroying her marriage, and Roberto's beautiful, significant ex is a constant unwanted presence. Unwanted by Elizabeth, at least. Is Elizabeth's ferocious hunger for a baby enough to hold a marriage together or is it ripping it apart? And what about the gorgeous American stranger who's suddenly walked into her life?

Headline Review

About Last Night

Adele Parks
Authors:
Adele Parks

For thirty years, best friends Stephanie and Philippa have been practically inseparable. There's nothing they would not do for one another. Until a few simple words change everything.'I need you to say that I was with you.'Steph, eternally solid, considerate and dependable, is begging her best friend to lie to the police as she's desperately trying to conceal two shocking secrets to protect her family. Pip, self-consigned to the role of scatty, frivolous hot-head is overwhelmed; she's normally the one asking for help in a crisis although never anything as catastrophic as this. Both women have always believed that friendship is built on mutual selflessness, compromise and trust. Are those beliefs now to be tested beyond endurance?(P)2011 Headline Digital

Headline Review

Destiny

Louise Bagshawe
Authors:
Louise Bagshawe

Orphan Kate Fox is determined to make her mark in the world, and with her gorgeous looks, what better way to secure her future than to marry money? When she attracts the attention of media mogul Marcus Broder - sophisticated, powerful and wealthy beyond measure - it seems as though all of Kate's dreams have come true.But marriage to Marcus isn't everything she imagined. A closet filled with designer clothes, and nothing to do with her time but shop, lunch and be beautiful, does not bring happiness. Before long, Kate wants out of her marriage, a career of her own, and a chance at love. But Kate's reputation as a gold-digger is sealed. Ruthlessly pursued by Marcus, who will stop at nothing to destroy her, Kate knows she has to defeat her past if she is to win the trust of the man she loves.

Headline Review

Kiss Heaven Goodbye

Tasmina Perry
Authors:
Tasmina Perry
Headline Review

The Beautiful Game

Claire Challis And Fabulous
Authors:
Claire Challis And Fabulous
Author

Tasmina Perry - Biography

Tasmina Perry is the author of the huge Sunday Times Top Ten bestsellers Daddy's Girls, Gold Diggers, Guilty Pleasures, Original Sin, Kiss Heaven Goodbye, Private Lives and Perfect Strangers. She left a career in law to enter the world of women's magazine publishing, going on to win the New Magazine Journalist of the Year award, edit numerous national publications and write on celebrity and style for titles such as Elle and Glamour. In 2004 she launched her own travel and fashion magazine, Jaunt, and was Deputy Editor of InStyle magazine when she left the industry to write books full time. Her novels have been published in seventeen countries.

Headliners pick their favourite summer reads

Blog: Staff Hot Picks for Summer 2013

Deep Blue Sea - Tasmina Perry Summer is approaching, and luckily we can always rely on a good book to take us somewhere special. I’ve been reading Tasmina Perry’s Deep Blue Sea, which offers glittering escapism. Sitting reading in my flat in London, Deep Blue Sea magically transported me to exotic locations – by luxury sports car and first-class cabin, no less. When I found myself on a white beach in Thailand or in lush Montego Bay, I could almost feel the sun on my skin and the sand beneath my feet. Tasmina Perry also offers the reader a VIP pass into the arena of the super-rich, with unprecedented access to country mansions and London townhouses, phone-hacking scandals and expensive law suits. I was gripped by this rare glimpse into the world Deep Blue Sea inhabits - dark and dangerous beneath the bright lights and glamour, a world every bit as corrupt as it is chic. I also loved the smart, female characters – women who are independent, successful and opinionated, with high-flying careers or as strong, outstanding mothers. Rather than envied, I admired these women, as their personalities outshone their cashmere jumpers and designer bags. Part of these women’s charm is that they are flawed, and wholly believable. They embarrass themselves and you cringe with them; they make the wrong choices and you want to shake them and tell them to wake up. Like the relationships you have with your friends, you both admire and admonish them, and love every second of it. More than anything, Deep Blue Sea is a thrilling read. I was thrown headfirst into an irresistible web of deceit, infidelity and murder, as well as love, laughter, friendship and fun. And on one last note, who could argue with one of my favorite lines of all: ‘Cake is one of life’s great pleasures’? So sit down with a slice of cake, a cup of tea (or perhaps an iced margarita) and dive into Deep Blue Sea. Christina Demosthenous, Editorial The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls – Anton DiSclafani There are books that reach out to their readers in ways perhaps unexpected, perhaps unsettling, perhaps uninvited. For me, and I believe for most, these are the books I remember, that seem to become a part of my history in a way I cannot really describe to anyone who has never truly loved a book. The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls is one of those books. Anton DiSclafani gathers enormous themes of love, lust, coming of age and the complexity of inter-human relationships in such unassuming fashion that you barely notice the enormity of it all until the sizzling conclusion. Yonahlossee is about a teenage girl learning about herself and the people around her. This is both a challenge and a joy to read, particularly for those close to their siblings, for those baffled by their parents, for those who want too much, or who want anything at all. Darcy Nicholson, Editorial The Ocean at the End of the Lane – Neil Gaiman I have long been a Neil Gaiman fan and I’ve been so excited about The Ocean at the End of the Lane since I came to Headline. A beautiful fable of memories, magic and friendship, I don’t think anyone could read this and not be hit with a sense of nostalgia. Through a young man returning home and reminiscing on his childhood, we’re introduced to some amazing characters – most notably Lettie Hempstock (I wish I could have had a best friend as cool as her when I was 7!). As soon as I started this I was reminded of how wonderful it felt to be a child engrossed in books, full of innocence and occasionally being fearful of adults! Quite possibly Gaiman’s best novel yet. Deirdre O’Connell, Sales

Posted by Maura Brickell, Publicity

Blog: Let's Party Like It's 1986!

It is over a week since Headline’s 25th birthday party and the pink dust is beginning to settle, those high heel related wounds have healed and normal service has been well and truly restored at 338 Euston Road.

Beth Eynon

Roof Top Book Club: An evening of travel, food and award-winning authors...

‘One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.’ ― Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own Never were truer words said! And never was there a more delectable assortment of authors to discuss food and travel than bestsellers Tasmina Perry, Stella Newman and Jo Thomas at the inaugural Bookends Rooftop Book Club. After sipping champagne cocktails, (the answer to the question ‘Peach or raspberry bellini?’ always being ‘Yes’), I surveyed my surroundings. The roof terrace of Carmelite House, Hachette HQ, is mightily impressive. With views stretching from Tower Bridge, to the Shard, up to the London Eye and beyond, it was the perfect place for industry insiders and keen book fans alike to meet their favourite authors. With the room simmering with excitement, we gathered in front of the authors, budding writers keen to hear their writing secrets. For THE OYSTER CATCHER and her most recent novel, THE OLIVE BRANCH, Jo starts with place, digging into the particular delicacies of an area before trying to find her characters amongst them. Setting is so important to Jo that when she writes, she has to isolate herself in her car, although for her latest novel she upgraded to a campervan! Stella, meanwhile, creates her central heroic character and then draws the story around her. For THE DISH, she wanted a protagonist who was ‘feisty and sharp’; someone to clash with the macho swagger of the many male food critics writing today. However, Tasmina declared that we should be asking those around us about their lives, as ‘they have the most incredible stories’. Her latest bestseller, THE PROPOSAL, was inspired by a trip to a museum and a conversation with her aunt, rendered delightful by her gorgeous modern writing. As a book fanatic, events like these are the highlight of my calendar. I love the chance to connect with authors I love, and meet fellow bloggers and readers passionate about female authors and their writing. Where else could you learn that to research for THE DISH, Stella went to Paris for the day just to sample as many croissants as she could? Or that while travelling in Georgia, Tasmina found her dream home: the Savannah College of Art and Design? To end the evening, each author gave a one sentence pitch of their books. Read Jo’s THE OLIVE BRANCH if you want ‘the feeling of belonging if you are lost’. Check out Stella’s THE DISH if you like the sound of ‘emotional depth and lots of pastries’. And pre-order Tasmina’s THE LAST KISS GOODBYE as ‘Mum cried and said “This is your best one yet”… And mothers know best’. Up on the roof we were treated to a taste of intelligent female characters, heartbreaking secrets, and exotic locations. That certainly sounds like a potent recipe for a bestseller or three… Headline VIPs on the roof top! THE DISH and THE OLIVE BRANCH are available now from Headline Review. THE LAST KISS GOODBYE is on sale 10th September. The next Rooftop Book Club event is on 16th September, celebrating the 10th anniversary of Victoria Hislop’s THE ISLAND. Follow @RooftopBookClub and @TeamBookends for regular updates on all your favourite authors!

TOUCH AND GO

The Sunday Times top ten bestseller Lisa Gardner's latest thriller, TOUCH AND GO, is out now in paperback. Here's an exclusive look at chapter one to whet your appetite...

Posted by Myke Cole, author

Blog: Reflections on New York Comic Con

You might want to sit down for this one, it’s going to come as a bit of a shock. I hate to be the guy who pulls the rug out from under you, who shatters the tender illusion under which you’ve lived your entire life until now. The Internet didn’t always exist. No, I’m serious. There was a time when people didn’t have the means to communicate instantly, to answer nearly any question, to check in on the hilarious antics of anyone’s cat, at any time, anywhere in the world. It was a dark time. Marriages collapsed as the lack of Wikipedia meant that couples couldn’t resolve arguments with the click of a mouse. People starved to death, lost on unfamiliar roads, without their iPhone’s maps feature to guide them to civilization. Cats rode Roombas, dashed into paper bags, cuddled up beside dogs without anyone to witness their heart-breakingly cute hilarity. I’ve been called a tough guy because I’ve been to war, but I think the real testament to my durability was that I lived through this Dark Age. It was especially tough on nerds. We thrive on minutiae, esoteric cultural touchstones that are precious to us precisely because they are so rare. It’s hard to find a guy who can identify all the different types of Storm Trooper armor (and yes, that includes the Emperor’s Royal Guard) at a glance, who can tell you the THAC0 for a 3rd level Thief without having to look it up. When we meet those who can, we bond with them, reveling in a sense of cultural identity which I am assuming is the cousin to how Masai feel when they celebrate a warrior killing yet another lion. With a spear. By himself. Anyway, with no Internet, it was harder to find one another, especially when reaching out to the wrong person could get you mercilessly teased, or worse, smacked around and stuffed in a locker. To facilitate the location and bonding process, we nerds were drawn to gatherings known as “cons.” (And no, they didn’t involve tricking kindly old ladies out of their life savings). Generally held in hotels, these gatherings allowed a few hundred of us to bond in safety, reveling in our tribal songs (filking) and interpretive dances (LARPing). It also doubled as pretty much the only place on earth any of us would ever have a chance in hell of kissing a member of the opposite sex. I lived for cons. My life was one interminable stretch of time between them, each a crucible I had to get through until the next long weekend among my own. They all had cool names playing on their root word: Lunacon, Balticon, Confusion, Boskone. Okay, so that last one kind of fell down on the job, but you get the idea. They were always put on by fans, run by volunteers, usually operating at a loss. Science Fiction and Fantasy is one of the few genres where the majority of the pros come up through fandom, and cons were peppered liberally with authors, editors and literary agents, all doing their business networking in a morass of joy that gave them a uniform expression of I-can’t-believe-I-make-money-doing-this. It was at cons that my burgeoning interest in the genre became a professional ambition. I met my agent at Philcon, sat in the lobby until 3AM talking about everything other than writing. I first met my editor and her assistant at a con. Fast forward a-number-of-years-I-am-uncomortable-stating-because-I-am-really-really-old. A perfect storm of genre successes in popular culture (a string of outstanding superhero flicks, Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings movies, a surge in adult acceptance of video games, which are almost always SF/F based), and some literary successes (Harry Potter, Twilight, Eragon) helped propel Science Fiction and Fantasy into the mainstream. At the same time, the pervasiveness of the Internet began to erode the old fan-run con culture. When you can find thousands of like-minded people at the click of a mouse, why bother traveling hundreds of miles to spend a weekend at an expensive hotel? The shared vocabulary was online. Everything, from role-playing games to fan-fiction, was available in an instant. Those who accuse Internet addicts of isolation are fools. The Internet is a fundamentally social phenomenon. It is a new way that people form bonds. Cons began to gray. The panels became repetitive, the programming staff focusing more and more on holding on to their salad days, while the genre moved on without them. I don’t know when it first happened, but somewhere along the way, someone perked up and noticed that the con culture was still being applied to a small subsection of society, but revolved around a genre that was now immensely popular. The appeal was broad enough that people were willing to spend a lot of money for their articles of faith: action figures, specialized t-shirts, special edition DVDs, oceans and oceans of books. Boom. The for-profit con was born. There are comic cons all over the country now. It seems like every major city has one. While the old fan-run cons attract hundreds, these pull in tens of thousands, packing the largest venues of major cities so full that it takes an attendee 20 minutes to walk 20 feet. They transcend genre now, have become pop culture celebrations, pulling in film, television and gaming executives hawking wares from straight comedy to mainstream drama, with nary a superhero in sight. And there’s still more money to be made, with venue after venue springing up to meet demand. Wizard World, Dragon Con, the Sci-Fi Weekender. There’s a tribal petulance for those of us who were there first, who saw the birth of the con and grew up in the bosom of its larval state. This new age of mega cons makes us want to shake our fists and call the beautiful people thronging the halls of the Javitts Center Johnny-Come-Latelys (and if one more model unilaterally declares herself “Queen of the Nerds,” I will go ballistic). They are, after all, the people who took our lunch money, who wouldn’t date us. Walk through Williamsburg, Brooklyn and you’re bound to see a guy who has never played D&D in his life sporting a “THIS IS HOW I ROLL” T-shirt, emblazoned with a 20-sided die. But we go, of course. Comic Con is a focal point of my year, the happiest long weekend of the annual cycle. And that’s because I remembered something from my early days as a writer. When my best friend hit it huge as a professional genre writer before I did, I made the conscious decision not to be jealous. A rising tide lifts all boats, I told myself, and it was true. His success didn’t hinder mine in the least. In fact, it helped me when my turn came. The same is true here. I was drawn to cons of hundreds for the same reason folks are drawn to cons of hundreds of thousands: Because the genre is amazing, because a thing shared is so much more wonderful than a thing enjoyed privately. Because nothing in life can beat the simple animal pleasure of turning to a stranger and saying “That is so awesome!” and having them smile knowingly and say “it really is!” It is a brief moment where we are not alone. As I walk through New York Comic Con (or rather, as I ride the shoulders of my enormous colleague Sam Sykes to avoid getting trampled by the horde), I see the legions of fans thronging the aisles. In junior high school, most of these people likely wouldn’t have been my friends. But they are now. A rising tide lifts all boats. Man, it just keeps going up and up, year after year. And the view from here is glorious.