Related to: 'Gennaro's Italian Home Cooking'

Let Jane Feather Sweep You Away

Trapped at the Altar

The cavalcade of horsemen rode into the narrow defile...

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Lucky Harbor Collection 4: It's In His Kiss, He's So Fine, One In A Million

Jill Shalvis
Authors:
Jill Shalvis

Visit the sleepy coastal town of Lucky Harbor in this stunning collection. Books Ten, Eleven and Twelve in New York Times bestseller Jill Shalvis's award-winning series are guaranteed to make you laugh and fall in love. In IT'S IN HIS KISS, Becca has said goodbye to city living and escaped to the beach. And a deliciously sexy surfer might just convince her to stay for good. Boatbuilder and investment genius Sam knows how dangerous it is to mix business and pleasure, but he can't help offering Becca a job just to have her near. Will Becca be tempted to return to her glamorous city life? Or will Sam and this little town steal her heart?In HE'S SO FINE, Olivia's an expert at burying her past. She keeps herself to herself ... until she sees a man drowning - a man she ends up getting up close and personal with. Charter boat captain Cole Donovan enjoys the gorgeous woman throwing her arms around his neck in an effort to 'save' him. But real trouble is about to come Olivia's way. Will it bring her deeper into Cole's heart, or will it be the end of Olivia's days in Lucky Harbor?In ONE IN A MILLION, Callie has no interest in men. A wedding planner who's been jilted at the altar, she's all-too familiar with heartache. But when she returns to her hometown, her high-school crush is sexier than ever. Tanner is a deep-sea diver with a wild past - and now his teenage son is back in his life. He's no role model, but Callie makes him feel he can be the man they both deserve. Could the little town that holds their past hold a beautiful future? Return to this heartwarming little town in the other exclusive Lucky Harbor collections. And don't miss Jill's Cedar Ridge books - the gorgeous series set in the Colorado mountains, that we promise will capture your heart.

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Merry Christmas, Baby & Under the Mistletoe: A Lucky Harbor Omnibus

Jill Shalvis
Authors:
Jill Shalvis

Two enchanting holiday novellas brought together for the first time in this captivating Christmas collection. Fans of Susan Andersen, Bella Andre, Rachel Gibson, Carly Phillips, and Susan Mallery will fall head over heels for New York Times bestselling author Jill Shalvis' Lucky Harbor series. In MERRY CHRISTMAS, BABY, it's a very special holiday for beloved Lucky Harbor couple Sawyer and Chloe... Wild child Chloe Thompson can't believe how much things have changed. She still can't get enough of her sexy husband Sawyer, but he seems to prefer working to impending fatherhood. So tonight, a very pregnant Chloe is escaping her troubles at the town Christmas party. Sheriff Sawyer Thompson hopes surprising Chloe at the party will give him a chance to set things right. But as the snow begins to fall and the wind rages, he wonders whether he can make it back in time. While mother nature conspires to keep Sawyer and Chloe apart, an unexpected arrival will require them to kiss and make up . . . and ring in the happiest holiday Lucky Harbor has ever seen. In UNDER THE MISTLETOE one couple finds here's no place like home for the holidays...The Lucky Harbor Bed & Breakfast is bursting with festive lights and good cheer. But for Mia, Christmas is turning out to be anything other than merry and bright. Her recent break-up with her boyfriend Nick has made her return bittersweet. But then a surprise arrives, when Nick follows her to town bearing gifts-and asking for forgiveness. Nick grew up without a family of his own so he's overwhelmed by the love that Mia receives from all her relatives, gathered together to celebrate the season. Under their watchful eyes, Nick finds earning back her trust the hardest thing he's ever had to do. If he succeeds, he will receive the greatest gift of all, Mia's love for a lifetime.Want more sexy, fun romance? Return to Sunshine, Idaho for more of the captivating Animal Magnetism series, visit spellbinding Lucky Harbor or take a trip to Cedar Ridge's unforgettable Colorado Mountains in Jill's other bestselling series.

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The Accidental Bride: Bride Book 2

Jane Feather
Authors:
Jane Feather

New York Times bestselling author Jane Feather sets her Brides trilogy against the turmoil of the English Civil War, and tells the tales of three unconventional young women who vow they will never marry - only to be overtaken by destiny. Fans of Stephanie Laurens, Julia Quinn and Liz Carlyle will be delighted with these daring brides.The Accidental Bride could only be the story of Phoebe, the 'awkward' one...For four years, Cato, the Marquis of Granville, had been just another man - the uninteresting, somewhat intimidating husband of Phoebe's older sister. But then her sister died, and Phoebe seemed a reasonable substitute. Her forced engagement to him should have been quite a cold-blooded arrangement...except that one day Phoebe looked at Granville - really looked at him - and saw what she'd never seen before: he was darkly, breathtakingly attractive.Once she'd noticed, she couldn't seem to stop noticing, and suddenly Phoebe was disastrously in love. It would be nothing short of torture to be married to Granville, knowing he didn't love her and never would. After all, Phoebe is not the kind of woman men fall in love with - Phoebe with her untidy hair, her rumpled clothes, and her fingers forever ink-stained from the poetry she writes.When running away does not solve her problems, Phoebe decides to try something a little different - something that involves a little change in wardrobe, a daring new attitude, and a bit of brazen seduction.Granville is about to discover that his awkward Phoebe is woman enough even for him...Look for Olivia's delightful story in The Least Likely Bride. For more of Jane Feather's signature romance check out the Blackwater Brides Trilogy and the Cavendish Square Trilogy.

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Honey & Co

Itamar Srulovich, Sarit Packer
Authors:
Itamar Srulovich, Sarit Packer

*Winners of the Jeremy Round Award for Best First Food Book at the Guild of Food Writers Awards**Fortnum & Mason Food & Drink Awards Cookery Book of the Year 2015**Sunday Times Food Book of the Year 2014*'Middle Eastern Cooking at its most inspiring. Brilliantly useful and exquisitely designed.' BBC Good Food Magazine*Best Newcomer in the Observer Food Monthly Awards 2013*This is our food, this is our restaurant - fresh fruit and vegetables, wild honey, big bunches of herbs, crunchy salads, smoky lamb, bread straight from the oven, old-fashioned stews, Middle Eastern traditions, falafel, dips, and plenty of tahini on everything.Squeeze in, grab a chair, ignore or enjoy the noise, the buzz, and tuck in. Leave room for dessert - cheesecake, a marzipan cookie with a Turkish coffee. Let us look after you - welcome to Honey & Co.Chapters include:Mezze; Fresh Salads; Light Dinners; Balls & stuff; Slow cooked; Veggie; Dessert; Drinks

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The Fabulous Baker Brothers

Tom Herbert, Henry Herbert
Authors:
Tom Herbert, Henry Herbert

Baffled by bread? Scared of sourdough? Then fear not, for the Fabulous Baker Brothers are here to show how you just how easy it can be to bake like a professional in your own home.Tom and Henry Herbert are the new faces of British cookery. Tom is a master baker who runs the famous Hobbs House Bakery that has been the family business for five generations. His brother Henry is the acclaimed chef who runs the Hobbs House Butchery right next door.From perfect pizzas and simple chapattis to the ultimate burger and the massive pork pie, here in their first cook book - packed full of mouthwatering new recipes and accompanying their hit Channel 4 series - the Fabulous Baker Brothers show us how mastering a few simple techniques can open the door to a brave new world of wonderful breads and magnificent meaty masterpieces. Bye bye cupcakes. Long live the loaf!

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Mary Berry's Christmas Collection

Mary Berry
Authors:
Mary Berry
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Gennaro's Easy Italian

Gennaro Contaldo
Authors:
Gennaro Contaldo

GENNARO'S EASY ITALIAN includes over 100 straightforward recipes that can be cooked by anyone in less than 45 minutes. Including everyday staples, creative uses of leftovers and fantastic tasty dishes and treats for children, the recipes are also perfect for easy entertaining.The book includes classics such as Tomato Sauce and Minestrone, to more unusual dishes such as Strawberry Risotto, and not forgetting the delights of Lemon and Almond Cake, Biscotti and Amaretto Ice Cream.

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Gennaro's Italian Year

Gennaro Contaldo
Authors:
Gennaro Contaldo
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Gennaro's Italian Home Cooking

Gennaro Contaldo
Authors:
Gennaro Contaldo

When an Italian cooks dinner, it's always a meal to savour and enjoy with as many people as can be found to share it with. In GENNARO'S HOME COOKING, Gennaro shares his favourite family recipes - the ones that will feed a crowd of hungry guests, from his 90-year-old father to his three-year-old twin girls. Older generations give advice, all hands are on deck to help, and the whole family sit themselves down at the large dining table to join in the feast together. The table is like the altar - to eat, drink, discuss, argue and confess - but most of all to enjoy the wonderful food! All the recipes cater for large numbers of people, but have tips on how to adapt them for smaller groups, there are hints on how to prepare things in advance and advice on which dishes go with what, so it is full of creative menu ideas. With GENNARO'S HOME COOKING you have everything you need to make your own kitchen a little slice of Italy.

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Passione

Gennaro Contaldo
Authors:
Gennaro Contaldo
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Unnatural Justice (Oz Blackstone series, Book 7)

Quintin Jardine
Authors:
Quintin Jardine

Gennaro Contaldo

Gennaro Contaldo was born in Minori on the Amalfi coast, where he first started helping in local restaurant kitchens at the age of eight. He came to Britain in the late 1960s and spent his first years travelling around the country, working in local village restaurants and studying wild food. He then came to London where he worked as a chef in a number of restaurants before opening the award-winning 'Passione'. We first met Gennaro Contaldo as the chef who inspired Jamie Oliver when they had worked together at Carluccio's. Since then Gennaro's quintessentially Italian spirit has made him a TV favourite and these days he divides his time between inspiring us to cook authentic Italian food through his books, magazine and television appearances, and working with Jamie on his 'Jamie's Italian' restaurants. Gennaro lives in north-east London with his partner, Liz, and their six-year-old twin girls Olivia and Chloe.

Henry Herbert

Last year Henry, 24, left his role as Head Chef of the award winning Coach and Horses in Clerkenwell to face a new challenge, buying the traditional butchers next door to his brother Tom`s bakery. Now the two work and cook side by side, professionally and domestically, creating every element of a meal; from the bun to the burgers and even the homemade pickles that top them off.

Mary Berry

Mary Berry is the nation's favourite baker and home cook. The much-loved judge of The Great British Bake Off, Mary is the author of more than 70 cookbooks. Mary is loved for her practical and unfussy approach to cooking, but when she is at home, she loves to be with her family and tending her garden - her other great passion.

Tom Herbert

Fresh out of baking college, Tom won Baker Of the Year and his signature sourdough has won Organic Loaf of the Year 9 times in the last 10 years. Now, along with his butcher brother Henry, the two work and cook side by side, professionally and domestically, creating every element of a meal; from the bun to the burgers and even the homemade pickles that top them off.

By Clemency Burton-Hill

New York, New York

Being a freelance writer has its upsides and its down; but an indisputable up is the ability to choose one’s office daily. As I write, I am sitting in a small café on Hudson and Charles, spotted on a whim as I crossed over the street from Seventh Avenue. It boasts walls of exposed old brick and studiedly shabby wooden furniture; a vinyl record of jazz turns on a gramophone in the corner. October sunlight slants lazily across the street and slinks in through the café windows, gilding a wall of analogue photographs depicting the proprietor’s great-grandparents in curling sepia. It is late 2012; the New York headquarters of some of the twenty-first-century’s most cutting-edge technology companies are in the vicinity; but with this chipped mug of coffee in my hands here and that Charlie Parker LP spinning there, I could be occupying the sort of contemplative corner spot that any number of human characters in New York may have occupied before me. Other years, other faces, other times. People sometimes complain that Greenwich Village, like much in Manhattan, has “altered beyond recognition” and I’m sure in many ways it has – it is in the very nature of this town; the very name of this town, to enshrine the possibility of change. But I also know, I feel intuitively, that there is still in these streets the unwavering spirit of the old city, catering generously and eternally to the needs of those whose hearts are open, curious and yearning. There’s no place like this on earth. In other words, New York’s still got it. **** When I turned eighteen, I was given a subscription to the New Yorker for my birthday. A decade later, almost to the day, I moved to Manhattan and for the first few months I lived here, the simplest and most wondrous of the inestimable gifts this city bestows seemed to be this: that I could open those storied pages, flip to Goings On About Town, and, if I so desired, “go on about town”. I could read about a jazz gig, a book reading, a film opening, a symphony or rock concert, an opera, a play, a new restaurant and, bank balance permitting, experience it that same night. Back in my hometown of London – itself a city not without wonder – reading the Goings On section of the New Yorker became a weekly act of masochism, yielding predictable twists of almost palpable longing. To read about what was happening that same night across the Atlantic; to dream, to imagine, but to only be able to imagine – to not be in New York was sometimes too much to bear. Yet this is a city that has always been created by the imagination; a metropolis lovingly constructed in ink and paper and celluloid and dreams as much as it is by bricks and mortar, steel and glass. To borrow an insight from that master observer of New York, E. B. White, there are roughly three New Yorks: that of the natives, that of the commuters, and that of the settlers. That notion was true when White wrote “Here is New York” in 1948, and it strikes me as being resoundingly true today. Like him, I believe that the third New York will always be the most important, the most vital, because it is the one whose foundations are laid first in the minds of human beings born and living elsewhere – those for whom New York City is the ultimate destination. When the settler-dreamers hit the bedrock, having crossed bodies of water, been coughed up through tubes or tunnels or deposited by planes, it is up to them – to us – to turn those dreams into something resembling reality. And because New York has a unique capacity to absorb whatever is thrown at it and whomever arrives on its shores, they invariably do play their own unique part in shaping what happens next in the mighty pageant that is life here. Although, not always: New York also spits out more dejected and disappointed souls than any other city on earth. We transplanted “New Yorkers” must also live with the lurking shadow of that possibility every day. **** The music fades, the needle lifts, and a bearded barista with complicated tattoos on his forearms whom I’d wager lives in Brooklyn goes to flip the record to its B-Side. Which reminds me of a startling fact: the first jazz disc ever to be cut in the world was cut in New York. Ever in the world! It was Nick La Rocca’s Original Dixieland Jazz Band with “Livery Stable Blues”, in early 1917. But I plucked that particular “first” from the sky; really it’s not so startling – New York is a city of firsts. A city of human beings calmly doing things that will forever alter the direction of how those things can be done. From sculptors to subway contractors; from traders of sundries to traders of derivatives; from writers of music to writers of insurance to writers of code. Right now, I wonder, how many blocks am I from wonder? A short stroll in any direction and I might run into a movie crew shooting on a corner of Bleecker whose young director, as yet unknown, will win an Oscar next year; I might walk past an innocuous office building on Houston in which employees at a start-up whose name we’ve never heard of are busy inventing the next game-changing technology that we will soon all take for granted; I may glance at construction workers on a downtown skyscraper site whose silhouette will one day be a byword, a metaphor, a symbol for something the whole world understands – or maybe will just be a building so beautiful it makes people weep. This guy sitting next to me, meanwhile, tapping away on his laptop; for all I know he could be writing the world’s next Booker-winning novel. This is New York. Since arriving at this café, moreover, I have seen through these sunlit windows every sort of human face pass along Hudson Street. Even here, in this achingly well-heeled neighborhood where a brownstone townhouse around the corner on Perry is apparently on the market at fifteen million dollars (“What the hell – I’ll take two!”) I have seen faces old and young; faces black and brown and pink and white and many shades of grey. Faces beautiful and completely unmemorable; faces brimful of life; faces seemingly close to death. Perhaps these faces come from Puerto Rico, from Sierra Leone, from Mexico, England, Haiti, Cuba, Latvia, Kenya, Russia, Ireland or Italy. Perhaps from China, Tunisia, Wales, India, Jamaica, New Zealand, Greece or Poland. Perhaps they were born in a gleaming hospital uptown, or in a railroad apartment in an outer borough; perhaps they were born half way around the world. But here in New York they are. And as White memorably observed: “the collision and the intermingling of these millions of foreign-born people representing so many races and creeds make New York a permanent exhibit of the phenomenon of one world.” The phenomenon of one world. We know all this, of course. New York as a racial melting pot, a magnet for all comers, a global crucible of creativity: all of this has been said in myriad ways, by multitudes and over many years. But just as New York has every type of potential racial problem and for the most part enjoys a continuing and frankly miraculous city-wide tolerance, an “inviolate truce” between peoples, what astounds me is how the things we know about the city – the clichés and stereotypes, the myths and legends – go on being true, and indeed, get truer. Why? How? How do you work, New York? How are you even plausible? **** When you tell people you live in New York, I have found, reactions generally divide into those whose eyes widen with envy and those who wrinkle their brows in horror – or, worse, pity. “Oh no,” they shake their head, “I could never live there – so noisy, so dirty, so smelly. And why does everyone have to be so unbelievably rude?” There are also those who grumble that New York has somehow lost its character; been homogenised and commercialised and overrun by identical shops, adverts and tourists who genuinely appear to think queuing outside Abercrombie & Fitch a valid use of time. Well, yes. Surely Broadway has its grim bits; clearly one does well to avoid Times Square. Obviously you ignore the horse-and-cart guys in Central Park and of course you don’t eat at Olive Garden or wait forty-five minutes for a Magnolia Bakery cupcake. And of course New York is smelly and dirty and busy and crowded. If White thought in 1948 that “the normal frustrations of modern life are here multiplied and amplified” he would possibly be dismayed (but not surprised) to discover that more than half a century on there is still “not enough air and not enough light, and there is usually either too much heat or too little”. But in general, I believe, New York still has more life and curiosity and character in a single city block than even – dare I say it – London. And I’m a born and bred London girl who once suspected that if you were to cut my veins I would bleed the Thames. (I have also lived in Paris, and - hit me over the head with a baguette – I’m afraid that glorious capital does not compare either.) For more than three years, for example, my local Subway stop has been Grand Central. Rushing across the Main Concourse before I head underground to catch a train, I try always to look up at the ceiling and promise myself I will never, ever take such a sight for granted. When back in London, equally, I remind myself not to sigh in inevitable disappointment when I board the Piccadilly Line to go home. It’s a grossly unfair comparison, of course: how could poor old Hammersmith, my local Tube, ever hope to win against those majestic cathedral glories on 42nd Street? But that’s the point, isn’t it? **** In January 2012, the population of the entire New York City metropolitan area hit nineteen million people. It can be lonely here; sometimes unutterably so: a teeming place of human isolation and even desperation. By Grand Central Station I have indeed sat down and wept. But as White also captured brilliantly: “Although New York often imparts a feeling of great forlornness or forsakenness… you always feel that either by shifting your location ten blocks or by reducing your fortune by five dollars you can experience rejuvenation.” Reducing one’s fortune by five dollars here, by the way, remains the easiest damn thing in the world. Another cup of coffee at this very café, especially if accompanied by one of those artisanal sea-salt cookies they bake downstairs, will barely leave me change from twice that. In a doorway down the street, some wit has stuck a poster referencing the iconic slogan: I CAN’T AFFORD TO  NY. It has probably never been more difficult or more expensive to live in New York. Yet I and so many others would not be anywhere else in the world. Shifting my location, I will take my five bucks and get another coffee at some other place, ten blocks away, twenty, or who knows where. It doesn’t matter where I go: I open the door and the universe awaits. CLEMENCY BURTON-HIL, NEW YORK CITY, OCTOBER 2012

Posted by Helena Towers, Publicity

Blog: A Recipe for Love

It may be apparent from this blog that Headliners are quite fond of baking cakes, but what might not be apparent is that we’re even better at eating the end result. Usain Bolt would be quaking in his trainers if he saw how quickly people move when an email goes round about leftover cake in the kitchen.

Posted by Laura Skerritt, Creative and Marketing

Blog: THE HOPE FACTORY meets THE URBAN RAJAH

Enjoy this extract from Lavanya Sankaran’s THE HOPE FACTORY, followed by two light, delicious recipes from THE URBAN RAJAH’S CURRY MEMOIRS, perfect for parties. Perhaps Anand would have chosen to serve dishes like them if his father-in-law hadn’t had his way…!

Jill Shalvis

Merry Christmas, Baby

Two enchanting holiday novellas brought together for the first time in this captivating Christmas collection. Fans of Susan Andersen, Bella Andre, Rachel Gibson, Carly Phillips, and Susan Mallery will fall head over heels for New York Times bestselling author Jill Shalvis' Lucky Harbor series.

The perfect place to write a novel

Blog: The Writing Shed

What's your commute like? Mine's not so bad. Out the back door, across the deck, down the steps, skip across the lawn on the railway sleeper stepping stones and I'm there. My name is Julia Crouch and I am a shed worker. About ten years ago, I was running a very busy graphic design/illustration business from one end of the attic bedroom I share with my actor husband. When he was home from tour he tended to work there too, writing plays in our bed at the other end. With three kids crammed into our tiny terraced house, there was nowhere else for us to go. But our bedroom was hardly a sanctuary from our busy lives. Instead it was a major part of it all. I had two desks in it (one for computer and gear, the other for dirty work - paint/pencil/charcoal/collage), an A3 printer and a giant plan chest. Every available surface was taken up with bits of paper, books and various other sorts of equipment. And then, from time to time, Tim was there, too, with all his work stuff as well. Something had to give. So, when I had a particularly good year, I decided to invest some of my profits in building a garden studio. I bought it from a company that specialises in what they call 'huts'. All we had to do was make a level concrete base and run out the electrics and, within a couple of days, the prefabricated office was up and standing, ready for me to move all my gear out of the house and down to the bottom of our small garden. With this quiet, leafy retreat, I found that not only had I bought myself actual space, I had also secured a place where my imagination could grow and flourish. Having been with my husband since we were at university, it was the first time since childhood that I had had a room all to myself. I furnished it exactly as I wanted, filling it only with things I wanted to be there. It was, quite literally, a room of my own, kept as tidy or as messy as I feel like, removed from the domestic pressures and distractions of the house and children, yet close enough to be present in case of disaster or need. It was precisely because of all this physical and mental space that, about six years ago, I started to write in earnest. I'd do my money-earning work, then, every day, I'd stay down in the shed and work for an hour or so on short stories and, later, my novels. When I got my book deal with Headline, I happily and quickly gave up the day job, then instantly set about reconfiguring my shed. The plan chest was exchanged with an artist friend for a woodcut and the dirty work table went off to Freecycle. The liberated space now houses a cushion-covered day bed. This is where I read and dream stuff up, although I generally have to write at my desk in my fancy back-friendly chair. I've got some great wireless speakers down here now, so I can fill the space with the background music I've found helps the words out like nothing else. The walls around my desk are decorated with a mixture of artworks and ephemera relating to my current work in progress – currently lots of Greek stuff, because my fourth novel is partly set on the island of Ikaria. And behind me there is a whole wall of books – novels to be read, research items, reference books and writing books. I do about eighty per cent of my writing down here now. Although I have a heater and the shed is well insulated, sometimes, when the weather is really freezing, I prefer to curl up in front of the living room woodburner to work. Other times I need a change of scene just to chivvy things along, so I go out and work in one of the many great little cafés we have here in Brighton. But, on a day like this, when the sun is bright, and the birds are doing their spring thing, there's nowhere better. I have the doors and windows open, paperweights holding everything down against the breeze, my two cats sleep in a spot of sunlight on the day bed, and Nick Cave sings God is in the House on the speakers. What more can a writer girl want, really?