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Hour Of Darkness (Bob Skinner series, Book 24)

Hour Of Darkness (Bob Skinner series, Book 24)

Blood will out, always…

Quintin Jardine’s Bob Skinner novel Hour of Darkness sees the Edinburgh cop faced with a case that calls every part of his life into question.
Perfect for fans of Ian Rankin and Peter May.

The body of a murdered woman is found washed up on Cramond Island near the mouth of the River Forth. Days later detectives are called to a flat in Edinburgh; the kitchen is covered in blood, and the occupier is missing.

When the name of the woman from Cramond Island is revealed, it stirs unwelcome memories for those who knew her, Chief Constable Bob Skinner most of all. Now based in Glasgow, he has no reason to become involved in the case. Yet he does, unwittingly setting in motion a course that leads him to the toughest choice of his life, putting him in the midst of a personal nightmare, both life-threatening and career changing.

What readers are saying about Hour of Darkness:

Well written [with] twists and turns galore’

EnthrallingI could hardly put it down. Finished it in next to no time and what a brilliant climax’

‘Quintin Jardine writes the most interesting detective stories and always keeps you wanting more
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Genre: Fiction & Related Items / Crime & Mystery

On Sale: 8th May 2014

Price: £8.99

ISBN-13: 9780755357079

Reviews

Praise for Quintin Jardine: If Ian Rankin is the Robert Carlyle of Scottish crime writers, then Jardine is surely its Sean Connery
Glasgow Herald
If you're looking for a detective whose personal life is as active, contradictory and complicated as his job then follow the Edinburgh exploits of Deputy Chief Constable Bob Skinner in Quintin Jardine's Skinner series
Radio Times
A complex and suspenseful saga that never flags from start to finish
Bolton Evening News
Gritty cop drama that makes Taggart look tame
Northern Echo
More twists and turns than TV's Taggart at its best
Stirling Observer
Deplorably readable
Guardian
Compelling stuff
Oxford Times