Related to: 'Louise Brown'

Wildfire

Great Expectations

Eddie Izzard
Authors:
Eddie Izzard
Headline Review

The Key

Kathryn Hughes
Authors:
Kathryn Hughes

'A heartbreakingly powerful read' The Sun on The Key 'You will be thinking of this book long after you've finished it' A reader on The Key From the #1 bestselling author of the international phenomenon The Letter, Kathryn Hughes, comes The Key, an unforgettable story of a heartbreaking secret that will stay with you for ever.'A wonderful, enthralling story; one that I didn't want to end' Lesley Pearse on The Key 'Oh wow! This story broke my heart then filled it with joy then broke it all over again! I adored The Letter and The Secret but this I have to say was my favourite. Heartfelt and poignant an absolute joy' A reader on The KeyTurn The Key and unlock the past...1956 It's Ellen Crosby's first day as a student nurse at Ambergate Hospital. When she meets a young woman admitted by her father, little does Ellen know that a choice she will make is to change both their lives for ever...2006Sarah is drawn to the now abandoned Ambergate. Whilst exploring the old corridors she discovers a suitcase belonging to a female patient who entered Ambergate fifty years earlier. The shocking contents, untouched for half a century, will lead Sarah to unravel a forgotten story of tragedy and lost love, and the chance to make an old wrong right . . .It's time to discover what a million readers already know. No one grips your heart like Kathryn Hughes . . .'You will find it hard to put down. I cried buckets of tears reading it''A beautifully told, tragic tale . . . restoring your faith in the kindness of strangers and the strength of the human spirit''From start to finish, a lovely, sometimes heartbreaking read''A sheer joy to read . . . Wonderfully romantic with beautiful characters''I have finished this book with tears in my eyes but a smile on my face''I couldn't put it down. So beautifully written. I feel like I'm a better person for reading it' 'I cried with this book - it tugged at the heart all the way through' 'This must be one of the best books I have ever read'

Headline Review

The Image of You

Adele Parks
Authors:
Adele Parks

The Image of You is the utterly gripping new novel from Adele Parks, author of the No. 1 bestselling ebook, The Stranger In My Home. This story of families, love, deception and secrets is perfect for fans of TV's Doctor Foster, Liar, The Replacement, Liane Moriarty's Big Little Lies and Shari Lapena. 'Brilliant storyline, great characters, very clever, loved it!' B A Paris'Addictive and perceptive' Lucy Atkins'A compelling and gripping story of secrets and lies' Daily ExpressCan you ever trust someone you meet online?Anna and Zoe are twins. Identical in appearance, utterly different in personality, they share a bond so close that nothing - or no one - can rip them apart.Until Anna meets charismatic Nick.Anna is trusting, romantic and hopeful; she thinks Nick is perfect.Zoe is daring, dangerous and extreme; she thinks Nick is a liar.Zoe has seen Anna betrayed by men before. She'll stop at nothing to discover if Nick is as good as he seems. Lies may hurt. But honesty can kill.

Headline Review

The Himalayan Summer

Louise Brown
Authors:
Louise Brown

THE HIMALAYAN SUMMER is a spellbinding novel of the British Raj period, the quest to find a child, and a love story beyond boundaries - for all fans of THE TEA PLANTER'S WIFE and of Louise Brown's earlier novel, EDEN GARDENS.'Beautifully written, you can smell the spices, feel the heat, and your heart will break. You will laugh, cry and you will want a sequel' Lovereading.comEllie Jeffreys arrives in Darjeeling with her British husband, en route to Kathmandu. They have ten-month-old, golden-haired twins, and despite appearing to be a happy family, Ellie's relationship with the overbearing, philandering Francis is disintegrating. At a cocktail party, Ellie meets Hugh Douglas, a maverick explorer and botanist. Despite the rumours surrounding Hugh,Ellie is drawn to him. A year later, Nepal is devastated by a catastrophic earthquake and in a falling building, Ellie is forced to make an instant, and terrible, decision: she has time to save only one of her children. When she returns for her son's body the next day, it has gone. Ellie knows he cannot have disappeared; someone, somewhere has her child, and it is to Hugh that she turns for help.

Headline Review

The Stranger In My Home: I thought she was my daughter. I was wrong.

Adele Parks
Authors:
Adele Parks

The Stranger In My Home is the utterly compelling new contemporary novel from Adele Parks, Sunday Times bestselling author of The State We're In, sure to move, grip and delight her fans along with readers of Liane Moriarty, Jane Shemilt and Lisa Jewell. When you have everything you dreamed of, there is everything to lose.Alison is lucky and she knows it. She has the life she always craved, including a happy home with Jeff and their brilliant, vivacious teenage daughter, Katherine - the absolute centre of Alison's world.Then a knock at the door ends life as they know it.Fifteen years ago, someone else took Alison's baby from the hospital. And now Alison is facing the unthinkable.Her daughter belongs to someone else.What would you do if you discovered your beloved child is not yours?(P)2016 Headline Digital

Headline Review

The Secret

Kathryn Hughes
Authors:
Kathryn Hughes

'Riveting' Lesley Pearse on The Letter. 'Gripping' Good Housekeeping on The Secret. From the #1 bestselling author of The Letter comes The Secret - a powerful, twisting novel that you won't be able to put down. Mary has been nursing a secret. Forty years ago, she made a choice that would change her world for ever, and alter the path of someone she holds dear.Beth is searching for answers. She has never known the truth about her parentage, but finding out could be the lifeline her sick child so desperately needs. When Beth finds a faded newspaper cutting amongst her mother's things, she realises the key to her son's future lies in her own past. She must go back to where it all began to unlock...The Secret.What readers are saying about the unputdownable stories of Kathryn Hughes:'Get set to be hooked' 'A page-turner from the very beginning''This is one of the BEST BOOKS I have ever read''I cried buckets of tears reading it''A beautifully told, tragic tale'

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After Alice

Gregory Maguire
Authors:
Gregory Maguire
Headline Review

Eden Gardens

Louise Brown
Authors:
Louise Brown

Eden Gardens, Calcutta, the 1940s. In a ramshackle house, streets away from the grand colonial mansions of the British, live Maisy, her Mam and their ayah, Pushpa. Whiskey-fuelled and poverty-stricken, Mam entertains officers in the night - a disgrace to British India. All hopes are on beautiful Maisy to restore their good fortune.But Maisy's more at home in the city's forbidden alleyways, eating bazaar food and speaking Bengali with Pushpa, than dancing in glittering ballrooms with potential husbands.Then one day Maisy's tutor falls ill. His son stands in. Poetic, handsome and ambitious for an independent India, Sunil Banerjee promises Maisy the world.So begins a love affair that will cast her future, for better and for worse. Just as the Second World War strikes and the empire begins to crumble...This is the other side of British India. A dizzying, scandalous, dangerous world, where race, class and gender divide and rule.

Tinder Press

The Other Side of the World

Stephanie Bishop
Authors:
Stephanie Bishop

Headline Review

The Letter

Kathryn Hughes
Authors:
Kathryn Hughes

KATHRYN HUGHES' MAGNIFICENT NEW NOVEL THE KEY IS AVAILABLE NOWTHE #1 EBOOK BESTSELLER. NOW WITH OVER 3000 5* REVIEWS.Every so often a love story comes along to remind us that sometimes, in our darkest hour, hope shines a candle to light our way. Discover THE LETTER by Kathryn Hughes, the Number One bestseller that has captured thousands of hearts worldwide. Perfect for fans of The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks. 'A wonderful, uplifting story' Lesley PearseTina Craig longs to escape her violent husband. She works all the hours God sends to save up enough money to leave him, also volunteering in a charity shop to avoid her unhappy home. Whilst going through the pockets of a second-hand suit, she comes across an old letter, the envelope firmly sealed and unfranked. Tina opens the letter and reads it - a decision that will alter the course of her life for ever...Billy Stirling knows he has been a fool, but hopes he can put things right. On 4th September 1939 he sits down to write the letter he hopes will change his future. It does - in more ways than he can ever imagine...The Letter tells the story of two women, born decades apart, whose paths are destined to cross and how one woman's devastation leads to the other's salvation.

Tinder Press

The Good Children

Roopa Farooki
Authors:
Roopa Farooki

'Few novels are life-changing; this one just might be' Daily MailLeaving home is one thing. Surviving is another.1940s Lahore, the Punjab. Two brothers and their two younger sisters are brought up to be 'good children', who do what they're told. Beaten and browbeaten by their manipulative mother, to study, honour and obey. Sully, damaged and brilliant, Jakie, irreverent and passionate. Cynical Mae and soft-hearted Lana, outshone and too easily dismissed.The boys escape their repressive home to study medicine abroad, abandoning their sisters to their mother and marriages. Sully falls in love with an unsuitable Indian girl in the States; Jakie with an unsuitable white man in London. Their sisters in Pakistan refuse to remain trophy wives, and disgrace the family while they strike out to build their own lives. As they raise their own families, and return to bury the dead, Sully and Jakie, Mae and Lana, face the consequences of their decisions, and learn that leaving home doesn't mean it will ever leave them.THE GOOD CHILDREN is a compelling story of discipline and disobedience, punishment and the pursuit of passion, following the children of a game-changing generation and the ties that bind them across cultures, continents and decades. Painful and sweet, tough and surprising, it is a landmark epic of the South Asian immigrant experience.

Tinder Press

The Good Children

Roopa Farooki
Authors:
Roopa Farooki
Headline

The Flying Man

Roopa Farooki
Authors:
Roopa Farooki

Meet Maqil - also known as Mike, Mehmet, Mikhail and Miguel - a chancer and charlatan. A criminally clever man who tells a good tale, trading on his charm and good looks, reinventing himself with a new identity and nationality in each successive country he makes his home, abandoning wives and children and careers in the process. He's a compulsive gambler - driven to lose at least as much as he gains, in games of chance, and in life. A damaged man in search of himself. From the day he was delivered in Lahore, Pakistan, alongside his stillborn twin, he proved he was a born survivor. He has been a master of flying escapes, from Cairo to Paris, from London to Hong Kong, humbled by love, outliving his peers, and ending up old and alone in a budget hotel in Biarritz some eighty years later. His chequered history is catching up with him: his tracks have been uncovered and his latest wife, his children, his creditors and former business associates, all want to pin him down. But even at the end, Maqil just can't resist trying it on; he's still playing his game, and the game won't be over until it's been won.

Headline Review

The Price of Glory

Seth Hunter
Authors:
Seth Hunter

1795: Young warriors Nelson and Napoleon learn the art of war and the cost of fame . . .The third novel in this epic, thrilling series of war and villainy on the high seas, featuring Captain Nathan Peake. Seth Hunter's brilliant series will enthral fans of Dudley Pope and Patrick O'Brian. 'Another slick nautical adventure in the Patrick O'Brian tradition . . . rousing naval battles, twisty plot, and muscular prose' Publishers Weekly on THE TIDE OF WARNathan Peake charts a perilous course through the treacherous seas off Brittany and into the even more dangerous waters of post-Revolutionary Paris. There he encounters two of the most beautiful and scandalous courtesans in history - and their little toy soldier, laughingly dubbed Captain Cannon, who is about to win enduring fame as Napoleon Bonaparte.Returned to the command of the frigate Unicorn, Nathan is sent to join another young glory-seeker, Captain Horatio Nelson, in a bid to wreck Bonaparte's plans for the invasion of Italy. But Nathan has his own private agenda - to find his lost love amid the chaos of war - and as the fighting spreads from the mountains to the sea, he discovers that glory comes at a higher price than all the gold in the vaults of Genoa.What readers are saying about THE PRICE OF GLORY:'Seth Hunter is a natural storyteller and a master of description, whether it be wild seas, ship to ship battles, dangerous political intrigue or the natural beauty of the countryside when Nathan Peake is ashore. Totally absorbing' 'A really fantastic read and immaculately researched''[Seth Hunter's] is a natural storyteller and his prose is beautifully elegant. There's wit, adventure, big seas, monumental battles, and even a moving love story. A delight'

Tinder Press

The Secret Life of Bees

Sue Monk Kidd
Authors:
Sue Monk Kidd

The multi-million-copy-bestselling novel about a young girl's journey towards healing and the transforming power of love, from the award-winning author of The Invention of Wings. Set in South Carolina in 1964, The Secret Life of Bees tells the story of Lily Owens, whose life has been shaped around the blurred memory of the afternoon her mother was killed. When Lily's fierce-hearted black 'stand-in mother', Rosaleen, insults three of the deepest racists in town, Lily decides to spring them both free. They escape to Tiburon, South Carolina - a town that holds the secret to her mother's past. Taken in by an eccentric trio of black beekeeping sisters, Lily is introduced to their mesmerizing world of bees and honey. And there Lily starts a journey as much about her understanding of the world as about the mystery surrounding her mother. 'A wonderful book, by turns sad, full of incident and shot through with grown-up magic reminiscent of Joanne Harris' Daily Telegraph'Charming, funny, moving' The Times'Wonderfully written, powerful, poignant...read it' Joanna TrollopeWhat readers are saying about The Secret Life of Bees:'One of the most poignant and heart tugging books I have ever read' Amazon reviewer, 5 stars'Emotional and heart-breaking, yet full of hope and love. I laughed and cried equally through the book. This wonderful book will stay with me for a long time to come' Amazon reviewer, 5 stars'One of the best books I've read in a while. Touching, well-written, beautiful, full of expression, insightful' Goodreads reviewer, 5 stars 'A beautifully written masterpiece. I loved the writing, the descriptions, the humour sprinkled through the story. There was sadness and love, hope and forgiveness. I highly recommend this book' Goodreads reviewer, 5 stars

Headline Review

The Paradise Trail

Duncan Campbell
Authors:
Duncan Campbell
Headline Review

Maximum City

Suketu Mehta
Authors:
Suketu Mehta

Roopa Farooki

Roopa Farooki was born in Lahore in Pakistan and brought up in London. She graduated from New College, Oxford and worked in advertising before turning to write fiction. Roopa now lives in south-east England and south-west France with her husband, twin girls and two sons. Bitter Sweets, her first novel, was nominated for the Orange Award for New Writers 2007. Roopa's novels have been published internationally and translated into a dozen languages.

Kathryn Hughes

Kathryn Hughes was born in Altrincham, near Manchester. After completing a secretarial course, Kathryn met her husband and they married in Canada. For twenty-nine years they ran a business together, raised two children and travelled when they could to places such as India, Singapore, South Africa and New Zealand. Kathryn and her family now make their home in a village near Manchester. The Letter, Kathryn's first novel, was a digital #1 and international bestseller, and her second novel The Secret has been highly acclaimed. The Key is Kathryn Hughes' third novel.

Posted by Emily Barr, Author

Blog: Writing and Travelling by Emily Barr

One of the perks of writing books set in far-flung locations is the fact that I have to visit these places before I can write about them. Nobody ever accepts that these trips are ‘work’, and they are right. They are, in many ways, its opposite. Looking for places for a cast of imaginary people to have adventures is a bizarre pursuit. It involves finding out what it’s like to be somewhere: absorbing the sights, the sounds, the smells, buildings and food of a place. As it happens, this often involves spending time on a beach. All in a day’s work. It was travel that got me writing fiction. Fifteen years ago, I left a job at the Guardian and went away backpacking, more or less on the spur of the moment. It was one of the best years of my life. I had huge highs and terrible lows, but the moment I hit south east Asia I became obsessed with the idea of using it as a setting for a novel. I remember beginning to write a book, sitting on the beach at Palolem in Goa. I dug my toes into the hot sand and decided that I wanted an obnoxious main character, someone who would say exactly what she thought. If she was unbearable at the start of the book, then the experience of being out in the world on her own, forced to spend time alone, to talk to strangers, to fit into other ways of doing things, would change her. By the end of the novel I wanted her to be quite different. And her adventures would, of course, follow the same backpacking trail as my own. Those notes grew into Backpack, and eleven more novels have followed. Three of them, written when I was living in France and had small children, did not involve a trip away, but were set partly in France instead. For every other one I have packed a bag and set off, usually with a friend in tow, to find a place for my characters’ adventures. When I wrote The Perfect Lie, I caught an overnight train from Paris to Venice with my friend Sam and checked into the canalside hotel in which Don’t Look Now had been filmed (we only discovered that after booking: it was a fabulous extra detail, particularly since the place had clearly not been updated since the film was made in 1973). We spent six days wandering around Venice, jumping on and off boats, sitting at outdoor tables in bars sipping prosecco, and photographing and noting every detail. I would write every day, sitting on the hotel bed and staring out at the entrance to the Grand Canal that was outside the window. It was ‘work’, but it was also, of course, the opposite of work. It was time away from everyday life. It was the chance to plan a few days around lunch and dinner in interesting corners of the city, and to spend the time in between looking at frescoes in churches, standing on boats staring at implausibly picture-perfect views, and imagining interesting scenarios. Planning adventures for made-up people can be almost meditative: nothing is a better escape from real-life traumas. I go on these trips to scour the locations, but they also invariably kick-start my writing. The most obviously blissful research trip I’ve ever been on was the trip to Malaysia for Stranded. As the story largely takes place on a desert island, I needed to find a paradise beach in Asia and to spend time lying around on it – not something I was ever going to be able call ‘work’ with a straight face. My friend Vanessa and I hit upon Pulau Perhentian Kecil in Malaysia, booked up some accommodation, and set off. It took us a while to get there on various buses, taxis and boats, and there were plenty of mishaps along the way, but eventually we were stepping off a boat and into the clear shallow water of a sheltered bay. The sand was white, the tropical flowers huge and bright, and there was nothing to be seen but a few wooden huts, one of which was to be our home for the next few nights. ‘This,’ I thought, ‘will probably do.’ Then I tripped over one of the boat’s ropes and fell headfirst into the warm sea, which, while undignified, was not the worst thing that has ever happened. The days that followed were an amazing blast of writing in hammocks, reading on beaches, swimming in the sea and exploring the rainforest that forms the whole of the interior of the island. I came away with a book in my head, almost fully formed, and a notebook filled with ideas. In contrast to the paradise beach, this year I went to Svalbard, deep into the Arctic Circle, on my own. I had not been away alone since my very first travelling, my trip around the world. This trip, in late May, was difficult to sell to potential companions: ‘Come to the far North of the world! It will be freezing and snowy and incredibly remote’ is not, it turns out, as enticing a proposition as the one about the desert island beach. So I boarded a flight on my own, to Oslo, then Tromsø, then Longyearbyen, in Svalbard, an archipelago halfway between the north Norwegian coast and the North Pole. Norway is, of course, incredibly easy to navigate and extremely safe for a solo woman. Nonetheless, being alone again was very weird. Everything was so expensive that I existed on snacks. I didn’t speak to anyone. I stayed in the cheapest guesthouse in town, sharing a bathroom with a corridor full of hearty men in their twenties who all had explorers’ sledges piled up outside their doors with equipment for hearty expeditions. They said friendly hellos to me, but I was, essentially, on my own for five days. No conversation, no hot food, no alcohol: it was like a Buddhist retreat, but with midnight sun and snow. It was, again, one of the best times of my life. I kept waking up, all night long, to check that the sun was still shining outside my window (it was). I went on a day-long boat trip that was breathtaking and otherworldly, and that culminated with the sight of a mother polar bear leading her two cubs across the ice. I wandered into the world’s northernmost church just as a woman was using a fork-lift truck to remove boxes with ‘Arctic Philharmonic Orchestra’ stencilled onto them. Everywhere I looked I saw something stunning. I plotted out a whole story, incorporating everything around me. I have done the research: all that remains is the small matter of writing the book. Emily Barr's latest novel, the sensational The Sleeper, is out now in paperback.