Related to: '101 World Whiskies to Try Before You Die'

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The Last Palace

Norman Eisen
Authors:
Norman Eisen

For any reader of Edmund de Waal's THE HARE WITH THE AMBER EYES or Erik Larson's IN THE GARDENS OF BEASTS, Norman L Eisen's THE LAST PALACE tells the story of the tumultuous past 100 years in Europe as seen from the most beautiful house in Prague, the Petschek Villa.The Petschek Villa was Norman L Eisen's home during his tenure as US ambassador. In his remarkable book, he details the colourful lives of five of the palace's residents: - the optimistic Jewish financial baron who built the Petschek Villa after World War I as a statement of his faith in Europe, and who died of a broken heart after Europe brutally rejected him, his house, and his hopes - the cultured, complex German general who occupied the palace during World War II, ultimately saving the house and Prague itself from destruction - the American ambassador and Holocaust hero who became obsessed with the property after the war, acquiring it for the US, though neglecting to fight the Communist takeover of Czechoslovakia in the process- his successor 40 years later, an iconic former child star who used her showbiz wiles, with the house as her stage, to help the Velvet Revolution succeed in restoring Czechoslovak democracy- and the author, Norman L Eisen, the son of a Czech Auschwitz survivor, who moved into the palace once seized by the Nazis and found himself battling the lingering ghosts of European intolerance The Last Palace weaves a tapestry that is as vast and as intricate as any that hang in the palace itself. It is also an exploration of the wider themes in international history that have triggered three global wars (two hot and one cold), and threatens the peace of our world today.

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Black Dog

Neil Gaiman
Authors:
Neil Gaiman

A special illustrated edition of Black Dog by bestselling storytelling legend, Neil Gaiman. This American Gods world novella will thrill Games of Thrones devotees and Terry Pratchett fans alike. Illustrations by celebrated artist Daniel Egnéus.'Original, engrossing, and endlessly entertaining' George R.R Martin on American Gods'It followed me home,' he said, conversationally. In a rural northern village, legend tells of a ghostly black dog that appears from the darkness before you die. Shadow Moon has been on the road a while now but he can't walk any further tonight, not with the rain lashing down. Gratefully, he heads home with a nice English couple, who offer a box room, hot whisky and local tales. But when the man collapses en route, Shadow realises that something about this place has been left untold. Something ancient, something within the very walls of the village. Something shadowing them all.

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TED Talks

Chris Anderson
Authors:
Chris Anderson

In the New York Times-bestseller Ted Talks Chris Anderson, head of TED, reveals the inside secrets of how to give a first-class presentation. Where books like Talk Like TED and TED Talks Storytelling whetted the appetite, here is the official TED guide to public speaking from the man who put TED talks on the world's stage. 'Nobody in the world better understands the art and science of public speaking than Chris Anderson. He is absolutely the best person to have written this book' Elizabeth Gilbert.Anderson shares his five key techniques to presentation success: Connection, Narration, Explanation, Persuasion and Revelation (plus the three to avoid). He also answers the most frequently asked questions about giving a talk, from 'What should I wear?' to 'How do I handle my nerves?'.Ted Talks is also full of presentation tips from such TED notable speakers as Sir Ken Robinson, Bill Gates, Mary Roach, Amy Cuddy, Elizabeth Gilbert, Dan Gilbert, Amanda Palmer, Matt Ridley and many more. This is a lively, fun read with great practical application from the man who knows what goes into a truly memorable speech. In Ted Talks Anderson pulls back the TED curtain for anyone who wants to learn how to prepare an exceptional presentation.

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Football Clichés

Adam Hurrey
Authors:
Adam Hurrey
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101 Legendary Whiskies You're Dying to Try But (Possibly) Never Will

Ian Buxton
Authors:
Ian Buxton

Ian Buxton's latest book explores the finest and rarest whiskies in the world: wonderful whisky you're dying to try but probably never will. These drams may be extraordinarily hard to find, impossible to buy or literally the sole survivor of a long-lost distillery - some are even priceless - but, for the first time ever, they're assembled here for you to 'savour'.Some are the Ferraris of whisky: luxury thoroughbreds beyond the reach of all but the most fortunate, discerning and wealthy of enthusiasts and collectors. Some are whisky's equivalent to the Model T Ford - once ubiquitous, but now rendered exceptional by the passage of time. All are legendary.Whether the world's oldest, rarest or most expensive, leading whisky writer Ian Buxton unlocks these liquid treasures and meets the people who make, sell or simply preserve them. 101 Legendary Whiskies You're Dying to Try But (Probably) Never Will shares the secrets of whisky's elite - what makes these whiskies so special, so intriguing and so desirable.

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Circle of Shadows

Imogen Robertson
Authors:
Imogen Robertson
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Prashad Cookbook

Kaushy Patel
Authors:
Kaushy Patel

100 delicious vegetarian Indian recipes from Gordon Ramsay's Best Restaurant runner-up Prashad.The Patels and Prashad, their small Indian restaurant in Bradford, were the surprise stars of Ramsay's Best Restaurant TV show in autumn 2010. Everyone who saw them fell in love with this inspirational family dedicated to serving delicious, original vegetarian food.At the heart of the family is Kaushy, who learned to cook as a child growing up on her grandmother's farm in northern India. On moving to northern England in the 1960s, she brought her passion for fabulous flavours with her and has been perfecting and creating dishes ever since. Never happier than when feeding people, Kaushy took her son Bobby at his word when he suggested that she should share her cooking with the world - a launderette was converted first in to a deli and then a restaurant, and Prashad was born.Now Kaushy shares her cooking secrets - you'll find more than 100 recipes, from simple snacks to sumptuous family dinners, to help you recreate the authentic Prashad experience at home. Whether it's cinnamon-spice chickpea curry, green banana satay, spicy sweetcorn or chaat - the king of street-side India - there's plenty here for everyone to savour and share.

Hachette Scotland

101 World whiskies to try before you die (P)

Ian Buxton
Authors:
Ian Buxton
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You and Your Tween

Netmums, Hollie Smith, Hollie Smith
Authors:
Netmums, Hollie Smith, Hollie Smith

How much time should your child be spending on the computer? How and when should you approach the subject of sex? How do you help them deal with rejection, rivalry and bullying? YOU AND YOUR TWEEN answers all these questions and many more. A comprehensive guide to the challenging years of early adolescence, this book offers advice from a hand-selected panel of experts on everything from education to puberty. But, crucially, there are hundreds of top tips and suggestions from other mums - the members of netmums.com, the rapidly growing online community of mothers sharing valuable information on all aspects of childcare. It's real advice that really works and will help you maintain a healthy relationship with your child through the tricky tween years.

Hachette Scotland

101 Whiskies to Try Before You Die (Revised & Updated)

Ian Buxton
Authors:
Ian Buxton

Fully updated and revised in 2013, 101 Whiskies to Try Before You Die is a whisky guide with a difference. It is not an awards list. It is not a list of the 101 'best' whiskies in the world in the opinion of a self-appointed whisky guru. It is simply a guide to the 101 whiskies that enthusiasts must seek out and try in order to complete their whisky education. Avoiding the deliberately obscure, the ridiculously limited and the absurdly expensive, whisky expert Ian Buxton recommends an eclectic selection of old favourites, stellar newcomers and mystifyingly unknown drams that simply have to be drunk.The book decodes the marketing hype and gets straight to the point; whether from India, America, Sweden, Ireland, Japan or the hills, glens and islands of Scotland, here are the 101 whiskies that you really want. This is a desert island list of whiskies - fully revised and updated in the light of the industry's constant need to keep changing things!Try them before you die - Slainte!

Hachette Scotland

101 Whiskies to Try Before You Die (Revised & Updated)

Ian Buxton
Authors:
Ian Buxton

Fully updated and revised in 2013, 101 Whiskies to Try Before You Die is a whisky guide with a difference. It is not an awards list. It is not a list of the 101 'best' whiskies in the world in the opinion of a self-appointed whisky guru. It is simply a guide to the 101 whiskies that enthusiasts must seek out and try in order to complete their whisky education. Avoiding the deliberately obscure, the ridiculously limited and the absurdly expensive, whisky expert Ian Buxton recommends an eclectic selection of old favourites, stellar newcomers and mystifyingly unknown drams that simply have to be drunk.The book decodes the marketing hype and gets straight to the point; whether from India, America, Sweden, Ireland, Japan or the hills, glens and islands of Scotland, here are the 101 whiskies that you really want. This is a desert island list of whiskies - fully revised and updated in the light of the industry's constant need to keep changing things!Try them before you die - Slainte!

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Toddling to Ten

Siobhan Freegard, Netmums, Hollie Smith
Authors:
Siobhan Freegard, Netmums, Hollie Smith

How do you avoid pyjama dramas and get a toddler to play ball at bedtime? How do you manage your child's time on the computer and kids who are couch potatoes? What do you do when your five year old starts telling lies? All the answers can be found in this comprehensive guide to coping with the challenges of childhood. A hand-selected panel of experts ranging from dentists to psychologists provide scholarly advice. But, crucially, there are hundreds of top tips and suggestions from other mums - the members of netmums.com, the rapidly-growing online community of mothers sharing valuable information on all aspects of childcare. It's real advice for real women, and is guaranteed to put the fun back into family life.

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Peat Smoke and Spirit

Andrew Jefford
Authors:
Andrew Jefford

Andrew Jefford

Andrew Jefford was the drink correspondent of the Evening Standard, and is a regular broadcaster on the BBC and the author of many acclaimed books. He has won eight Glenfiddich Awards and various other honours for his writing, while his last book, THE NEW FRANCE, won both the Andre Simon and Lanson prizes.

Ian Buxton

Ian Buxton worked in the drinks industry for more thany 30 years as a writer, commentator and consultant, Marketing Director of a world-leading single malt, and accidental owner of a derelict distillery. His distinctive style and deep industry knowledge offer unique insights into the world of whisky, recognised by the award of Keeper of the Quaich (1991, the highest accolade in Scotch) and as one of the few writers inducted into London's ancient fraternity, the Worshipful Company of Distillers. Ian's whisky books have been translated into eight languages.

By Ian Buxton

Legendary Winter Warmers

Author of 101 LEGENDARY WHISKIES, Ian Buxton, tells us his favourite winter tipples

THE HEIST

Our ebook of the month is THE HEIST, the first adventure in an electrifying new series from Janet Evanovich and Lee Goldberg.

The perfect place to write a novel

Blog: The Writing Shed

What's your commute like? Mine's not so bad. Out the back door, across the deck, down the steps, skip across the lawn on the railway sleeper stepping stones and I'm there. My name is Julia Crouch and I am a shed worker. About ten years ago, I was running a very busy graphic design/illustration business from one end of the attic bedroom I share with my actor husband. When he was home from tour he tended to work there too, writing plays in our bed at the other end. With three kids crammed into our tiny terraced house, there was nowhere else for us to go. But our bedroom was hardly a sanctuary from our busy lives. Instead it was a major part of it all. I had two desks in it (one for computer and gear, the other for dirty work - paint/pencil/charcoal/collage), an A3 printer and a giant plan chest. Every available surface was taken up with bits of paper, books and various other sorts of equipment. And then, from time to time, Tim was there, too, with all his work stuff as well. Something had to give. So, when I had a particularly good year, I decided to invest some of my profits in building a garden studio. I bought it from a company that specialises in what they call 'huts'. All we had to do was make a level concrete base and run out the electrics and, within a couple of days, the prefabricated office was up and standing, ready for me to move all my gear out of the house and down to the bottom of our small garden. With this quiet, leafy retreat, I found that not only had I bought myself actual space, I had also secured a place where my imagination could grow and flourish. Having been with my husband since we were at university, it was the first time since childhood that I had had a room all to myself. I furnished it exactly as I wanted, filling it only with things I wanted to be there. It was, quite literally, a room of my own, kept as tidy or as messy as I feel like, removed from the domestic pressures and distractions of the house and children, yet close enough to be present in case of disaster or need. It was precisely because of all this physical and mental space that, about six years ago, I started to write in earnest. I'd do my money-earning work, then, every day, I'd stay down in the shed and work for an hour or so on short stories and, later, my novels. When I got my book deal with Headline, I happily and quickly gave up the day job, then instantly set about reconfiguring my shed. The plan chest was exchanged with an artist friend for a woodcut and the dirty work table went off to Freecycle. The liberated space now houses a cushion-covered day bed. This is where I read and dream stuff up, although I generally have to write at my desk in my fancy back-friendly chair. I've got some great wireless speakers down here now, so I can fill the space with the background music I've found helps the words out like nothing else. The walls around my desk are decorated with a mixture of artworks and ephemera relating to my current work in progress – currently lots of Greek stuff, because my fourth novel is partly set on the island of Ikaria. And behind me there is a whole wall of books – novels to be read, research items, reference books and writing books. I do about eighty per cent of my writing down here now. Although I have a heater and the shed is well insulated, sometimes, when the weather is really freezing, I prefer to curl up in front of the living room woodburner to work. Other times I need a change of scene just to chivvy things along, so I go out and work in one of the many great little cafés we have here in Brighton. But, on a day like this, when the sun is bright, and the birds are doing their spring thing, there's nowhere better. I have the doors and windows open, paperweights holding everything down against the breeze, my two cats sleep in a spot of sunlight on the day bed, and Nick Cave sings God is in the House on the speakers. What more can a writer girl want, really?

TOUCH AND GO

The Sunday Times top ten bestseller Lisa Gardner's latest thriller, TOUCH AND GO, is out now in paperback. Here's an exclusive look at chapter one to whet your appetite...

Posted by Headline authors

Beat those January blues...

Emma Hannigan, author of THE SUMMMER GUEST and THE HEART OF WINTER : I would like to take this opportunity to wish all readers a very happy and healthy new year. As a nine times cancer survivor I am incredibly grateful to have the opportunity to embrace the next twelve months. I am so excited about my new book The Secrets We Share and I sincerely hope you will all enjoy it. May 2015 bring sunshine to your hearts and sparkles to your souls. Love and light, Emma Stephen Lloyd Jones, author of THE STRING DIARIES and WRITTEN IN THE BLOOD : Key challenges this year are to stop swearing so much and learn to play by ear Chopin's ‘Nocturne’ in E Flat Major (Op. 9, No. 2). Pretty tough, those two, especially in combination. Jill Mansell, author of THE UNPREDICTABLE CONSEQUENCES OF LOVE and THREE AMAZING THINGS ABOUT YOU: Jill Mansell's New Year's Resolution. (To become a hare...) I spend my life envying other people for all sorts of reasons: that they are tall and thin... that they genuinely love exercise and aren't afraid to do it... that they have elegance and style and can travel long distances without getting all flustered and panicky... But nothing - NOTHING - inspires more envy than when I hear fellow writers say casually on social media, 'There, have just written five thousand words in two hours. Now off to have lunch with friends, followed by an afternoon of shopping - time for some fun!' Because they are hares and I am the tortoise. While they're out, gaily raising their Champagne glasses to each other and celebrating another sparkling chapter of their novel effortlessly done and dusted, I'm left at home like Cinderella, plodding my way through the next five hundred words, which will take me all day to write. So this is my resolution for 2015: I am going to stop procrastinating and endlessly distracting myself and whingeing to other people on Twitter that my writing is going so slowly. Instead I'm going to sit down and concentrate, and just get on and do it until it's done. Jo Thomas, author of THE OYSTER CATCHER : To be honest, I find it very hard to give anything up. If someone tells me I can't have it, I want it more! So I plan to do more of certain things. Eat more fruit. Walk more, because it's such good thinking time when I’m writing. The characters just start chatting amongst themselves and it's a great way to set myself up for a day’s work. And reading, of course. I love reading and I seem to end up squeezing in a bit of reading time at the end of the day before falling asleep. So I'm giving myself permission in 2015 to read more and enjoy! Paul Fraser Collard, author of THE DEVIL'S ASSASSIN and JACK LARK: ROGUE : 1) Learn how to use a semicolon properly. Word tells me that I need to consider revising the ones I do use and who am I to ignore such wise advice. 2) Accept that I have more than a few rogue grey hairs. Just For Men is no longer a viable option. 3) On at least one occasion prove to my sixteen-year-old son that I do really know better than he does. 4) Stop trying to convince my family that Opal Fruits (yes, Opal Fruits, not Starburst) count as one of my five-a-day. 5) Stop checking my Amazon sales ranking. No more. Never again. Or at least, not more than once or twice a day. Sarah Hilary, author of SOMEONE ELSE'S SKIN and NO OTHER DARKNESS : Every January, I arm myself with fresh Moleskine notebooks and pens, and with books and DVDs to stimulate my curiosity. As I get to work on book three, this year's arsenal includes Explore Everything by Bradley L. Garrett, Paranoia by Freeman and Freeman, and box-sets of True Detective, and The Mentalist. My chief resolutions (the same every year): to bury the past, and to live (and write) in the moment. Sierra Kincade, author of THE MASSEUSE and THE DISTRACTION : I resolve to live the kind of life that inspires me to write more books. Wait... I write naughty books. I mean, live a more adventurous life (in the bedroom). Wait. I mean, just get out of the house more. (Now that sounds even naughtier!) Sigh. I resolve to write more books. I resolve to eat more cake and feel less guilty. I also resolve to cry tears of pain at the gym following said cake. And I resolve to invest in a chocolate IV which will keep me blissfully caffeinated. And if that doesn't work, I resolve to just stay blissfully caffeinated. 2015 is going to be a great year. Barbara Nadel, author of BODY COUNT and LAND OF THE BLIND : In 2015 I've said I will say goodbye to some of my self-doubt – can't say goodbye to all of it or I won't be neurotic any more. But I will be asking for more. I want to have more fun with friends or chocolate or, preferably both. I'm only giving up celery. Professionally, I want to do a lot more publicity and public-speaking work and I want to write ever more challenging books. Apart from that, just world peace, more money for the NHS, and more public tolerance of eccentricity. If a woman wants to lie in her own bath in a wedding dress, that really is her business. And we should respect that. Nicola Doherty, author of IF I COULD TURN BACK TIME and the GIRLS ON TOUR series: Hello. My name is Nicola and I’m a New Year’s Resolution addict. I’ve made the same resolutions for probably the past five years. They tend to include running more, eating less sugar, lifting weights, doing more yoga, watching less TV and … flossing. This last one became so popular among my friends a few years ago that we joked about substituting flossing for drinks as a social engagement. (I also gave up alcohol for January once, but not any more: if there’s one month where you NEED a drink, it’s January). This year, I’m doing a slight variation on the usual. Inspired by this website, I looked at why my previous resolutions failed, and built in contingency plans. I’ve signed up for a half marathon on 22 March, so that I HAVE to run. I realised that the reason I never kept up my weights before is that it’s so boring. So I’ve started having a little flash disco at home every afternoon for ten minutes, just dancing with my weights aloft like Jane Fonda. Obviously I look nuts but I’m dancing on my own so it’s fine. And – most importantly – I’m marking every successful day in my calendar. Seven days in, it’s working – just seeing that tick on the calendar is enough to make me do it. It’s a pity I didn’t think of this five years ago, but there you go. People who love making resolutions don’t understand people who don’t. In my next book Girls on Tour, Maggie and Rachel get together for a ‘friendship date’ after first meeting on a skiing holiday. The date is very awkward and stilted initially – until the girls realise that they share a love of New Year’s resolutions and bond over their relentless drive for self-improvement. Maggie and Rachel both end up breaking most of their resolutions – except two: they’ve both resolved to make new friends and to travel more. And they do! Another thing I’ve learned: positive and fun resolutions are always easier to keep … Of course New Year’s Resolutions don’t always work. Otherwise we’d all be thin, fit, decluttered and fluent in Mandarin. But they still hold out a glittering promise – that one day we’ll overcome our limitations and become better, healthier, more productive versions of ourselves. I’m optimistic by nature, so I’ll continue to make my resolutions. And even if they just end up giving me a slightly healthier January, what’s wrong with that? Steven Dunne, author of THE UNQUIET GRAVE and A KILLING MOON : At my age the only important New Year's Resolution is to get healthier and stay that way. Less booze, less food and more exercise, the latter especially problematic for a writer. Career-wise it's simple. With A Killing Moon in 2015 I want to reach new readers and, in so doing, open up my previous novels for discovery to thriller lovers everywhere. Happy and healthy New Year to everyone.