Related to: 'Claire McGowan'

Headline

The Girl I Used To Be

Mary Torjussen
Authors:
Mary Torjussen

YOU DON'T REMEMBER. HE WON'T LET YOU FORGET.'A teasing, suspenseful, and twisty read!' Shari Lapena, THE COUPLE NEXT DOORThe second compelling psychological thriller from Mary Torjussen. Completely gripping and full of page-turning twists, this is perfect for fans of Laura Marshall's FRIEND REQUEST and K.L. Slater's LIAR. 'Paula Hawkins fans will find a lot to like' Publishers WeeklyHow can you hide your mistakes when you don't know what they are?Gemma Brogan needs a break from her life.A work event looks the ideal chance to get away. And a friendly new client seems like the perfect gentleman when he joins Gemma for an innocent dinner . . . But the next morning she has no memory of how the night ended and he has vanished into thin air. Suddenly, Gemma is plunged into a twisted nightmare she can't control. To protect her future, and her family, she will have to confront shocking secrets from her past - and the truth about the girl she used to be.WHAT READERS ARE SAYING:'What a fantastically twisty psychological thriller!' Goodreads Reviewer, 5 stars'The Girl I Used To Be is a brilliant read, addicting, fast-paced, and unputdownable' Goodreads Reviewer, 5 stars'Mary Torjussen has put together the perfect balance between chilling and thrilling' Goodreads Reviewer, 5 starsPRAISE FOR MARY TORJUSSEN:'A page turner with a cracking ending' Jenny Blackhurst, THE FOSTER CHILD'This fast-paced story kept me guessing - great twist at the end' K.L. Slater, LIAR and BLINK'A twist that will knock your socks off' Gillian McAllister, ANYTHING YOU DO SAY'A page turner with a cracking ending' Jenny Blackhurst, THE FOSTER CHILD

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The Killing House (Paula Maguire 6)

Claire McGowan
Authors:
Claire McGowan

Long-buried secrets are being unearthed. And they're very close to home...Forensic psychologist Paula Maguire returns yet again to her hometown to investigate a spine-chilling case in THE KILLING HOUSE, the sixth novel in Claire McGowan's series. The Paula Maguire series is the perfect read for fans of Michael Connelly and Peter May.'A delicious spookiness is added to McGowan's customary mix of complex characterisation and sweat-inducing excitement, offering a new level of chilling thrills' - Sunday Mirror When a puzzling missing persons' case opens up in her hometown, forensic psychologist Paula Maguire can't help but return once more.Renovations at an abandoned farm have uncovered two bodies: a man known to be an IRA member missing since the nineties, and a young girl whose identity remains a mystery.As Paula attempts to discover who the girl is and why no one is looking for her, an anonymous tip-off claims that her own long-lost mother is also buried on the farm.When another girl is kidnapped, Paula must find the person responsible before more lives are destroyed. But there are explosive secrets still to surface. And even Paula can't predict that the investigation will strike at the heart of all she holds dear.What readers are saying about the Paula Maguire series:'I have loved every single book. It's the characters and their own personal lives that really stand out in Claire McGowan's novels''Claire McGowan knows how to pull us in. Her future releases are always lined up on my kindle way ahead of time!''McGowan keeps developing her characters to be more rounded and complex. I've really fallen in love with the character of Paula Maguire and I can't wait to read more about her'

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Blood Tide (Paula Maguire 5)

Claire McGowan
Authors:
Claire McGowan
Headline

A Savage Hunger (Paula Maguire 4)

Claire McGowan
Authors:
Claire McGowan
Headline Eternal

Every Move She Makes: Who's Watching Now 1 (A novel of thrilling suspense)

Jannine Gallant
Authors:
Jannine Gallant

Fans of Karen Rose, Cynthia Eden, Kaylea Cross and Pamela Clare will love Jannine Gallant's brilliant blend of exciting suspense and emotional romance, with real characters caught in extraordinary circumstances. No matter where she goes, he knows her every move... Long ago, Rachel Carpenter was a glamorous soap star. She gave it all up to move to Napa Valley with her daughters to open up a bookstore near her family vineyard. Her life is safe and dependable, until she encounters Kane Lafferty at a wilderness camp in the rugged High Sierra. A burned-out police detective struggling with his own demons, Kane is instantly attracted to Rachel. And like Rachel, he isn't sure if he's ready to open up his heart. But everything is about to change... Someone is watching from the darkness. A fanatic obsessed with Rachel for years has decided to claim what he believes is his. It will be up to Kane to not only protect his new love and her family, but to uncover the identity of the stalker before it's too late for all of them...Looking for more danger and drama? Don't miss the other Who's Watching Now titles, Every Step She Takes and Every Vow She Breaks.

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The Silent Dead (Paula Maguire 3)

Claire McGowan
Authors:
Claire McGowan

The third in the crime series featuring forensic psychologist Paula Maguire by Claire McGowan acclaimed as 'Ireland's answer to Ruth Rendell' by Ken Bruen.Victim: Male. Mid-thirties. 5'7".Cause of death: Hanging. Initial impression - murder.ID: Mickey Doyle. Suspected terrorist and member of the Mayday Five.The officers at the crime scene know exactly who the victim is.Doyle was one of five suspected bombers who caused the deaths of sixteen people. The remaining four are also missing and when a second body is found, decapitated, it's clear they are being killed by the same methods their victims suffered. Forensic psychologist Paula Maguire is assigned the case but she is up against the clock - both personally and professionally. With moral boundaries blurred between victim and perpetrator, will be Paula be able to find those responsible? After all, even killers deserve justice, don't they?

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Controlled Explosions (A Paula Maguire Short Story)

Claire McGowan
Authors:
Claire McGowan
Headline

The Dead Ground (Paula Maguire 2)

Claire McGowan
Authors:
Claire McGowan

A stolen baby. A murdered woman. A decades-old atrocity. Something connects them all... A month before Christmas, and Ballyterrin on the Irish border lies under a thick pall of snow. When a newborn baby goes missing from hospital, it's all too close to home for forensic psychologist Paula Maguire, who's wrestling with the hardest decision of her life.Then a woman is found in a stone circle with her stomach cut open and it's clear a brutal killer is on the loose.As another child is taken and a pregnant woman goes missing, Paula is caught up in the hunt for a killer no one can trace, who will stop at nothing to get what they want.The Dead Ground will leave you gasping for breath as Paula discovers every decision she makes really is a matter of life and death...(P)2014 Headline Digital

Headline

Mohammed Maguire

Bateman
Authors:
Bateman

When the Marines destroy a terrorist training camp in the Libyan desert, they also kill both the parents of a ten-year-old boy, Mohammed Maguire.Brought back to Ireland, the land of his mother's birth, young Mohammed is treated as a public relations commodity by both sides of an argument that he doesn't understand - but which he can see with the clear eyes of a child.Wickedly funny and wonderfully abrasive, MOHAMMED MAGUIRE is Bateman at his very best.

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The Lost (Paula Maguire 1)

Claire McGowan
Authors:
Claire McGowan
Headline

The Fall: A murder brings them together. The truth will tear them apart.

Claire McGowan
Authors:
Claire McGowan

What would you do if the man you love was accused of murder?Bad things never happen to Charlotte. She's living the life she's always wanted and about to marry wealthy banker, Dan. But Dan's been hiding a secret, and the pressure is pushing him over the edge. After he's arrested for the vicious killing of a nightclub owner, Charlotte's future is shattered.Then she opens her door to Keisha, an angry and frustrated stranger with a story to tell. Convinced of Dan's innocence, Charlotte must fight for him - even if it means destroying her perfect life. But what Keisha knows threatens everyone she loves, and puts her own life in danger.DC Matthew Hegarty is riding high on the success of Dan's arrest. But he's finding it difficult to ignore his growing doubts as well as the beautiful and vulnerable Charlotte. Can he really risk it all for what's right?Three stories. One truth. They all need to brace themselves for the fall.(P)2012 Headline Digital

Headline Review

Mirror Mirror

Gregory Maguire
Authors:
Gregory Maguire
Headline

The Killings at Badger's Drift

Caroline Graham
Authors:
Caroline Graham

'Simply the best detective writer since Agatha Christie' The Sunday TimesA book that will glue you from beginning to end. If you love Agatha Christie, you'll adore Caroline Graham, with characters who charm and murderers who terrorise. Named by the CWAs as one of 'The Top 100 Crime Novels of All Time', The Killings at Badger's Drift is the first spectacular novel in the Midsomer Murders series, the novel that inspired the ITV hit drama, now featuring an exclusive foreword by John Nettles who played best-loved TV detective and star of Midsomer Murders, DCI Tom Barnaby.The village of Badger's Drift is the essence of tranquillity. But when resident and well-loved spinster Miss Simpson takes a stroll in the nearby woods, she stumbles across something she was never meant to see, and there's only one way to keep her quiet.Miss Simpson's death is not suspicious, say the villagers. But Miss Lucy Bellringer refuses to rest: her friend has been murdered. She is sure of it.She calls on Detective Chief Inspector Barnaby to investigate, and it isn't long until the previously unseen seamy side of Badger's Drift is brought to light. But as old rivalries, past loves and new scandals surface, the next murder is not far away. Praise for Caroline Graham's novels:'One to savour' Val McDermid 'A mystery of which Agatha Christie would have been proud. . . A beautifully written crime novel' The Times'Tension builds, bitchery flares, resentment seethes . . . lots of atmosphere' Mail on Sunday'A witty, well-plotted, absolute joy of a book' Yorkshire Post 'Swift, tense and highly alarming' TLS 'Lots of excellent character sketches . . . and the dialogue is lively and convincing' Independent 'Read her and you'll be astonished . . . very sexy, very hip and very funny' Scotsman

Headline

A Ghost in the Machine

Caroline Graham
Authors:
Caroline Graham
Posted by Claire McGowan

Writing Spaces: Putting Real-Life Events into Fiction

As part of Headline’s Writing Spaces feature, Claire McGowan tells us about putting real-life events into fiction.

THE DEAD GROUND

THE DEAD GROUND is the latest chilling thriller from the brilliant Claire McGowan, author of THE LOST. Featuring the forensic psychologist Paula Maguire, this isn't one for the faint-hearted, as this gripping extract shows..

By Clemency Burton-Hill

New York, New York

Being a freelance writer has its upsides and its down; but an indisputable up is the ability to choose one’s office daily. As I write, I am sitting in a small café on Hudson and Charles, spotted on a whim as I crossed over the street from Seventh Avenue. It boasts walls of exposed old brick and studiedly shabby wooden furniture; a vinyl record of jazz turns on a gramophone in the corner. October sunlight slants lazily across the street and slinks in through the café windows, gilding a wall of analogue photographs depicting the proprietor’s great-grandparents in curling sepia. It is late 2012; the New York headquarters of some of the twenty-first-century’s most cutting-edge technology companies are in the vicinity; but with this chipped mug of coffee in my hands here and that Charlie Parker LP spinning there, I could be occupying the sort of contemplative corner spot that any number of human characters in New York may have occupied before me. Other years, other faces, other times. People sometimes complain that Greenwich Village, like much in Manhattan, has “altered beyond recognition” and I’m sure in many ways it has – it is in the very nature of this town; the very name of this town, to enshrine the possibility of change. But I also know, I feel intuitively, that there is still in these streets the unwavering spirit of the old city, catering generously and eternally to the needs of those whose hearts are open, curious and yearning. There’s no place like this on earth. In other words, New York’s still got it. **** When I turned eighteen, I was given a subscription to the New Yorker for my birthday. A decade later, almost to the day, I moved to Manhattan and for the first few months I lived here, the simplest and most wondrous of the inestimable gifts this city bestows seemed to be this: that I could open those storied pages, flip to Goings On About Town, and, if I so desired, “go on about town”. I could read about a jazz gig, a book reading, a film opening, a symphony or rock concert, an opera, a play, a new restaurant and, bank balance permitting, experience it that same night. Back in my hometown of London – itself a city not without wonder – reading the Goings On section of the New Yorker became a weekly act of masochism, yielding predictable twists of almost palpable longing. To read about what was happening that same night across the Atlantic; to dream, to imagine, but to only be able to imagine – to not be in New York was sometimes too much to bear. Yet this is a city that has always been created by the imagination; a metropolis lovingly constructed in ink and paper and celluloid and dreams as much as it is by bricks and mortar, steel and glass. To borrow an insight from that master observer of New York, E. B. White, there are roughly three New Yorks: that of the natives, that of the commuters, and that of the settlers. That notion was true when White wrote “Here is New York” in 1948, and it strikes me as being resoundingly true today. Like him, I believe that the third New York will always be the most important, the most vital, because it is the one whose foundations are laid first in the minds of human beings born and living elsewhere – those for whom New York City is the ultimate destination. When the settler-dreamers hit the bedrock, having crossed bodies of water, been coughed up through tubes or tunnels or deposited by planes, it is up to them – to us – to turn those dreams into something resembling reality. And because New York has a unique capacity to absorb whatever is thrown at it and whomever arrives on its shores, they invariably do play their own unique part in shaping what happens next in the mighty pageant that is life here. Although, not always: New York also spits out more dejected and disappointed souls than any other city on earth. We transplanted “New Yorkers” must also live with the lurking shadow of that possibility every day. **** The music fades, the needle lifts, and a bearded barista with complicated tattoos on his forearms whom I’d wager lives in Brooklyn goes to flip the record to its B-Side. Which reminds me of a startling fact: the first jazz disc ever to be cut in the world was cut in New York. Ever in the world! It was Nick La Rocca’s Original Dixieland Jazz Band with “Livery Stable Blues”, in early 1917. But I plucked that particular “first” from the sky; really it’s not so startling – New York is a city of firsts. A city of human beings calmly doing things that will forever alter the direction of how those things can be done. From sculptors to subway contractors; from traders of sundries to traders of derivatives; from writers of music to writers of insurance to writers of code. Right now, I wonder, how many blocks am I from wonder? A short stroll in any direction and I might run into a movie crew shooting on a corner of Bleecker whose young director, as yet unknown, will win an Oscar next year; I might walk past an innocuous office building on Houston in which employees at a start-up whose name we’ve never heard of are busy inventing the next game-changing technology that we will soon all take for granted; I may glance at construction workers on a downtown skyscraper site whose silhouette will one day be a byword, a metaphor, a symbol for something the whole world understands – or maybe will just be a building so beautiful it makes people weep. This guy sitting next to me, meanwhile, tapping away on his laptop; for all I know he could be writing the world’s next Booker-winning novel. This is New York. Since arriving at this café, moreover, I have seen through these sunlit windows every sort of human face pass along Hudson Street. Even here, in this achingly well-heeled neighborhood where a brownstone townhouse around the corner on Perry is apparently on the market at fifteen million dollars (“What the hell – I’ll take two!”) I have seen faces old and young; faces black and brown and pink and white and many shades of grey. Faces beautiful and completely unmemorable; faces brimful of life; faces seemingly close to death. Perhaps these faces come from Puerto Rico, from Sierra Leone, from Mexico, England, Haiti, Cuba, Latvia, Kenya, Russia, Ireland or Italy. Perhaps from China, Tunisia, Wales, India, Jamaica, New Zealand, Greece or Poland. Perhaps they were born in a gleaming hospital uptown, or in a railroad apartment in an outer borough; perhaps they were born half way around the world. But here in New York they are. And as White memorably observed: “the collision and the intermingling of these millions of foreign-born people representing so many races and creeds make New York a permanent exhibit of the phenomenon of one world.” The phenomenon of one world. We know all this, of course. New York as a racial melting pot, a magnet for all comers, a global crucible of creativity: all of this has been said in myriad ways, by multitudes and over many years. But just as New York has every type of potential racial problem and for the most part enjoys a continuing and frankly miraculous city-wide tolerance, an “inviolate truce” between peoples, what astounds me is how the things we know about the city – the clichés and stereotypes, the myths and legends – go on being true, and indeed, get truer. Why? How? How do you work, New York? How are you even plausible? **** When you tell people you live in New York, I have found, reactions generally divide into those whose eyes widen with envy and those who wrinkle their brows in horror – or, worse, pity. “Oh no,” they shake their head, “I could never live there – so noisy, so dirty, so smelly. And why does everyone have to be so unbelievably rude?” There are also those who grumble that New York has somehow lost its character; been homogenised and commercialised and overrun by identical shops, adverts and tourists who genuinely appear to think queuing outside Abercrombie & Fitch a valid use of time. Well, yes. Surely Broadway has its grim bits; clearly one does well to avoid Times Square. Obviously you ignore the horse-and-cart guys in Central Park and of course you don’t eat at Olive Garden or wait forty-five minutes for a Magnolia Bakery cupcake. And of course New York is smelly and dirty and busy and crowded. If White thought in 1948 that “the normal frustrations of modern life are here multiplied and amplified” he would possibly be dismayed (but not surprised) to discover that more than half a century on there is still “not enough air and not enough light, and there is usually either too much heat or too little”. But in general, I believe, New York still has more life and curiosity and character in a single city block than even – dare I say it – London. And I’m a born and bred London girl who once suspected that if you were to cut my veins I would bleed the Thames. (I have also lived in Paris, and - hit me over the head with a baguette – I’m afraid that glorious capital does not compare either.) For more than three years, for example, my local Subway stop has been Grand Central. Rushing across the Main Concourse before I head underground to catch a train, I try always to look up at the ceiling and promise myself I will never, ever take such a sight for granted. When back in London, equally, I remind myself not to sigh in inevitable disappointment when I board the Piccadilly Line to go home. It’s a grossly unfair comparison, of course: how could poor old Hammersmith, my local Tube, ever hope to win against those majestic cathedral glories on 42nd Street? But that’s the point, isn’t it? **** In January 2012, the population of the entire New York City metropolitan area hit nineteen million people. It can be lonely here; sometimes unutterably so: a teeming place of human isolation and even desperation. By Grand Central Station I have indeed sat down and wept. But as White also captured brilliantly: “Although New York often imparts a feeling of great forlornness or forsakenness… you always feel that either by shifting your location ten blocks or by reducing your fortune by five dollars you can experience rejuvenation.” Reducing one’s fortune by five dollars here, by the way, remains the easiest damn thing in the world. Another cup of coffee at this very café, especially if accompanied by one of those artisanal sea-salt cookies they bake downstairs, will barely leave me change from twice that. In a doorway down the street, some wit has stuck a poster referencing the iconic slogan: I CAN’T AFFORD TO  NY. It has probably never been more difficult or more expensive to live in New York. Yet I and so many others would not be anywhere else in the world. Shifting my location, I will take my five bucks and get another coffee at some other place, ten blocks away, twenty, or who knows where. It doesn’t matter where I go: I open the door and the universe awaits. CLEMENCY BURTON-HIL, NEW YORK CITY, OCTOBER 2012

Jannine Gallant

Write what you know. Jannine Gallant has taken this advice to heart, creating characters from small towns and plots that unfold in the great outdoors. She grew up in a tiny Northern California town and currently lives in beautiful Lake Tahoe with her husband and two daughters. When she isn't busy writing or being a full time mom, Jannine hikes or snowshoes in the woods around her home. Whether she's writing contemporary, historical or romantic suspense, Jannine brings the beauty of nature to her stories.To find out more about Jannine and her books, visit her website at www.janninegallant.com, find her on Facebook www.facebook.com/JannineGallant.Author and follow her on Twitter @JannineGallant.

CHAPTER SAMPLER

eBook of Month

Evil will follow you… Wherever you go. Can you find a way to hide? If you like Karen Rose, Katia Lief or Mary Burton you’ll love Debra Webb’s bestselling Faces of Evil series. Click below to read the first chapter of the third instalment, POWER, published for the first time in the UK this month.

POWER by Debra Webb

eBook of the month

Evil will follow you… Wherever you go. Can you find a way to hide? If you like Karen Rose, Katia Lief or Mary Burton you’ll love Debra Webb’s bestselling Faces of Evil series. Click below to read the first chapter of the third instalment, POWER, published for the first time in the UK this month.