Related to: 'At the Coalface'

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Adrian Slywotzky With Karl Web, Er
Authors:
Adrian Slywotzky With Karl Web, Er

Alexander Waugh

Alexander Waugh is the grandson of Evelyn Waugh and son of columnist Auberon Waugh and novelist Teresa Waugh. The former chief Opera Critic at both the Mail on Sunday and the London Evening Standard, he is also a publisher (Travelman Publishing), cartoonist and award-winning composer.

Amy Molloy

Amy Molloy is 24 years old and, since graduating with a journalism degree in 2007, has worked for various magazines in London and Dublin. She is currently the features assistant at the Daily Mail's Weekend magazine.

Anthony Loyd

Anthony Loyd is an award-winning special correspondent for THE TIMES. A former army officer, he served in Northern Ireland and the first Gulf war, then left the army in 1991. At the start of 1993 he hitchhiked to Bosnia, living there throughout the war until 1996. His critically acclaimed book, MY WAR GONE BY, I MISS IT SO, was the result of his experiences there and parallel battles with heroin addiction. He has subsequently worked in numerous conflict zones including Iraq, Afghanistan, Kosovo, Chechnya, Ethiopia, Algeria and Sierre Leone. In addition to THE TIMES, his stories have been published in the NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE, ESQUIRE, GQ, ARENA, the SUNDAY TIMES and the SUNDAY TELEGRAPH. Twice commended for his work in the British Press Awards, he was also nominated Foreign Freelancer of the Year in 1994 for his coverage in Bosnia. In 2001 he was voted Foreign Correspondent of the Year for his work in Afghanistan post-September 11th.

Betty Herbert

Betty Herbert lives by the sea with her husband and much-adored cat, Bob. In real life, she's been a PA, a marketing consultant, a teacher, a writing tutor, a cultural producer and a director of a literary festival that never quite happened. She likes sea-swimming, cocktails, Stevie Wonder, swallows and holidaying in Devon.

Carol Vorderman

Born in 1960, Carol grew up in North Wales with her sister, brother and her beloved mum, Jean. She went to the University of Cambridge at just seventeen. Since childhood, Carol has had a passion for everything mathematical and her skill with numbers secured her a role on Countdown in 1982, the show that cemented her position as one of the most successful and popular female presenters in British TV history. Awarded an MBE in 2000, she has now turned her attention to maths education. Carol lives in Bristol with her children.

Caspar Walsh

Caspar Walsh is a regular writer for BBC Radio 4, with broadcasts including the sixties gangster story Vincent Vice's Rainbow. The Prison Father, a critically acclaimed feature length docudrama, and the young offender docudrama, Inside Out, were based on his prison life experience. As a workshop facilitator in and out of prisons, he helps fathers and their families to rehabilitate by using his own experiences as an inspiration.

Catherine Paton Black

Catherine Paton was born in Hamilton, Lanarkshire in 1946, and married Doug Black when she was nineteen. Doug became a coal miner in 1974, working at Bevercotes pit for the next decade. After becoming a mum to five children, Catherine joined Bevercotes colliery herself, working in the canteen. During the great strike in 1984, Catherine was one of the few female official picketers when she joined her husband in the fight to stop the pit closing under the Tories.

Claire Bidwell Smith

Claire Bidwell Smith lives in Los Angeles with her husband and daughter. She is an experienced therapist specializing in grief. Claire has written for many publications including Time Out New York, Yoga Journal, BlackBook Magazine, The Huffington Post and Chicago Public Radio.Claire has a bachelor's degree from The New School University in Manhattan and a master's degree in clinical psychology from Antioch University in Los Angeles. She has worked for numerous publications and also for nonprofits like Dave Eggers' literacy center 826LA. She most recently worked as a bereavement counselor for a hospice in Chicago.

Craig Nelson

Craig Nelson, when he isn't trekking around the world, can be found in the jungle of New York City, where he is one of publishing's most recognized - and vaccinated - figures. He has spent time in locales ranging from the Amazon to the Yucatan Peninsula and plans on making Zanzibar his next trip, if only to round out the alphabet.

Esther Rantzen

Esther Rantzen made her name producing and presenting the long-running BBC series That's Life, and since then has made a number of pioneering programmes on subjects such as childbirth, mental health and child abuse. She is President of Childline, which she founded in 1986, and a trustee of the NSPCC, as well as a Patron of a number of other charities. She was married to Desmond Wilcox until his death in 2000.

Gary Sutherland

Gary Sutherland is a journalist who has written for, among others, the BBC, Scotland on Sunday and the Sunday Times. He is married with a son and a daughter.

Geraint Anderson

Before sacrificing his soul to dark forces in the Square Mile, Cityboy was a genuine left-wing hippy and political activist, complete with ponytail and hoop earrings. His dream of becoming a global traveller was cruelly dashed when his brother got him an interview at a French bank in the City, which would set him on the rocky road to destruction and despair.

Jeffrey Steingarten

Jeffrey Steingarten trained to become a food writer at Harvard College, Harvard Law School, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Harvard Lampoon. He is the internationally feared and acclaimed food critic of American Vogue.

John Lewis-Stempel

John Lewis-Stempel is the author and editor of numerous previous books including England: The Autobiography and Eye-witness D-Day. He lives on a farm in Herefordshire with his wife and two children.

John Prescott

The son of a railway signalman, John Prescott failed his 11-plus exam and became a steward in the Merchant Navy. He went on to attend Ruskin College, Oxford and then Hull University where he obtained a degree in economics and economic history. He was elected to Parliament in 1970 as MP for Hull East. Following the death of John Smith in 1994 he became deputy leader of the Labour party in the first leadership election under the 'one member, one vote' system he had passionately advocated at the 1993 Labour conference. Following Labour's election victory in 1997, Prescott was appointed deputy prime minister, a position he held until his retirement from the job in June 2007.

Laura Thompson

A writer and freelance journalist, Laura Thompson won the Somerset Maugham award for her first book, THE DOGS, and is also the author of the critically acclaimed biographies of Agatha Christie and Nancy Mitford.

Lily Koppel

Lily Koppel is the bestselling author of The Red Leather Diary: Reclaiming a Life Through the Pages of a Lost Journal. She writes for the New York Times, and her work has appeared in the New York Times Magazine, the New York Times Book Review, the Huffington Post and Glamour.

Maggie Mccune

Maggie McCune was born in Quetta, India, in 1942. Having attended boarding school in England she returned to India in 1962 where she met and married her husband; the family then came back to live in North Yorkshire. Maggie's career, apart from bringing up her four children single-handedly, has included a variety of jobs in schools, a fine art auctioneer and a publishing house.

Mary Quant

Mary Quant is a renowned British fashion designer and style icon, whose innovative designs shaped the sixties. Mary received an OBE for her outstanding contributions to the fashion industry, and she turned the miniskirt into a worldwide sensation.