Related to: 'Joel Dommett'

Headline

It's Not Me, It's Them

Joel Dommett
Authors:
Joel Dommett

Effortless humour and bucketloads of charm. It's impossible not to be bowled over by the ending. Most definitely my favourite celebrity memoir in a long time. Brilliant. - The SunThe **Sunday Times bestselling** memoir from the star of I'm a Celebrity and Extra Camp As a 17-year-old virgin working . . . for Virgin, Joel Dommett has grand ambitions. Firstly, he is going to swap suburbia for the bright lights of Showbiz. Secondly, he is going to find 'the one' - and sets himself the very achievable target of finding her in the first fifty people he's definitely going to sleep with. What follows is a series of disastrous romantic encounters, including carpets mistaken for toilets, futile grand gestures and the catfishing to end all catfishing. Featuring genuine teenage diary entries and told in Joel's trademark self-deprecating style, this is the brilliant first book from the UK's most exciting comedian.

Headline

I'm Sorry, I Love You: A History of Professional Wrestling

Jim Smallman
Authors:
Jim Smallman

'Filled with passion, humour, and a little bit of welcome weirdness. A must-read for every die-hard wrestling fan' - Mick FoleyFor fans of books from Chris Jericho, Steve Austin, Daniel Bryan, Mick Foley and Jim Ross. 'We have all felt every emotion today. Remember today, the next time a family member or workmate tells you that wrestling is stupid. We've laughed, we've cried, we've screamed our lungs out. Professional wrestling is the greatest thing in the entire world.' - Jim Smallman, 2016 Comedian and PROGRESS Wrestling founder Jim Smallman takes us on a wild ride through the history of pro-wrestling, from its beginnings at the turn of the twentieth century to the pop-culture, pay-per-view juggernaut that it is today.Join Jim as he looks at the most defining and iconic moments in wrestling's history and attempts to nail down just why this ludicrous, over the top, compelling quasi-sport means so much to so many people.

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Eat, Drink, Run.

Bryony Gordon
Authors:
Bryony Gordon
Tinder Press

I Am, I Am, I Am: Seventeen Brushes With Death

Maggie O'Farrell
Authors:
Maggie O'Farrell
Headline

A History of Heavy Metal

Andrew O'Neill
Authors:
Andrew O'Neill
Headline

Egg and Soldiers

Miles Jupp
Authors:
Miles Jupp
Headline

The Crystal Maze Challenge

Neale Simpson
Authors:
Neale Simpson

The Crystal Maze is back and there's no place like dome. Packed full of over 100 new games, mind benders and riddles, with this book you can now play the ultimate game show in the playground of your own home. Join ranks with family and friends as you travel through the four iconic zones - Aztec, Industrial, Future and Medieval - guided by Maze Master Richard Ayoade. Some games are quick, so you can have a spontaneous game if you fancy, whilst others require a bit more preparation but they can all be played with household items!Test your skill, mental and physical abilities as you try to leap around your living room without touching the floor, solve puzzles and brainteasers, and complete treasure hunts around the house, all the while trying to win the crystals before heading to The Crystal Dome ... and remembering not to leave anyone locked in any cupboards! The Crystal Maze is ready and waiting ... will you start the fans please!

Headline

James Acaster's Classic Scrapes - The Hilarious Sunday Times Bestseller

James Acaster
Authors:
James Acaster

**THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER** 'I don't think I've ever read a book that has made me cry with laughter as much as this one. It was very difficult reading it in public as I looked like a madman' - Richard Herring 'James Acaster has a brilliant comic mind, crackling with energy every bit as much as his corduroy slacks' - Milton JonesJames Acaster has been nominated for the Edinburgh Comedy Award five times and has appeared on prime-time TV shows like MOCK THE WEEK, LIVE AT THE APOLLO and RUSSELL HOWARD'S STAND UP CENTRAL.But behind the fame and critical acclaim is a man perpetually getting into trouble. Whether it's disappointing a skydiving instructor mid-flight, hiding from thugs in a bush wearing a bright red dress, or annoying the Kettering Board Games club, a didgeridoo-playing conspiracy theorist and some bemused Christians, James is always finding new ways to embarrass himself.Appearing on Josh Widdicombe's radio show to recount these stories, the feature was christened 'James Acaster's classic scrapes'. Here, in his first book, James recounts these tales (including never-before-heard stories) along with self-penned drawings, in all their glorious stupidity.(P)2017 Headline Publishing Group Ltd

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Duke (Leopards of Normandy 2)

David Churchill
Authors:
David Churchill
Headline Review

Jane Steele

Lyndsay Faye
Authors:
Lyndsay Faye

'Reader, I murdered him.' JANE STEELE is a brilliant Gothic retelling of JANE EYRE from Edgar-nominated Lyndsay Faye, for fans of LONGBOURN and PRIDE AND PREJUDICE AND ZOMBIES. 'I loved it' - Elly Griffiths.** JANE STEELE HAS BEEN NOMINATED FOR AN EDGAR AWARD FOR BEST NOVEL 2017 **Like the heroine of the novel she adores, Jane Steele suffers cruelly at the hands of her aunt and schoolmaster. And like Jane Eyre, they call her wicked - but in her case, she fears the accusation is true. When she flees, she leaves behind the corpses of her tormentors. A fugitive navigating London's underbelly, Jane rights wrongs on behalf of the have-nots whilst avoiding the noose. Until an advertisement catches her eye. Her aunt has died and the new master at Highgate House, Mr Thornfield, seeks a governess. Anxious to know if she is Highgate's true heir, Jane takes the position and is soon caught up in the household's strange spell. When she falls in love with the mysterious Charles Thornfield, she faces a terrible dilemma: can she possess him - body, soul and secrets - and what if he discovers her murderous past?(P)2016 Headline Digital

Headline Review

666 Charing Cross Road

Paul Magrs
Authors:
Paul Magrs

From olde London Town to the juicy heart of the Big Apple, something is waiting to biteShelley didn't expect her posh new boyfriend Daniel to be enthralled by the quintessence of evil. She's preoccupied with the surprise success of Bessie, the oddly lifelike centrepiece of her Manhattan museum show. Her great-aunt Liza is busy ordering spooky old books from the dusty vaults below Charing Cross Road, while her friend Jack prefers brand-new books and his brand-new lover. When a little leather book arrives, Liza finds it repellent, but doesn't realise it's stained with vampire blood - until too late. Its arcane magic brings Bessie to life, and gives Daniel unimaginable power. As Daniel's supremacy grows, everyone's lives are infected. Soon the vicious vampire infestation rife in NYC threatens to spread to London - and only Bessie and her new friends can stop it...

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It Just Slipped Out

Russell Ash
Authors:
Russell Ash

'Such was Catherine Morland at ten. At fifteen appearances were mending; she began to curl her hair and long for balls...' (Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey)'Will it jerk me off?' (Margaret Thatcher, inspecting a field gun in the Falklands)'You know, animals are very psychic. I mean, the least sign of danger and my pussy's hair stands on end' (Mrs Slocombe, Are You Being Served?)From the unwittingly filthy, to the gleefully subversive, double entendres have been making us laugh for centuries. In this hilarious survey, Russell Ash uncovers some of history's dirtiest double meanings. From the smut lurking between the polished lines of literature's most revered writers, to the public innuendo accidents that have tripped up even the most respected of politicians, right through to the sly innuendo that has characterized some of our best-loved comedies, IT JUST SLIPPED OUT has it all.

Headline Review

It's Different for Girls

Jo Brand
Authors:
Jo Brand

A wonderfully funny and poignant novel about growing up in the seventies, teenage angst, growing pains and first love.Rachel and Susan do not like to be beside the seaside. Hastings is so uncool. Plunging headfirst into the choppy waters of adolescence, they are determined to survive their teens by sticking together. It's a rollercoaster ride of nutty parents, randy language students, stoned hippies, all-night parties on the pier, and an amusement arcade of emotional neediness.

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Black and Blue

Paul Canoville
Authors:
Paul Canoville

Paul Canovilles story is one of extreme racist bigotry, shattering career-ending injury, a decline into drug abuse, battles against cancer, family tragedy and a determination to beat the odds. Canoville was Chelsea's first black first-team player, making his debut in 1982. But as he warmed up on the touchline, his own supporters began chanting 'We don't want the nigger!' The racist bile continued whenever he played, but within a year he had won over the terraces with his explosive pace and skill. Canoville fell out with the Chelsea board and moved to Reading in 1986, where injury suddenly ended his career at the age of 24. This started a downward spiral including the death of his baby in his arms, two bouts of life-threatening lymph cancer, drug abuse and homelessness. But Canoville fought back. In this explosive and shocking story, Paul finally explains why, despite everything, he is more positive than ever and has remained a fervent Chelsea fan all his life. This is a story of hope - eventually - overcoming adversity.

Posted by Emylia Hall, Author

An Eventful Year, a Slamming End

2012 was eventful in all of the right ways. Over the years I’ve been to plenty of literary festivals on the coat tails of my husband Bobby (one half of the comic book duo The Etherington Brothers), always happy in my role as WAG. In 2012 however, I was hitting the road for the first time as an author in my own right. I knew I enjoyed the lanyards, the green room snacks, the linen jacket spotting, but the actual ‘appearing’ part? I seem sociable, I think I probably am, but I also love the solitary side of being a writer; disappearing into my own head, communing, for hours on end, with no one except the people I’m making up. Talking to a crowd of strangers isn’t necessarily the most natural fit with such a cloistered pursuit but it is part of the job of and, happily, I’ve discovered that I really like it. At the Edinburgh Festival I shared a stage with the brilliant Norwegian author Karl Ove Knausgaard (the New York Times dubbed him a ‘bad boy of European letters’ and I got to feel rock and roll by association). Then there was Appledore, a pretty-as-pie spot on the North Devon coast, for a ‘New Voices’ panel with another Richard & Judy book club author Shelley Harris, and Carol Rifka Brunt. A lovely evening of Q&A at Rossiter Books of Ross-on-Wye, one of the nicest indies I’ve ever visited. The Portsmouth Bookfest for an all-Headline panel, where fellow newbie Morgan McCarthy and I got to line up with Adele Parks and Emily Barr. The inaugural Penarth Book Festival, with my mum in the audience (and under strict ‘pipe down’ instructions). And to end the year, Book Slam Bristol, the Big Daddy and Founding Father of what’s still being called the ‘new wave’ of live literature events. My first Book Slam experience was in 2009, for the launch of Patrick Neate’s Jerusalem. Patrick was my tutor on an Arvon course the year before, and he founded Book Slam to ‘support a diverse reading culture and stand against what is, for us all, an increasingly monolithic cultural life.’ That evening at The Tabernacle, Roger Robinson read his poetry, Soweto Kinch played sax, and Patrick read from his new novel. I’d never before been to an event that so winningly mixed live literature and music; it was very cool. Book Slam’s monthly nights have been running for nearly a decade now, and the list of alumni is crazy-stellar, as well as supporting new, deserve-to-be-heard voices. The second Book Slam short story anthology, Too Much Too Young, was published a little over a month ago and features brand new stories from the likes of David Nicholls, Marina Lewycka, Jackie Kay, Chris Cleave, and, somehow, me. The collection was celebrated with three launch parties at venues across London, and a first ever event in Bristol at the cool art space of Spike Island. I read from my story, Me and Bobby McGee, along with fellow anthology authors Salena Godden and Nikesh Shukla, while guitarist Robin Allender brought the music. For all the events of the summer, I’d never done anything quite like this. It didn’t help at all to think of the Book Slam I’d attended the week before, how completely charming and brilliant Jackie Kay was at the mic, or how swept away we’d all been by the whirlwind poetry of Luke Wright. Later, I was certainly glad that Salena Godden, whose Stage Presence is in capitals and underscored, and Nikesh, who’d also doubled as our winsome compere, came on after me. But I did my bit, read from my story, and had a ball. Standing up there, I realised there’s something magical about telling a story to a roomful of people, and a privilege to have them listen; there’s a sense of togetherness, we’re bound just as tightly as anybody wants, and a charged stillness descends. I’ve employed these next words of Raymond Carver before and while he’s talking about short stories it feels true of the live literature experience too. It’s certainly been mine, whether on the stage or in the audience. ‘…Our hearts or our intellects will have been moved off the peg just a little from where they were before. Our body temperature will have gone up, or down, by a degree. Then, breathing evenly and steadily once more, we’ll collect ourselves, writers and readers alike, get up, “created of warm blood and nerves”, as a Chekhov characters puts it, and go on to the next thing: Life. Always life.”

CHAPTER SAMPLER

EBOOK OF THE MONTH

AN EXCLUSIVE EXTRACT FROM PAUL DOHERTY'S 100th NOVEL: In the final days of Henry VIII, one man is there to witness the demise of a legend... Master historian Paul Doherty weaves his magic in an epic tale of murderous schemes and a blood-smattered political order.

Posted by Richard Roper, Editorial

Blog: The Rugby World Cup and our man Jonny

As a supporter of England at pretty much anything (tobogganing, tiddlywinks, and that’s just the t’s), there’s one thing I’m used to: the classic pose of dejection. Down on his haunches, the defeated Englishman removes his gumshield, wipes the mixture of mud and sweat from his brow, shakes his head forlornly, and trudges off for the obligatory post-match interview.

Posted by John Wordsworth, Editorial

Blog: Stephen Lloyd Jones Q&A

The Hobbit, chatting wardrobes with C S Lewis, nineteenth century Hungarian hairstyles… Enter the mind of Stephen Lloyd Jones, author of the highly anticipated THE STRING DIARIES.

Posted by Samantha Eades, Publicity

Blog: Headline Hits Harrogate

A couple of weekends ago a conspiracy of crime lovers headed to the historic town of Harrogate for the Theakstons Old Peculier Crime Writing Festival. As a crime fiction super-fan (and a PR for several crime writers) I was proud to be amongst them.

Posted by Ben Willis, Publicity

Blog: Headline Goes To Edinburgh

The Headline Edinburgh Team had no less than FOUR objectives when we planned our trip to the Edinburgh International Book Festival this year: support our awesome authors during their packed-out events; hijack anyone and everyone even marginally famous; glug Irn Bru from a litre glass bottle down a poorly lit side street (pictured); and blast out awesome/ful renditions of One Direction songs at full volume in an overcrowded karaoke booth with people you've only very recently met. And it is with great pride that I can whole-heartedly confirm that we achieved ALL of our goals.