Related to: 'Desires of the Dead'

September Book of the Month

WHEN I'M WITH YOU - EXCERPT

A sizzling excerpt from When I'm With You, Book 2 in Beth Kery's captivating Because You Are Mine series.

Headline

Honey & Co: The Baking Book

Itamar Srulovich, Sarit Packer
Authors:
Itamar Srulovich, Sarit Packer

Our day is marked by what comes out of the pastry section, and there's always something good on the way: sticky buns full of cherries and pistachios in the morning; a loaf of rich dough rolled with chocolate, hazelnuts and cinnamon that has been proving since dawn and comes out of the oven fresh for elevenses. Lunch is a crisp, crumbly shell of pastry filled with spiced lamb or burnt aubergine, and at teatime there are cheesecakes and fruit cakes, small cakes and massive cookies - so many cakes that it's hard to choose one. (There's no need to worry, whatever you choose will be great!) After dinner there might be poached peaches with roses or something more traditional, sweet and salty Knafe drenched in orange blossom syrup, or maybe just a small piece of fresh marzipan. There's something sweet, something in the oven for everyone, all day long - welcome to Honey & Co.Chapters include:How to be good at baking: general notes; Store cupboard; Sweet & savoury breakfasts; Elevenses; Lunch; Teatime; Traditional desserts

Headline

Dead Silence

Kimberly Derting
Authors:
Kimberly Derting

All her life Violet has grappled with her ability to sense the echoes of those who have been murdered and the matching imprint that clings to their killers. Now that she has an imprint of her own, Violet's 'gift' is intolerable. Torn between her desire to lead a normal life and the pressure from the Center to continue her work tracking down killers, Violet's world starts to unravel...and some of her most carefully guarded secrets are exposed.When she learns that an underground group has been carrying out murders on the orders of their Charles Manson-like leader, Violet is pulled into one final deadly hunt...where her ability may not even be able to save her.

Headline

The Last Echo

Kimberly Derting
Authors:
Kimberly Derting
Headline

The Last Echo

Kimberly Derting
Authors:
Kimberly Derting
Business Plus

Demand (India Only)

Adrian Slywotzky With Karl Web, Er
Authors:
Adrian Slywotzky With Karl Web, Er
Headline

I Don't Want To Kill You

Dan Wells
Authors:
Dan Wells
Headline

The Body Finder

Kimberly Derting
Authors:
Kimberly Derting

Violet Ambrose is grappling with two major issues: Jay Heaton and her morbid secret ability. While the sixteen-year-old is confused by her new feelings for her best friend, she is more disturbed by her "power" to sense dead bodies - or at least those that have been murdered. Since she was a little girl, she has felt the echoes the dead leave behind in the world...and the imprints that attach to their killers.Violet has never considered her strange talent to be a gift, but now that a serial killer is terrorizing her small town Violet realizes she might be the only person who can stop him.Despite his fierce protectiveness over her, Jay reluctantly agrees to help Violet find the murderer - and Violet is unnerved by her hope that Jay's intentions are much more than friendly. But even as she's falling in love, Violet is getting closer to discovering a killer...and becoming his prey herself.

Headline

The Body Finder

Kimberly Derting
Authors:
Kimberly Derting

Violet Ambrose is grappling with two major issues: Jay Heaton and her morbid secret ability. While the sixteen-year-old is confused by her new feelings for her best friend, she is more disturbed by her "power" to sense dead bodies - or at least those that have been murdered. Since she was a little girl, she has felt the echoes the dead leave behind in the world...and the imprints that attach to their killers.Violet has never considered her strange talent to be a gift, but now that a serial killer is terrorizing her small town Violet realizes she might be the only person who can stop him.Despite his fierce protectiveness over her, Jay reluctantly agrees to help Violet find the murderer - and Violet is unnerved by her hope that Jay's intentions are much more than friendly. But even as she's falling in love, Violet is getting closer to discovering a killer...and becoming his prey herself.

Headline

Four Blind Mice

James Patterson
Authors:
James Patterson
Headline

4th of July

James Patterson, Maxine Paetro
Authors:
James Patterson, Maxine Paetro
Headline

I Am Not A Serial Killer: Now a major film

Dan Wells
Authors:
Dan Wells

I Am Not A Serial Killer is now a major film starring Christopher Lloyd and Max Records. This is the first title in the thrillingly dark John Wayne Carver series.John works in his family's mortuary and has an obsession with serial killers. He wants to be a good person, but fears he is a sociopath, and for years he has suppressed his dark side through a strict system of rules designed to mimic 'normal' behavior. Then a demon begins stalking his small town and killing people one by one, and John is forced to give in to his darker nature in order to save them. As he struggles to understand the demon and find a way to kill it, his own mind begins to unravel until he fears he may never regain control. Faced with the reality that he is, perhaps, more monstrous than the monster he is fighting, John must make a final stand against the horrors of both the demon and himself.

Dan Wells

Dan Wells has a Bachelors in English from Brigham Young University where he was the editor of The Leading Edge Magazine. He now runs www.timewastersguide.com.

James Patterson

James Patterson is one of the best-known and biggest-selling writers of all time. Since winning the EdgarT Award for Best First Novel with The Thomas Berryman Number, his books have sold in excess of 300 million copies worldwide and he has been the most borrowed author in UK libraries for the past eight years in a row. He is the author of some of the most popular series of the past two decades - the Alex Cross, Women's Murder Club, Detective Michael Bennett and Private novels - and he has written many other number one bestsellers including romance novels and stand-alone thrillers. He lives in Florida with his wife and son. James is passionate about encouraging children to read. Inspired by his own son who was a reluctant reader, he also writes a range of books specifically for young readers. James is a founding partner of Booktrust's Children's Reading Fund in the UK.

Kimberly Derting

Kimberly Derting is a full-time writer who lives in Western Washington state with her husband and three children.

CHAPTER SAMPLER

ebook of the month

An exclusive extract featuring New York Times bestseller John Lescroart's most popular character, lawyer Dismas Hardy, in his most personal case so far.

TOUCH AND GO

The Sunday Times top ten bestseller Lisa Gardner's latest thriller, TOUCH AND GO, is out now in paperback. Here's an exclusive look at chapter one to whet your appetite...

The Headliners' Verdict...

Blog: The Man Booker Prize 2012

Bringing Up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel It was love at first sight. Our romance started this summer in Wolf Hall, where Thomas Cromwell and I were first acquainted. At first I was unsure of him: he grew up on the wrong side of the tracks, had a penchant for loose women and was quick to swing a sword around. However, after a brief spell abroad Cromwell reinvented himself, and I swiftly fell head over heels for the most complex fictional character I have ever come across. He is man of contradictions, conflicting passions and sometimes less than altruistic motives. In Bringing Up the Bodies, we see a darker side of Cromwell but he is just as compelling to watch in action. He has achieved the ultimate position of power, but at what price, and how long will he sit at Henry VIII’s side? Mantel’s series is dazzling, noisy, crowded, rich, bloody and brilliant. The fact that my review has basically consisted of me banging on about her main character as if he were a real person is testament to her skill as a storyteller – and her ability to breathe new life into a historical period which has been much represented. I will be cheering on for her and Cromwell come Booker Night. Bring it! Sam Eades, Publicity Umbrella by Will Self Will Self’s first novel is a paragraph-free stream-of-consciousness affair, with a perplexing smattering of italics. Challenging – yes. And I like a challenge. The problem is – and perhaps this is some self-indulgent weakness on my part as a reader – I’m the sort that likes to be rewarded for it, too. I love Ulysses. Perhaps I didn’t discover this until I read it through for the second time, when I began to appreciate its rhythms, its many personalities, its celebration of the complex, surreal, heterogeneous nature of human experience. And I loved it because of its audaciousness: breaking new literary ground, becoming, of course, a byword for Modernist experimentation in form. And I think that was my beef with Umbrella. I hesitate to say that all fiction must have a point, but, in a sense, perhaps it should. It should, in some way, contribute to or challenge our understanding of ourselves and of the world in which we live. And I’m afraid I didn’t feel that Umbrella was making any such contribution. It felt, instead, like a kind of literary historical re-enactment. Joyce was smashing preconceptions of what a novel should be, putting up two fingers to the form that had, in one way of another, persisted for several centuries. Will Self, meanwhile, is aping Joyce – a writer who did the same thing, only far better, almost a century ago. Lucy Foley, Editorial Swimming Home by Deborah Levy Coming in at under 200 pages, this is the skinniest book on the shortlist, but one that packs a significant punch. It’s the story of some family friends whose villa holiday in the South of France is disturbed when they find a naked woman swimming in the pool. It turns out to be an unstable young woman called Kitty, who believes she has a special connection to a member of the party, Joe, a famous poet. Levy is brilliant on atmosphere and from the moment Kitty emerges from that pool, you sense that any equilibrium that existed between the characters assembled at this villa has been irreversibly disturbed, to be replaced by an uneasiness that pervades the entire novel. Levy’s writing is super sharp and taut; every sentence is charged and every scene is loaded. The end result is massively compelling and hugely unsettling; this is a novel that leaves a strange taste in your mouth, in the very best way. Leah Woodburn, Editorial The Lighthouse by Alison Moore ‘The Honeymoon was dreadful – they had delayed fights and lost luggage, twin beds and upset stomachs, bad weather and arguments.’ A bleak tale of a man’s continual attempts to explain the tragedy of his past – from his mother’s abandonment to his wife leaving him after yet another betrayal. The protagonist, Futh, leaves for Germany in an attempt to escape his demons. But by stumbling into the paths of an unhappily married couple running the hotel in Hallhaus, his fate is sealed as soon as he unwittingly adds to their misery. Alison Moore’s skill is to keep the tension high in what is an otherwise immensely depressing story. Richard Roper, Editorial The Garden of Evening Mists by Tan Twan Eng This novel was a pleasure to read. Tan Twan Eng’s writing style is so calming, despite at times describing the horrors of life in a slave labour camp for our protagonist, Teoh Yun Ling. She is a fascinating character, soul survivor of a prisoner-of-war camp who becomes a judge, prosecuting war criminals and terrorists both to seek justice for the tortures she endured and to find out more information about the camp. The novel is split between the present day, where she has recently retired and is reconnecting with old friends in Malaya and 1951, when she first starts out as prosecutor and is forced to face her demons and seek out Aritomo, ‘a man who had been the gardener of the Emperor of Japan’ to ask him to build a garden for her sister who did not survive the camp. Both characters are unapologetic of their feelings and beliefs regarding the hostilities but Aritomo agrees to teach Yun Ling the art of Japanese gardening so she can build the garden herself. It is full of cultural and historical complexities that do echo other books that I’ve read but there are some fascinating concepts unearthed, which I absolutely relished. Laura Skerritt, Creative and Marketing Narcopolis by Jeet Thayil I’d heard good things about this unusual, opium-soaked tome, and was pleased to find it as eccentric, vibrant and narcotically stimulating as I’d been led to expect. I’ve always been intrigued by portraits of drug addiction (Melvin Burgess’ Junk, anyone?!), and Thayil paints a disturbing but charged portrait of a group of people enslaved by opium, and their slow descent into hallucinatory madness. And through the opium smoke is an evocation of the chaotic city of Bombay and the quirky, diverse people who populate it. I’d recommend this for anyone who wants something different – or a reading experience which is the literary equivalent to meandering through an opium-induced dreamworld. Emily Kitchin, Editorial

CHAPTER SAMPLER

eBook of Month

Evil will follow you… Wherever you go. Can you find a way to hide? If you like Karen Rose, Katia Lief or Mary Burton you’ll love Debra Webb’s bestselling Faces of Evil series. Click below to read the first chapter of the third instalment, POWER, published for the first time in the UK this month.

POWER by Debra Webb

eBook of the month

Evil will follow you… Wherever you go. Can you find a way to hide? If you like Karen Rose, Katia Lief or Mary Burton you’ll love Debra Webb’s bestselling Faces of Evil series. Click below to read the first chapter of the third instalment, POWER, published for the first time in the UK this month.

Posted by Suzanne Johnson, Author

Blog: Rewriting History, from Pirates to Voodoo Queens

One of the great things about writing a series set in New Orleans is the chance to put the city’s amazing history and culture to use. I mean, why set a series in New Orleans if it could just as easily be set in Kansas City or Atlanta or Dallas? I like to see a book use its setting as another character. I wanted to do justice to my hometown, so I came up with a new species to go along with my wizards, shapeshifters, mermen, and loup-garou. The Historical Undead are famous humans given physical immortality by the magic of human memory. As long as a person is remembered, his name spoken, his history studied – he can cross over from the world Beyond and (since Hurricane Katrina tore down the barriers between worlds) walk among us, looking like any other human. Which can be a problem when the most famous New Orleanians of all are sometimes also the most infamous. I mean, it’s kind of cool that the trumpet player down on the corner who looks kind of familiar might be the real Louis Armstrong, visiting from the Beyond. But that tall, dark-haired woman with the headscarf and big gold earrings? Can you prove she isn’t the real voodoo priestess Marie Laveau? Do you want to tangle with her to find out? And is that a dead rooster she’s carrying? But the most famous member of the Historical Undead in New Orleans is the early nineteenth-century pirate Jean Lafitte. French-born, tall, by all accounts handsome and wicked-smart, Lafitte ruled as many as a thousand pirates and ruffians from his kingdom of Barataria, in the swamps and bayous south of New Orleans. When I decided to write Armstrong, Laveau, and Lafitte into the series, I came upon the issue of reality versus fantasy. Sure, these are the 'Historical Undead,' but I wanted to take the 'historical' part seriously. So I read an autobiography of Louis Armstrong to get a feel for his voice, listened to a lot of his music, studied his wardrobe. With Marie Laveau, I tried to not only read some historical accounts, but also look at newspaper stories from her time to get a feel for what she might look like, her demeanor, how she might talk. And then there’s Jean Lafitte, New Orleans most famous, and most romanticized, citizen. I initially wrote the privateer (he didn’t like being called a pirate, as that was a hanging offense in his day) as a one-scene guy in a scrap with my heroine DJ, who’s a wizard. But a funny thing happened on my way to do a little research on 'Le Capitain.' He won me over. I brought him back for a second scene. Then a third, and a fourth. I read biographies, historical documents written by Lafitte himself, accounts both positive and negative. One of the great things about writing a series set in New Orleans is the chance to put the city’s amazing history and culture to use. I mean, why set a series in New Orleans if it could just as easily be set in Kansas City or Atlanta or Dallas? I like to see a book use its setting as another character. I wanted to do justice to my hometown, so I came up with a new species to go along with my wizards, shapeshifters, mermen, and loup-garou. The Historical Undead are famous humans given physical immortality by the magic of human memory. As long as a person is remembered, his name spoken, his history studied – he can cross over from the world Beyond and (since Hurricane Katrina tore down the barriers between worlds) walk among us, looking like any other human. Which can be a problem when the most famous New Orleanians of all are sometimes also the most infamous. I mean, it’s kind of cool that the trumpet player down on the corner who looks kind of familiar might be the real Louis Armstrong, visiting from the Beyond. But that tall, dark-haired woman with the headscarf and big gold earrings? Can you prove she isn’t the real voodoo priestess Marie Laveau? Do you want to tangle with her to find out? And is that a dead rooster she’s carrying? But the most famous member of the Historical Undead in New Orleans is the early nineteenth-century pirate Jean Lafitte. French-born, tall, by all accounts handsome and wicked-smart, Lafitte ruled as many as a thousand pirates and ruffians from his kingdom of Barataria, in the swamps and bayous south of New Orleans. When I decided to write Armstrong, Laveau, and Lafitte into the series, I came upon the issue of reality versus fantasy. Sure, these are the 'Historical Undead,' but I wanted to take the 'historical' part seriously. So I read an autobiography of Louis Armstrong to get a feel for his voice, listened to a lot of his music, studied his wardrobe. With Marie Laveau, I tried to not only read some historical accounts, but also look at newspaper stories from her time to get a feel for what she might look like, her demeanor, how she might talk. And then there’s Jean Lafitte, New Orleans most famous, and most romanticized, citizen. I initially wrote the privateer (he didn’t like being called a pirate, as that was a hanging offense in his day) as a one-scene guy in a scrap with my heroine DJ, who’s a wizard. But a funny thing happened on my way to do a little research on 'Le Capitain.' He won me over. I brought him back for a second scene. Then a third, and a fourth. I read biographies, historical documents written by Lafitte himself, accounts both positive and negative. In River Road, I gave in and let Jean Lafitte have his way with me… er, I mean become a major series character. In the new book, Elysian Fields, he has settled into a character that I believe reflects what the real Lafitte might be had he encountered the modern world. He’s practical and yet a dreamer; almost courtly in his manners, but brutal if needed; quick to anger but quick to forgive when it benefits him; more than a tad narcissistic; wicked-smart. How accurate is my physical depiction of Lafitte? I can’t be sure, of course. Biographers agree he was about 6-2, extremely tall for the very early 1800s. He was 'well formed,' which I translate as 'ripped.' He had dark hair, biographers agreed, and was fair of complexion. He spoke English, Spanish, and Italian, although his first language was French. He was charming, extremely intelligent, charismatic – and lethal. There’s a disagreement on eye color – some say dark blue, some hazel, one even claimed they were violet. So I picked dark blue. Then accuracy gets dicey, of course, because Jean Lafitte never had access to automobiles, electricity, or telephones. Yet he’s entrepreneurial and smart enough that I think he’d adjust. He despairs at DJ’s wardrobe and the fact that she calls her self DJ instead of Drusilla Jane (“those are letters, not a name,” he says). And her use of slang often leads to confusion: He stepped back and smiled. 'You look magnificent, Jolie. More beautiful than even I realized.' God help me, I blushed. Again. 'You look kinda hot yourself.' He frowned and looked down at his clothing. 'But I am quite comfortable. Why would you believe I was hot?' Oh yeah, he’s hot. Elysian Fields, the third book in the thriling Sentinels of New Orleans series is out now, in trade paperback and ebook.