Related to: 'The Water Book'

R&R

Editor's Letter

Welcome to Relax & Read, a place specially designed to give you some precious R & R time. Allow us to make your search for the perfect read as easy as 1, 2, 3. Simply choose a feature, depending on your mood. Every time you visit this site, you'll find something here that isn't available anywhere else - exclusive first chapters and 'behind the scenes' footage, hot recommendations and fascinating interviews. It's a place where you can get up close and personal with the authors of your choice – a bit like having them in your own home. So make some coffee, sit back and enjoy some R & R...

Tinder Press

The Last Wilderness

Neil Ansell
Authors:
Neil Ansell
Wildfire

Apollo

Zack Scott
Authors:
Zack Scott

Explore the iconic Apollo space missions and moon landings through these stunning infographics and data visualisations. If you like space, this book is for you.The Apollo Program ran from 1961 until 1972, and marks one of the greatest accomplishments in all of human endeavour - man walking on the moon. On 20th July 1969, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin achieved this most remarkable feat, becoming the first humans to visit another celestial body.Apollo is an extraordinary visual history of the story of this iconic space programme, based on recently released NASA data about the various missions of that name. Using beautifully designed infographics, Apollo takes us through all the astonishing facts and figures, as well as some quirky little-known details, and gives us a detailed and elegant history of the seventeen missions which saw twelve humans step on the surface of the moon. Apollo gives us an insight in to the incredible individuals who made that journey.

Headline

The Wasp That Brainwashed the Caterpillar

Matt Simon
Authors:
Matt Simon

For fans of WHAT IF? and NEW SCIENTIST comes Matt Simon's THE WASP THAT BRAINWASHED THE CATERPILLAR, a brilliantly funny and informative look at the stranger side of evolution.Featuring:The Zombie ants mind-controlled by a fungusBeautiful salamanders that can regenerate any part of their bodies, including their brainsThe mantis shrimp, which fires its club-like appendage so fast that the surrounding water becomes as hot as the surface of the sunThe Antechinus, whose runaway testosterone levels cause them to have so much sex during their three-week mating season that they bleed internally, go blind, and drop dead...Featuring quirky illustrations and the signature blend of science smarts and humour that make Matt Simon's Wired column so entertaining, this is an ideal stocking-filler for every popular science aficionado...

Headline

The Human Age

Diane Ackerman
Authors:
Diane Ackerman
Headline

Smashing Physics

Jon Butterworth
Authors:
Jon Butterworth
Headline

Spiral

Paul Mceuen
Authors:
Paul Mceuen

The first bio-tech thriller from acclaimed Cornell professor, Paul McEuen, the new Michael Crichton.Pacific Ocean 1946: Liam Connor of the British Army, a global expert on germ warfare, is sent to help the US Navy foil an attempt by a Japanese submarine to unleash the world's first biological super-weapon. Code-name: Uzumaki. Translation: Spiral. The devastating decision is made to annihilate Spiral by releasing the world's fourth atomic bomb, obliterating the weapon before it can release its catastrophic payload.New York, present day: Connor, now a world-renowned Nobel prize-winner working on the cutting edge of nano-science technology, prayed that the spectre of Spiral would never return. But now it is back and the stakes are exponentially higher. Spiral would be virtually unstoppable with current technological advances and only Connor holds the key to its cure. Those who seek Spiral will stop at nothing to obtain Connor's knowledge, even if it means his death and that of everyone he holds dear. As the race begins for Spiral, will the world survive the Doomsday scenario about to unfold?

Headline

The Dogs of Windcutter Down

David Kennard
Authors:
David Kennard
Headline Review

The Philosophy Gym

Stephen Law
Authors:
Stephen Law

Where did the universe come from? Is time travel possible? Are genetically designed babies morally acceptable? If you have ever asked yourself such questions, then you have already begun to think philosophically. This book is for those who want to take the next step. Stephen Law poses questions about some of the most important philosophical issues of today - and of yesterday. Light-hearted questions about whether a pickled sheep is really art rub shoulders with more profound and time-honoured fears about whether God exists. In this radically new way of looking at philosophy, Stephen Law illustrates the problem with a story then lets both sides of the argument battle it out in clear, easily digestible and intelligent prose. And, by separating each issue into a distinct section, it is possible to dip in and out of in any order and at any time you like!

Headline Review

The Universe Next Door

Marcus Chown
Authors:
Marcus Chown

Can time run backwards? Can we live forever? Could our universe have been created as a DIY experiment by superior beings in another universe? These questions may sound crazy but they explore the limits of our current knowledge and highlight the key issues modern scientists are wrestling to understand.As Cosmology Consultant at the New Scientist, Marcus Chown often comes across ideas that leave his head spinning. In this hugely entertaining, accessible and mind-blowing book, he explores the ramifications of, as he puts it, science with the 'wow!' factor.

Alok Jha

Alok Jha is a journalist and broadcaster based in London. He is science correspondent for ITN and, before that, was science correspondent at the Guardian. He has presented science programmes for BBC2 and BBC Radio 4. Alok received a science-writing award from the American Institute of Physics in 2014, was named European Science Writer of the year in 2008, and has been shortlisted for feature writer of the year at the annual Association of British Science Writers awards".

David Kennard

David Kennard's name has become a familiar one in the nation's media, featuring in the Mail on Sunday, Daily Telegraph and The Times as well as on the BBC's 'Countryfile', Radio Four and on his bestselling video and DVD, The Year of the Working Sheepdog. His first book, A Shepherd's Watch, was a Sunday Times bestseller. He lives in North Devon with his wife Debbie, three children Clare, Laura and Nick - and, of course, his dogs.

Diane Ackerman

Diane Ackerman has been the finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Non-fiction in addition to many other awards and recognitions for her work, which include the international bestsellers The Zookeeper's Wife and A Natural History of the Senses. She lives with her husband Paul West in Ithaca, New York.

Jon Butterworth

Jon Butterworth is a leading physicist on the Large Hadron Collider, and Head of Physics and Astronomy at UCL. He writes the popular Life & Physics blog for the Guardian and has written articles for a range of publications including the Guardian and New Scientist. Jon often discusses physics in public, including talks at the Royal Institution and the Wellcome Trust and appearances on BBC Radio 4's Today Programme, The Infinite Money Cage, BBC Newsnight, Horizon, Channel 4 News and Al Jazeera. He was awarded the Chadwick Medal of the Institute of Physics in 2013 for his pioneering work in high energy particle physics, especially in the understanding of hadronic jets. His book Smashing Physics was shortlisted for the 2015 Royal Society Winton Prize.

Maggie Jackson

Maggie Jackson is the award-winning author of Distracted and What's Happening to Home? A former Boston Globe columnist known for her coverage of social issues, especially technology's impact on humanity, her essays and articles have appeared in The New York Times and Business Week. Jackson is a vice president and senior fellow at the New York-based think tank The Center for Talent Innovation, a past affiliate of the Institute for the Future in Palo Alto, and a former journalism fellow at the University of Maryland. She is a graduate of Yale and the London School of Economics, and has strong connections with the UK and UK media

Marcus Chown

Marcus Chown is the Cosmology Consultant for New Scientist magazine. He has a first-class degree in physics from the University of London and an MSc in astrophysics from the California Institute of Technology.

Matt Simon

Matt Simon is a journalist who writes Wired Science's 'Absurd Creature of the Week' column. He has also edited Wired's 'This Day in Tech blog', which was compiled into the book Mad Science, and writes a second column called 'Fantastically Wrong' that explores the strangest mistakes in folklore and science. He lives in San Francisco.

Neil Ansell

Neil Ansell is an award winning television journalist with the BBC and a long standing writer for the broadsheets. He is the author of two previous books, Deep Country and Deer Island, and has contributed to nature programmes and wildlife documentaries though his main focus is news and current affairs. He has two daughters and lives in Brighton.

Paul Mceuen

Paul McEuen is currently the Goldwin Smith Professor of Physics at Cornell University and an award-winning expert on nanotechnology, looking at the applications of nano-electronics in chemistry and biology. He is a technical adviser to the CIA, Intel and Harvard amongst other institutions. This is Paul's first novel.

Stephen Law

Stephen Law is a lecturer in philosophy at Heythrop College, University of London, and was formerly Research Fellow in Philosophy at Queen's College, Oxford. He received his doctoral degree in philosophy from the University of Oxford.

Zack Scott

Zack Scott is a former RAF technician from Carlisle. After leaving the air force, Zack decided to pursue his creative interests and retrain as a graphic designer. Apollo is his first book.