Related to: 'Doctor and Doctor: Incredible True Tales From a GP's Surgery'

Silver Award for New Group Websites

Hachette UK wins at Digital Impact Awards

Hachette UK, in partnership with The BIO Agency (Big Ideas Online) won a Silver Award at the 2012 Digital Impact Awards on Tuesday 16th October. The awards, founded in 2011, are Europe's most prominent programme of recognition of excellence in digital stakeholder communications and the UK's largest celebration of digital communication.

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The World According to Foggy

Carl Fogarty
Authors:
Carl Fogarty
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The Big Bang Theory Trivia Quiz Book

Warner Bros, Adam Faberman
Authors:
Warner Bros, Adam Faberman

What did Amy name her electric toothbrush?What does Leonard bring Penny back from the North Pole? The Big Bang Theory Trivia Quiz Book is the first official book to accompany one of the world's favourite and funniest comedies. Including 1,600 questions from series 1 to 8, along with photos, hilarious quotes, a complete episode guide and fun features, such as excerpts from the Roommate Agreement and your chance to play 'Emily or Cinnamon', this book will remind you of all your favourite Big Bang moments.

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Doctor's Notes

Dr Rosemary Leonard
Authors:
Dr Rosemary Leonard

'I'm in the wrong job,' I said to our practice nurse, 'I should definitely have been a detective.'For BBC Breakfast's Dr Rosemary Leonard, a day in her GP's surgery is full of unexplained ailments and mysteries to be solved.From questions of paternity to apparently drug-resistant symptoms, these mysteries can sometimes take a while to get to the bottom of, especially when they are of a more intimate nature.In her second book about life in her London surgery, Dr Rosemary recalls some of her most puzzling cases... and their rather surprising explanations.

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Doctor's Notes

Dr Rosemary Leonard
Authors:
Dr Rosemary Leonard
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The Great Crown Jewels Robbery of 1303

Paul Doherty
Authors:
Paul Doherty

An insight into one of history's most cunning, yet overlooked, events...Medieval London comes to life in Paul Doherty's gripping retelling of this early attempt to steal the Crown Jewels, the first great bank raid in history.'Doherty tells the tale with verve incorporating much fascinating historical detail' - Historical Novels ReviewIn the reign of King Charles II (1660 - 1685), there was a famous attempt to steal the crown jewels by the memorably named Colonel Blood. However, Blood's conspiracy was not the first such plot, and it was certainly not the most successful...Three centuries earlier, in 1303, Edward I of England (of Braveheart fame) was north of the Scottish border attempting to crush William Wallace, secure in the knowledge that he had stashed his royal treasures safely behind iron-bound doors in Westminster Abbey - a place of sanctity reputed to house Christ's body, and inhabited by pious Benedictine monks.Enter Richard Puddlicott: a former merchant and a charming, dissolute, rogue with a grudge against the king. He infiltrated the Abbey's inner circle (entertaining them on the proceeds of their own silver) and, before long, had managed to help himself to a good part of the treasure. The King's fury knew no bounds, but Puddlicott ran the King's men a merry dance before eventually being captured and sent - along with forty monks - to his death in Westminster.This exhilarating tale of cunning, deceit, lechery, monks, pimps and prostitutes is also the story of the first great bank raid in history. Until now - with most of the evidence still in manuscripts, in Latin or Norman French - very little has been written about it. With his usual verve, blending vivid narrative and historical analysis, Paul Doherty takes the lid off both the medieval underworld and the 'holy' monastic community. The result is historically enlightening and a gripping read.What readers are saying about Paul Doherty:'I was totally gripped. I have read a lot of history books and this is amongst the best I have read''An interesting book, historically accurate and very well researched''Doherty proves that he is a scholar as well as a writer of novels'

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The White Rose Murders (Tudor Mysteries, Book 1)

Paul Doherty
Authors:
Paul Doherty

Anarchy and unrest make for a deadly investigation...In the first journal of Roger Shallot, the Tudor sleuth writes of the murders and villainy perpetrated during the reign of King Henry VIII in Paul Doherty's masterful novel, The White Rose Murders. Perfect for fans of Susannah Gregory and C. J. Sansom.'The best of its kind since the death of Ellis Peters' - Time OutIn 1517 the English armies have defeated and killed James IV of Scotland at Flodden and James's widow-queen, Margaret, sister to Henry VIII, has fled to England, leaving her crown under a Council of Regency.Roger Shallot is drawn into a web of mystery and murder by his close friendship with Benjamin Daunbey, the nephew of Cardinal Wolsey, first minister of Henry VIII. Benjamin and Roger are ordered into Margaret's household to resolve certain mysteries as well as to bring about her restoration to Scotland.They begin by questioning Selkirk, a half-mad physician imprisoned in the Tower. He is subsequently found poisoned in a locked chamber guarded by soldiers. The only clue is a poem of riddles. However, the poem contains the seeds for other gruesome murders. The faceless assassin always leaves a white rose, the mark of Les Blancs Sangliers, a secret society plotting the overthrow of the Tudor monarchy...What readers are saying about The White Rose Murders:'Roger is a rogue and a villain, but so engaging that the reader soon becomes entangled in the complex mysteries''The plots are always original and interesting and populated by a wonderful cast of characters''Paul Doherty has a great talent for describing the gory and realistic details of Tudor life and bases his story on facts, which make it credible as well as a very entertaining whodunit'

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It All Counts

Carol Vorderman
Authors:
Carol Vorderman
Headline Review

It All Counts

Carol Vorderman
Authors:
Carol Vorderman

Carol Vorderman is everywoman: a single working mother, a businesswoman and a devoted daughter. And now, for the first time, she has decided to tell it like it is.Since 1982, Carol was much loved as co-presenter of Countdown with Richard Whiteley. Joining the show at the age of twenty-one after her mother secretly posted off an application, she became the first woman to appear on Channel Four. Vorderman and Whiteley went on to form one of the most endearing partnerships in British TV history. His death in 2005 devastated Carol but she continued to present Countdown until July 2008, when, after twenty-six unbroken years with the show, it was announced that she was stepping down.Carol's life has been a rollercoaster. The youngest of three children, she was just three weeks old when her parents separated. Her father refused to acknowledge Carol, leaving her mother to hold down multiple jobs as the family's only provider. There was a stint in the circus; there have been two marriages; she has juggled a career with two children, whom she adores; she is a detox advocate and has hosted more shows than any other female presenter, including Tomorrow's World, Better Homes, Pride of Britain and, of course, Countdown.In IT ALL COUNTS, Carol tells the engrossing story of her life from an early age through to today - the personal struggles, the good times, the sad times, and lifts the lid on what really goes on behind the scenes in a TV studio and the full story behind her shocking Countdown departure.

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How to be a Happy Mum

Siobhan Freegard, Netmums
Authors:
Siobhan Freegard, Netmums

Much has been written about what to expect of your child in the first year of its life, how to tame toddlers and raise children. In an age prone to overparenting, the time is right for the UK's largest online parenting organisation to put the emphasis back on a mother's needs. Often, the pressure to be the perfect mother can add to a mother's worries - especially first time around. Forget the Yummy Mummy phenomenon that says it's possible to look after a newborn baby, keep your house spic and span, cook gourmet family dinners, and still manage to put your lipstick and heels on. Life isn't really like that. This practical handbook looks at the elements of parenting that can make a mother unhappy and offers information and advice on how to cope. Most importantly this is real advice for real women from real women - the 250,000 members of netmums.com, together with advice from the experts.

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The Call-Up

Tom Hickman
Authors:
Tom Hickman

From 1947 to 1963 some 2.3 million men were conscripted to do national service. For some it was to prove the most exciting and terrifying time of their lives, as many were sent to the Korean War or to countries such as Palestine and Kenya where the terrorist threat was ever-present. They faced death and learned about sex. For others, it was a frustrating interference in their lives, made all the more ridiculous by endless hours of square-bashing or painting coal white.Tom Hickman shows just how varied were the experiences of the recruits. By talking to over 80 veterans, he recalls the hilarious and moving stories from those times, and seeks to explain why the subject still causes debate more than 40 years on. Above all, The Call-Up is a portrait of a vanished era that many still feel has something to teach us today.

Dr Rosemary Leonard

Dr Rosemary Leonard is one of the country's best-known doctors. She is the resident doctor on BBC Breakfast, and also writes for the Daily Express and S magazine, and is the medical editor for both Woman and Home and Tesco Healthy Living.Although she is a regular broadcaster, Rosemary is still very much a practising doctor, working as a part-time GP partner in a busy South London surgery, where she has a special interest in women's health. She trained in medicine at Cambridge University and St Thomas Hospital Medical School. She has been the GP representative on the Committee on Safety of Medicines, is now a member of the Human Genetics Commission and also on the Board of the Health Protection Agency. In 2004 Rosemary was awarded an MBE for her services to healthcare.Rosemary lives with her husband and two sons and enjoys gardening, skiing, hiking and sailing. This is her second book.

Hollie Smith

Hollie Smith's background is in women's weekly magazines, specialising in parenting and health. She spent four years as a commissioning editor for Woman, and has also written for Best, Red, Family Circle, the Daily Mail, the Express, the Mirror and the Times.

Luke Hines

Luke Hines and Scott Gooding cooked their way to the finals in MY KITCHEN RULES with their healthy food philosophy. Luke went on to build a career as a leading health and wellness personality. With six books, numerous television appearances and writing credits in food and fitness publications, Luke's message is simple: nourish your body with the most nutrient dense foods on the planet, keep active in a way that you enjoy, and smile each and every day.Follow Luke online through www.facebook.com/lukehinesonline, www.twitter.com/LukeHinesOnline, www.lukehines.com and www.instagram.com/LukeHinesOnline

Scott Gooding

UK-born Scott Gooding, Luke Hines' fellow MY KITCHEN RULES star and CLEAN LIVING co-author, is a qualified personal trainer and health coach, and owns his own fitness business in Sydney's eastern suburbs. His love of good food and cooking were encouraged at a young age by his parents. Scott's top priority is fuelling kids' nutrition through education.Follow Scott online on www.facebook.com/ScottGoodingFitness, www.twitter.com/ScottyFit, www.scottygoodingproject.com and www.instagram.com/scottyfit

Siobhan Freegard

Siobhan Freegard was raised in a small town in Ireland and came to London when she was 18. She worked her way up the corporate ladder to become a marketing director and then had her first child aged 29. After struggling with the work/life balance, she decided to have a stint as a full-time mum. She is now 41, with three children age 11, 9 and 5. She started Netmums as a result of her own experiences of feeling isolated and overwhelmed by the experience of being a new mum.

24 Sep
Kenton Theatre New Street, Henley-on-Thames, RG9 2BP 01491 575698

Dr Rosemary Leonard at Henley Festival

Four voices TOM FORT, BEN HUNT-DAVIS, DR ROSEMARY LEONARD and GARY MULGREW 7.30pm Kenton Theatre £8 Something new for Henley. Four people share their entertaining, provocative and stimulating views speaking for 10 minutes on a different subject. It could be stories or opinions but recounted with passion, humour and intensity. It is unscripted with only one aim – to keep the audience amused, entertained and attentive. Tonight’s quartet is as varied and talented as you could wish for: Tom Fort – Any man who can write a critically acclaimed book about a road must be worth listening to. Local author Tom’s subject was the A303, the road that took so many of us on our English summer holidays. Roman roads crossed it and drovers’ paths lie beneath it. Its route cuts across some of the finest chalkland in southern England. What memories! The A303 – Highway to the Sun – Simon & Schuster Ben Hunt-Davis – It’s the year of the London Olympics so we need a gold winner. Ben won Gold at Sydney in 2000 and has been part of Team GB’s build-up team. A former pupil at Shiplake College he is now a motivational speaker and runs his own company. Will It Make The Boat Go Faster by Ben Hunt-Davis and Harriet Beveridge – Troubadour Dr Rosemary Leonard – is one of the country’s best-known medical faces through her work as the resident doctor on BBC Breakfast. She has written a delightfully amusing book about the incidents and true stories that have taken place in her GP surgery. Doctor Doctor; incredible true tales from a GP surgery – Headline Gary Mulgrew – One of the ‘Natwest Three’, controversially extradited to America in 2006. Born in Glasgow in 1962 he joined NatWest in 1983 and worked for them in Manchester, London, Tokyo and New York before joining the Royal Bank of Canada in 2000. His banking career ended in June 2002 when he was indicted for allegedly defrauding NatWest. Two years of detention were followed by two years in seven prisons in the United States and England until his full release in early 2010. Gang Of One – Hodder and Stoughton. The bar at the Kenton will remain open after this event and be serving Laithwaite’s wine – an opportunity to meet the speakers.

THE HEIST

Our ebook of the month is THE HEIST, the first adventure in an electrifying new series from Janet Evanovich and Lee Goldberg.

Chapter Sampler

EBOOK OF THE MONTH

Read an exclusive preview of Stephan Talty's BLACK IRISH, which is out now in paperback and ebook.

Posted by Ben Hatch, Author

Blog: Down the Hatch

Daniela, our forager, meets us at our hotel. She’s tall and willowy with mesmeric upper class teeth, the front bottom two of which seem to slope slightly forward like an old-fashioned up and over garage door. She’s wearing brown furry boots, jogging bottoms and a gilet and bounces like a spaceman on the moon. On the drive to the foraging place Daniela tells us she’s also a body and mind therapist and that her boyfriend’s one of the country’s foremost experts on fungi. ‘Self-taught,’ she adds, meaning I’m thinking, ‘Lots of trips to the hospital to have his stomach pumped.’ It’s half-term, we’re in Devon and I don’t want to go foraging. Neither do the kids (Phoebe, 8 and Charlie, 6). It’s windy, cold, too early and I’d rather be eating breakfast back at the hotel. The buffet bangers are under a metal hood beside cooked tomatoes and mushrooms and the toast’s brought straight to the table. There’s no need to forage. But my wife Dinah wants to. Foraging is new, sustainable, cool and growing in popularity, and besides she has to write an article about it. We’re foraging in Sidmouth and, as Daniela scours the banks of the river Ford, the first edible plant she discovers is hogweed. It has a purple furry stem, smells like orange peel, is apparently the poor man’s asparagus and is not to be confused, she tells us, after we’ve eaten some, with giant hogweed that looks a lot like it but has photosensitive juice, which can cause burning of the skin, blisters and lifelong changes to skin colour. As we wait nervously for the potential third degree burns and permanent disfigurement, Daniela snaps off the top of a nettle in her gloved hand and fans it out for us like a bouquet of peonies. It’s great in nettle soup, abundant and our most overlooked salad leaf, she says, her eyes shining. Enthused, the kids sting themselves picking some and Dinah’s so mesmerised by Daniela she leans unwittingly forward to SNIFF the nettles and is stung on the tip of her nose. We move to the beach. It’s now so cold and windblown that Charlie, who hates his coat more than anything in the world, has not only put it on but voluntarily pulled his hood up. Daniela moves along the foot of the rocky cliff and, as the kids complain they want to go, and are periodically blown into the brambles, she finds sea radish, sea plantain, rock samphire and alexanders, although by now I’m dubious. We’ve no idea what anything is. She could be making it up – adding the word ‘sea’ to the front of ordinary vegetables. My knowledge of green things ends at rocket, and Dinah’s so un-outdoorsy she doesn’t even own a proper coat. And besides isn’t there a reason people don’t eat random plants? ‘So have you ever eaten anything poisonous?’ I ask Daniela, as we chew what she’s suspiciously claiming is sea spinach. ‘No,’ she says, picking up something that she seems to believe we’ll accept is actually called ox-eye-daisy or whoopsy-daisy or something like that, ‘but a forager friend of mine,’ she adds, ‘once ate hemlock water drop wart.’ ‘And what happened to him?’ I ask. ‘He went into a coma,’ says Daniela, matter-of-factly. ‘Oh!’ And I look at Dinah, who takes another defiant bite but quietly removes the plant from Phoebe and Charlie’s hands, I notice. ‘What's a coma?’ says Phoebe ‘It's when your heart gets out of control and you go to sleep for a few days and come close to death,’ says Daniela, breezily picking up something else. ‘Here try this. It’s Sea lettuce. No, hang on…’ She drops it, and picks something else. ‘This is Sea lettuce.’ ‘That's why it's best only to eat leaves that experts say is OK,’ I say to the kids. ‘But he was an expert,’ says Phoebe. ‘The simple lesson is never eat anything at all that looks like a flat leaf parsley plant,’ says Daniela. ‘And what do they look like?’ I ask, as Charlie reaches into the undergrowth to independently pick some furry looking leaf he immediately pops into his mouth, but my question’s swept away by the wind, as is Phoebe, who flounders in a clump of what? Sea turnips, sea swedes? sea parsnips? …who knows what this stuff is. Walking back to the car, Daniela tells us that a government minister once told a friend of hers that foraging would become more and more important as the banking system collapsed and currencies devalued and became worthless and people began scouring hedgerows to stay alive. As she says this she is childishly kicking a stone along the dirt path. ‘But that's unsubstantiated,’ she adds, to Dinah, who’s making notes, ‘So don't take it out of context.’ Back at the hotel we catch the end of breakfast. Leaving half an hour later, warm again and bloated with bacon, sausages, toast and egg, the world order still looks relatively intact, leaving me confident enough of our survival over the next 48 hours to abandon the now squashed looking fruits of our foraging labour in the bin.